ESF Shuns North American Juniors

ESF Shuns North American Juniors

Joined: June 22nd, 2007, 1:18 am

June 22nd, 2007, 1:44 am #1

Yesterday all North American Juniors were given a response from the ESF in response to their greivance, on not being able to play in the main draws of the Dutch Junior Open. In their wisdom they have decided that if players do not qualify as a ESF ranked player, no matter of their status in their home country they would not be able to enter into the main draws unless there were not enough players to fill the draws.Once we had entered,and paid a tidy sum, (each player has invested over $3000.00), we were sent an email from the Dutch association telling us of our plight.
Here is some history on what has happened over the last couple of weeks.
Although the article is long it is quite interesting!!!!!!!!!!

Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands


The letter below is in response to the letter recieved:

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222
To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222following letter to the ESF:To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie


Our National bodies also sent a letter which I will not attach, but is very similar in context. We were subsequently sent a letter of refusal of our request.

This is by far the worst decision a Squash Body has ever and will make.

Thanks for your time!
and come and play in the US and Canadian Junior Open in Dec. 2007
We will take all entries into our National Open Championships and will welcome you with open arms!
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Joined: June 22nd, 2007, 6:39 am

June 22nd, 2007, 6:56 am #2

I would fully support an increase to a 128 draw and this is something that the Pioneer has accomodated in the past. The Dutch organisers actively try and keep numbers down-they had a minimum tournament rule a couple of years ago which backfired on them as the entry was depleted. Perhaps it is time for the DJO to be downgraded from a Super Series

Unfortunately this is one of the issues as squash becomes increasingly popular and National Federations (especially the smaller ones) struggle to manage the logistics. From past experience the US Squash organisation has also ignored national rankings when it comes to seedings.

Look on the bright side-Amsterdam has lots to interest.

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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 4:49 pm

June 22nd, 2007, 10:21 am #3

I do understand the problem that is faced by players from North America and I think you will find that it is the ESF that has
demanded that the draw will not be above 64,I know for a fact that both the Pioneer and the Dutch wanted to have as many participants as possible.
There is a problem as the month of July is
the only long period where players can travel for a considerable time and so many players from many ESF member countries want to participate in tournaments during the month of July and have not been accepted into the 64 draw due to the number of entrees.
Is it fair that a player from say Canada or USA or Eygpt should have priority
over a player from Cyprus or Crotia or Ireland who are full payed up member countries of the ESF and whose players may not get into the main draw due to there being many non ESF players applying.If the ESF members support the Association all through the year then I feel that it is unfair to these members to be penalised for this.
Obviously the ESF must now take a very hard look at this situation and find a fair balance for all parties involved.
If the British Open can have a 128 draw then I see no reason for the Dutch and Pioneer to also become a Gold event unless there is some other reason that I am not aware of.
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Joined: June 22nd, 2007, 12:49 pm

June 22nd, 2007, 12:58 pm #4

This is the absolute stupidest thing I've ever heard. I am one of the 10 or so players travelling over for the two events from Canada and to hear that we can't play the "real" event is absolutely appalling.
In response to the person above........we don't want priority over Europeans, we want equality. This tournament should no longer be called the Open if is how they treat the foreigners. I can also guarantee that North America has plenty of quality players going over too. My family payed the 3000 dollars and to know I won't be able to compete to the fullest is completely ridiculous. I'd like the contact information of whoever was the main man behind this decision.

Like Mark said.....come to the Canadian and US Junior Opens.....at least you'll get to play with the best!
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Joined: June 23rd, 2007, 10:18 pm

June 23rd, 2007, 10:28 pm #5

Yesterday all North American Juniors were given a response from the ESF in response to their greivance, on not being able to play in the main draws of the Dutch Junior Open. In their wisdom they have decided that if players do not qualify as a ESF ranked player, no matter of their status in their home country they would not be able to enter into the main draws unless there were not enough players to fill the draws.Once we had entered,and paid a tidy sum, (each player has invested over $3000.00), we were sent an email from the Dutch association telling us of our plight.
Here is some history on what has happened over the last couple of weeks.
Although the article is long it is quite interesting!!!!!!!!!!

Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands


The letter below is in response to the letter recieved:

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222
To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222following letter to the ESF:To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie


Our National bodies also sent a letter which I will not attach, but is very similar in context. We were subsequently sent a letter of refusal of our request.

This is by far the worst decision a Squash Body has ever and will make.

Thanks for your time!
and come and play in the US and Canadian Junior Open in Dec. 2007
We will take all entries into our National Open Championships and will welcome you with open arms!
This is crap you people won't let good squash players come over seas to play but you will allow hacks from all over europe play. This is pathetic and when the europeans come over they are allowed to play in our tournaments. Your just favouring europeans over us even if we had signed up before them. If i had a chance to come over I would kick th crap out of all the hacks you call squash players.

This is total crap and you better be giving are money back for putting us in our own little tournament where we play eachother and kill crappy kids who can't play squash. We want to pay over $3000 to play in a fake tournament when we can do that here and we don't care about a vacation we are there to play squash and win your tournament which will be easy considering your scared to put us in your main draws.
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Joined: June 23rd, 2007, 10:18 pm

June 23rd, 2007, 10:43 pm #6

oh yeah thanks Ian for allowing us to use your facilities and use all the same stuff. As if thats going to make us want to come now. The only reason were there is to play squash not to come and enjoy watching the kids in the main round.

I'm sick of this and you don't know how to run a squash tournament as I can see.
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 4:49 pm

June 24th, 2007, 4:54 am #7

Dear Nick,
obviously you are aware of all the facts regarding the DJO and it seems that you are also an expert on running tournaments but lets look at some of the facts.
1. Are you aware that the Pioneer is also a 64 draw and that no points will be awarded over the 64 draw.Both the Pioneer and the Dutch wanted to have a 128 draw but were told by the ESF that if they did this they would be fined.I suggest you ask your association to deal direct with the ESF and stop making malicious statements.
As to the European players who you feel are not upto standard,they are in the same boat as you as many of them are also not able to play the main draw.
I am sure that North America has some outstanding players as can be seen in the results of the Italian Junior Open.
It is not on a first come first served system, sadly players from ALL countries have been effected that many of them are from North America is upsetting but I presume that for many of them this is there first tournament in Europe.
THE PROBLEM MUST NOW BE SOLVED BY THE ESF,for you to throw mud and abuse at IAN is unfair and the wrong address.
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Joined: June 27th, 2007, 12:03 am

June 27th, 2007, 2:33 am #8

Yesterday all North American Juniors were given a response from the ESF in response to their greivance, on not being able to play in the main draws of the Dutch Junior Open. In their wisdom they have decided that if players do not qualify as a ESF ranked player, no matter of their status in their home country they would not be able to enter into the main draws unless there were not enough players to fill the draws.Once we had entered,and paid a tidy sum, (each player has invested over $3000.00), we were sent an email from the Dutch association telling us of our plight.
Here is some history on what has happened over the last couple of weeks.
Although the article is long it is quite interesting!!!!!!!!!!

Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands


The letter below is in response to the letter recieved:

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222
To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222following letter to the ESF:To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie


Our National bodies also sent a letter which I will not attach, but is very similar in context. We were subsequently sent a letter of refusal of our request.

This is by far the worst decision a Squash Body has ever and will make.

Thanks for your time!
and come and play in the US and Canadian Junior Open in Dec. 2007
We will take all entries into our National Open Championships and will welcome you with open arms!
To whom it may concern,
Recently, I was informed that the ESF is refusing to allow the un-seeded North Americans to play in the main draw of the Dutch Junior Open. When you decline our request to participate in this international tournament, you are not only penalizing us, but your own top juniors as they will not be able to play different players from diverse countries. When the European players enter these international tournaments, I would imagine they expect to play players from different countries as well. I have put forth a huge commitment to prepare myself to play top European junior squash players. I am currently training twice a day, and to understand that we are unable to play the best players, disappoints me. Not only have I put forth this commitment, but so have many canadian coaches by creating training opportunities leading up to the tourney. Travelling half way across the world to participate in an event like the Dutch Junior Open displays a tremendous amount of commitment on the behalf of the unseeded North American junior players. Many times in the history of racquet sports has an unseeded player come from nowhere to capture the title and surprise the other participants and obsevers.
Preventing us from not playing in this tournament would not only frustrate me, but it would not look good in front of the Olympic committee. Squash is one of the many sports being reviewed for the upcoming Olympic Games in Bejing. Choosing not to allow countries to come together and participate shows the committee that squash is not an cooperative, international sport. There would not be enough international competition to support the sport as a regular at the Olympics. We all know that this is not true, but unfortunately, I believe it will give enough evidence to the committee to rule out squash as a Olympic sport.
I hope you make the right decision and allow us to play in a tournament that I have dreamed of attending since I began playing squash.

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Joined: June 28th, 2007, 3:12 am

June 28th, 2007, 4:04 am #9

Yesterday all North American Juniors were given a response from the ESF in response to their greivance, on not being able to play in the main draws of the Dutch Junior Open. In their wisdom they have decided that if players do not qualify as a ESF ranked player, no matter of their status in their home country they would not be able to enter into the main draws unless there were not enough players to fill the draws.Once we had entered,and paid a tidy sum, (each player has invested over $3000.00), we were sent an email from the Dutch association telling us of our plight.
Here is some history on what has happened over the last couple of weeks.
Although the article is long it is quite interesting!!!!!!!!!!

Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands


The letter below is in response to the letter recieved:

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222
To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222following letter to the ESF:To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie


Our National bodies also sent a letter which I will not attach, but is very similar in context. We were subsequently sent a letter of refusal of our request.

This is by far the worst decision a Squash Body has ever and will make.

Thanks for your time!
and come and play in the US and Canadian Junior Open in Dec. 2007
We will take all entries into our National Open Championships and will welcome you with open arms!
How frustrating for the DJO to push punctually paid qualified players into a second tier draw. The application under eligibility states "The Dutch junior open is open to all players....as appropriate." They are contradicting their own guidelines. At this late time after timely paying for the event, expensive airfare, arranging and paying for coaching and local accomodations and arranging summer plans it is infuriating.

It is unclear who to blame the ESF? or DJO? but clearly the summer events are popular because the juniors (who are also students) have time to train, travel and enjoy an international tournament. Whoever is to blame would be well advised to check out the meaning of the word "OPEN". Next year the tourament should be call the Dutch Junior Closed.

The USSRA has always judged a player by their national ranking and tournament record. The USSRA has always accomodated timely entries. I am proud that the USSRA would never act in this fashion.

Shoud the ESF fail to correct this situation I strongly suggest that the USSRA sponsor an open summer tournament in July followed by an event in Canada. We could then demonstrate the fair way to run an event. These events would not discriminate.
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Joined: June 28th, 2007, 7:00 pm

June 28th, 2007, 7:14 pm #10

Yesterday all North American Juniors were given a response from the ESF in response to their greivance, on not being able to play in the main draws of the Dutch Junior Open. In their wisdom they have decided that if players do not qualify as a ESF ranked player, no matter of their status in their home country they would not be able to enter into the main draws unless there were not enough players to fill the draws.Once we had entered,and paid a tidy sum, (each player has invested over $3000.00), we were sent an email from the Dutch association telling us of our plight.
Here is some history on what has happened over the last couple of weeks.
Although the article is long it is quite interesting!!!!!!!!!!

Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands


The letter below is in response to the letter recieved:

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222
To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie msachvie@whiteoaksresort.com 905-6882032 ext. 5222following letter to the ESF:To whom it may concern

Recently we received a letter attached:

Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:37 AM

Dear squash friends and colleagues,

Please be informed that, following ESF guidelines, the entries to the Dutch Junior Open will be limited to a maximum of 64 players per category.
Following the seeding of the event by the ESF, players outside of the top 64 per category will not be eligible for participation in the main event.
The Dutch Squash Federation (SBN) will organize an alternative event for those players. There will be no ranking points awarded in this alternative event, as it is not part of the ESF Junior Circuit. It is impossible for SBN to guarantee the level of competition, or the number of matches, until all entries have been processed.
We offer the same package and facilities as the Dutch JO main event to all players wishing to participate, so hope that we will still see all of you here in July for a great squash happening.

Ian Cherington
Sports Technical Manager
Squash Bond Netherlands

There are some very serious concerns about this letter that we would like to address. All the entries into this event were taken by the federation as per the posted entry form. In fact before this letter was received flights had been booked, and monies were transferred to the association as the entry form said. A few reasons for many of the juniors to travel and play in Europe are:
1. To compete against the best players in Europe is a gage for our top players to see if their level of play is up to world class standards.
2. To compete as a National Squad player as some of these entries are, and with the upcoming year being a Junior Boy’s worlds, give our athletes and our countries an idea were we stand as a team in the upcoming worlds. Players are encouraged by their National associations to compete at European Junior Squash events so they can gain European ranking points, so their National teams at the worlds earn a legitimate seeding.
3. To give the European players an opportunity to play other juniors outside of the regular circuit players. This is as important to them as it makes for an interesting and exciting tournament.
4. Players from North America are also trying to follow in the footsteps of some of our top International players such as Jonathon Power, Graham Ryding, Gary Waite, and Mark Talbott. They aspire to emulate these players as they are heroes and role models to all these kids. In fact some of the Kids participating have been coached for several months’ in preparation for these events by not only Jonathon, Graham but Mike Way, Keith Griffith’s, Doug Whittaker and others.

In regards to your letter and decision for these players to not be able to compete:
1. All the players from North America signed up in good faith to enter into the main draws. Up until this letter and through discussions with the association we were never made aware of having to play in a secondary event. This we see as pure deception. As I have said earlier, flights, entry money etc. had been taken and these kids along with their coaches and or parents have made a huge investment
2. As I have said some of the players are top players in North America. It is totally unfair not to qualify and recognize their playing ability and throw them into secondary tournaments. Both the US and Canada are bringing members of their Junior Squads, with some of them being National champions, US Open champions, Canadian Open championships, Provincial and State champions.
3. The British and Scottish Junior Opens which also are under the ESF ruleand do not limit entries, and at the very least have a qualifier. Not only this but the British has players from European countries that have not necessarily played in an ESF event, yet they get considerations.
4. This ruling creates unnecessary borders in a game that we fight to be in the Olympics.It’s played all over the world and at a time when our game seems to be flourishing at the Junior level, I would suggest this sets the game back.
5. For what it’s worth many of the coaches coming over with kids are also the same coaches who are on our seeding committees, and chairperson’s of our National Opens. These same people spend hours and go into great depths to seed the Canadian Open and the US Open in a fair manner, always taking into account players from abroad. Mark Sachvie Canadian Seeding chair and Canadian Open chairperson, Vijay Chitnis US Open chair and their committees take great interest in this particular task. Bryan Patterson is also on the US seeding committee. In the past we have went out of our way to accommodate players and coaches from England when they had difficult problems arise. David Moorish from Wycliffe College can attest to that!
6. If players and coaches were notified that they may not get into the main draws, I would think that 90% or more of your entries from North America would not enter. Is this something that the ESF wishes; for North Americans not to participate.
7. If the event is truly only open to the top 64 or 32 ranked ESF players, then the entry form should have that highlighted. You would not be in the position your in, and we would not be in our subsequent position either. I would also suggest that because of the tournament being called THE OPEN, the perception is just that!


In closing we would like the ESF to take a look at this decision and reverse it for this year. If the decision in the future, (next year) and on is to limit draws based on ESF ranking than so be it. North America will have to adjust.

For your consideration on behalf of the US and Canadian Coaches

Junior development officer for Squash Ontario

Mark Sachvie


Our National bodies also sent a letter which I will not attach, but is very similar in context. We were subsequently sent a letter of refusal of our request.

This is by far the worst decision a Squash Body has ever and will make.

Thanks for your time!
and come and play in the US and Canadian Junior Open in Dec. 2007
We will take all entries into our National Open Championships and will welcome you with open arms!
Now this makes total sense: Accept applications from international players, deposit their entry fees, let their parents (who have worked hard for the thousands of dollars it costs to send their children to Holland) purchase plane tickets and hotel rooms, get the kids to train hard for an OPEN tournament, and then tell everybody "SURPRISE" - this tournament is for Dutch player only.

Reading about this from the father of one of the North American players "booted" from the event was very, very distressing to me. This kid busted his butt all year in school and on the squash court only to be completely let down by the tournament organizers/Dutch squash federation.

Congratulations. The DJO wins for wasting hard earned money and ruining a bunch of kids' summer.
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