Chinese Anchor Babies Take Brooklyn, New York by Storm

Chinatown, Little Italy, Little Hungary, and More

Chinese Anchor Babies Take Brooklyn, New York by Storm

subprimeba
Bridge and Tunnel
Joined: 09 Jan 2011, 13:26

22 Jul 2011, 08:34 #1

Chinese Anchor Babies are not just on the west coast. This post by "Ratbstard" on a forum dedicated to legal immigration tells the story.


As I live in a Chinese neighborhood (it is now any way) I'll share what I have observed in the last 20 some odd years.

Eight Av. here in Brooklyn was chosen to be colonized in the mid 80's. Eight is some sort of Lucky Number in Chinese culture. First Rich Legal immigrants started buying up properties at about 25% over the appraisal values. Many actually paid tenants who had leases 10 to 20 thousand $ to move out.

These roots having been established more and more Chinese started to arrive who were not rich but just looking for a better life. In this second wave I don't believe many came legally, some might have had visas they over stayed but I think most just jumped ship. Remember the ship "Golden Venture" that ran aground just off the Rockaways in 94?

Well by 95 these colonists became the majority in the neighborhood. The rich were then able to start snapping up properties at well below appraisal values because actual Americans no longer cared to remain in or move back to the neighborhood.

By the mid aughts the take over was complete and very few properties remained that weren't Chinese owned. Slowly but surely as these few hangers on leave their properties are bought by Chinese but now again at above appraisal value.

PS105, the local grade school became so overcrowded a second elementary school had to be built less than 5 blocks away in the late 90's. A third school is now under construction directly between those 2!

During this colonization very few conflicts arose. Now though as the neighborhood expands outwards into what were once Hispanic sections of Brooklyn west of 5th and 4th Avenues tensions are rising. The local media try to downplay whats happening but as I live here I am aware of what is happening.
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alittleone
Bridge and Tunnel
Joined: 26 Jan 2011, 13:03

22 Jul 2011, 09:15 #2

Wait, they moved to 8th Avenue because it's lucky number 8?

I actually had never heard about "The Golden Venture" illegal immigrant smuggling ship before but it's a crazy story for sure. Almost 300 illegal Chinese immigrants jumped ship. I found this.
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feng
Bridge and Tunnel
Joined: 07 Jan 2011, 14:56

22 Jul 2011, 13:28 #3

Chinese Anchor Babies are not just on the west coast. This post by "Ratbstard" on a forum dedicated to legal immigration tells the story.

-subprimeba
No one cares what you or "Ratbstard" or your ilk think, you racist fuck. Your username is "Subprime BA" which says it all.

You are a disgrace to this forum and a disgrace to society.
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thenarrator
Manhattanist
Joined: 25 Nov 2009, 16:08

22 Jul 2011, 20:34 #4


No one cares what you or "Ratbstard" or your ilk think, you racist fuck. Your username is "Subprime BA" which says it all.
You are a disgrace to this forum and a disgrace to society.


-feng
Hey, Feng, can it!

What I am interested in is how many of these Brooklyn babies are anchor babies. There must be some stats somewhere from the NYS Department of Health of how many babies born in NYS and NYC are from foreign mothers on a temp visa.
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queensrider
Bridge and Tunnel
Joined: 20 Nov 2010, 16:13

22 Jul 2011, 23:33 #5


What I am interested in is how many of these Brooklyn babies are anchor babies. There must be some stats somewhere from the NYS Department of Health of how many babies born in NYS and NYC are from foreign mothers on a temp visa.


-thenarrator
The Star News article looks at the Chinese Anchor Babies industry in Queens.




Across the hall, an open door offered a view of a double room, with one woman sitting up in her bed and another lying under a blanket. The women, both new mothers, were there for the Chinese practice of postpartum confinement — called zuo yuezi, or, in Mandarin, sitting the month.


To Western ears, confinement sounds like something out of a Victorian novel, but in some traditional Asian cultures, women still spend the month after a baby’s birth in pampered seclusion. Typically, a woman’s relatives would care for her, but more recently, the practice has been outsourced to postpartum doulas and confinement centers, like the one Ms. Lu operates. In the United States, they cater to middle-class immigrant women separated from their families. Business is steady enough in New York City to support at least four postpartum centers, tucked away in the heavily Asian-immigrant neighborhoods of Flushing and Bayside, Queens.

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