Smooth Hound Behavior

Discess The Different Species Of Sharks, Skates & Rays, and Their Captive Care.

Smooth Hound Behavior

garman
Catshark
garman
Catshark
Joined: 18 Jul 2014, 15:29

06 Aug 2014, 22:19 #1

Anyone know why these sharks swim at the top of the water with the tip of their nose out?

You can see what Im saying here in the back on the tank in this video at 1:55

http://youtu.be/BNDJ3F9i3PQ

I own one and work at a large wholesaler and noticed this behavior in our tanks, my home tank, and online in other videos. I noticed an old thread where someone mentioned this as being normal including zoo diver. Anyone have any more insight into this behavior?

http://youtu.be/AV6E6HpfbKA
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krj-1168
Great White Shark
krj-1168
Great White Shark
Joined: 18 Dec 2006, 23:32

06 Aug 2014, 23:42 #2

I didn't really seeing odd or abnormal in the smooth hound group tank in the first video. Like others have already said seem to be fairly normal behavior for smooth hounds.

It could be similar to "spy hopping", were the smooth hounds are just trying to see what is above the surface of the water. Other species of sharks sometimes do this as well - including the Great White.

On the other hand - the second video is a bit more concerning. As it appears the shark is attempting to force more air/water over it gills. Which could signal that either it has some kind of gill burn or that the tank's dissolved O2 levels are too low. Smooth hounds are highly sensitive to low dissolved O2 levels.
Bigger is Better - especially with shark tanks
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Cu455
Blacktip Reef
Cu455
Blacktip Reef
Joined: 06 Sep 2013, 03:27

07 Aug 2014, 00:04 #3

I can't see the first video. The second video is awesome. Maybe he enjoys having the water flow over his claspers.

I have no idea about the head bobbing though.
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garman
Catshark
garman
Catshark
Joined: 18 Jul 2014, 15:29

07 Aug 2014, 00:56 #4

krj-1168 @ Aug 6 2014, 06:42 PM wrote:
On the other hand - the second video is a bit more concerning. As it appears the shark is attempting to force more air/water over it gills. Which could signal that either it has some kind of gill burn or that the tank's dissolved O2 levels are too low.  Smooth hounds are highly sensitive to low dissolved O2 levels.

Thanks for the insight, I was thinking o2 levels also. Ammonia is Zero.

There's two 1300 GPH powerheads hitting the surface, 820gph return line, 1000 gph overflow box, 500 GPH powerhead in the sump, 500gph canister with return breaking the surface for water polishing. Temp is at 70.1 F. Going down to 68 at night.

San Diego Bay Current water Temps are 74.3F with Los Angeles is 64.8. Im Located in South Florida.

This is a Califonicus smooth hound so hopefully that temperature works and he normals out.
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Cu455
Blacktip Reef
Cu455
Blacktip Reef
Joined: 06 Sep 2013, 03:27

07 Aug 2014, 01:59 #5

sometimes a pump will raise the tempeture more them it will cool it off by breaking the water surface. Maybe throw some air stones instead of a pump. My temperature was getting over 85. I used a 15 gallon bucket and added a overflow to fuge. The bucket is half full so the water has a pretty big drop. Now my temp is about 79. Probably keeps my dissolved oxygen levels high to.




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alprazo
Bonnethead
alprazo
Bonnethead
Joined: 06 Oct 2009, 02:41

07 Aug 2014, 02:09 #6

I catch these sharks frequently. Some will exhibit head bobbing within minutes of placing them into a 8 foot pool after being taken directly from the ocean, some take a couple of days and some seem not to show this behavior. The pool is full of water from the ocean, identically matched. Pumps or other electrical equipment being on or off doesn't make a difference. They continue to bob at night, so daylight doesn't seem to effect things. When placed back into the ocean, they all instantly stop bobbing and resume a normal swimming pattern.

My guess is that the sense the walls of the pool and look for an area of long open space to swim. The only place is up.

When I placed a clear poly trap on the surface of the water in the pool, they stopped bobbing.

Despite their smaller size, I believe that they need large open spaces to navigate properly. I no longer keep them or offer them to others. It is my own personal observations and thoughts - no scientific support behind them.
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garman
Catshark
garman
Catshark
Joined: 18 Jul 2014, 15:29

07 Aug 2014, 03:05 #7

alprazo @ Aug 6 2014, 09:09 PM wrote: I catch these sharks frequently. Some will exhibit head bobbing within minutes of placing them into a 8 foot pool after being taken directly from the ocean, some take a couple of days and some seem not to show this behavior. The pool is full of water from the ocean, identically matched. Pumps or other electrical equipment being on or off doesn't make a difference. They continue to bob at night, so daylight doesn't seem to effect things. When placed back into the ocean, they all instantly stop bobbing and resume a normal swimming pattern.

My guess is that the sense the walls of the pool and look for an area of long open space to swim. The only place is up.

When I placed a clear poly trap on the surface of the water in the pool, they stopped bobbing.

Despite their smaller size, I believe that they need large open spaces to navigate properly. I no longer keep them or offer them to others. It is my own personal observations and thoughts - no scientific support behind them.

Thanks it was your post I read on another forum, I am a diver and was a collector in South Florida I never seen the Atlantic species but it seems to make sense. I believe the belong in the ocean also, after observing their behavior, but its too late as I already own him. There's definitely adequate swimming room as I also have a Marbled Cat that swims and glides through the space it just doesn't fit a smoothounds swimming style. He still is laying on the powerheads from time to time but he calms down when the other shark is out. Only time will tell.
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alprazo
Bonnethead
alprazo
Bonnethead
Joined: 06 Oct 2009, 02:41

07 Aug 2014, 03:16 #8

The Atlantic species M. Canis is similar, but I think the M californicus is a little lighter in color and did better in navigating a large aquarium despite being larger in size.
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krj-1168
Great White Shark
krj-1168
Great White Shark
Joined: 18 Dec 2006, 23:32

07 Aug 2014, 04:04 #9

Well 68-70F seems to be about right for the water temps.

Bigger is Better - especially with shark tanks
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garman
Catshark
garman
Catshark
Joined: 18 Jul 2014, 15:29

07 Aug 2014, 04:33 #10

Update: I turned off the powerheads in the tank and swapped out air pumps. The shark is a lot calmer, not looking to jump out. Just taking nice laps around the tank still bobbing his nose, and checking out the bottom a little more. He's been eating so I think all is well for now.
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