Book Species List

Thinking About Keeping A Shark or Ray? Ask Your Questions Here.

Book Species List

biggiesmalls
Blacktip Reef
biggiesmalls
Blacktip Reef
Joined: January 9th, 2016, 7:02 pm

April 2nd, 2018, 3:49 pm #1

Hello everyone, 

The book idea has been silent for a while, but I've picked it back up in the past month. I gutted it and started over. The species list I have thus far is:

Wobbegongs
Cobbler wobbegong
Dwarf spotted wobbegong
Japanese wobbegong 
Network wobbegong
Northern wobbegong
Ornate wobbegong
Spotted wobbegong
Tasseled wobbegong

Bamboo/Carpet Sharks
Arabian bamboo shark
Blotchy swell shark
Bluegrey carpetshark
Brown-banded bamboo shark
Collared carpetshark
Epaulette shark
Gray bamboo shark
Halmahera epaulette shark
Indonesian bamboo shark
Nurse shark
Papuan epaulette shark
Rusty carpetshark
Short-tail nurse shark
Speckled epaulette shark
Swell shark
White-spotted bamboo shark
Zebra shark

Catsharks and Bullhead Sharks
Bali catshark
Banded sand catshark
California horn shark
Chain catshark
Cloudy catshark
Coral catshark
Graceful catshark
Izu catshark
Japanese horn shark
Leopard catshark
Marbled catshark
Port jackson shark
Pyjama catshark
Small-spotted catshark
Spotted-belly catshark
Zebra horn shark

Non-ORV Sharks
Banded houndshark
Brown smoothhound
Common smoothhound
Dusky smoothhound
Gray smoothhound
Leopard shark
Spiny dogfish
White-tip reef shark

ORV Sharks
Atlantic sharpnose shark
Black-tip reef shark
Blacknose shark
Bonnethead shark
Finetooth shark

Still working on rays. The species above are all definitely going in. However, here's where things get tricky. 
I have some other species which I have seen mention of, but have not actually seen up for sale or in private hands at any point. These are:
  • Banded wobbegong
  • Indonesian wobbegong
  • Japanese wobbegong
  • Blind shark
  • Hooded epaulette shark
  • Indonesian speckled epaulette shark
  • Milne bay epaulette shark
  • Pacific nurse shark
  • Tawny nurse shark
  • Triton bay epaulette shark
  • Australian blackspotted catshark
  • Blackspotted catshark
Then, I have seen bull sharks, lemon sharks, blacktip sharks, broadnose sevengill sharks, and grey reef sharks in private hands before, but they are ORV sharks which get larger than what can be recommended for nearly any private aquarium - still, I am debating including these in a short section of their own as sharks that are available, but not at all recommended (and they come with a price tag to match). There are also Sandbar and Sand Tiger sharks, but I do not know of a way to get these without a permit, which means being a public aquarium, essentially. There are other species that I was considering including, such as carolina/scalloped/great hammerheads, galapagos sharks, dusky sharks, silky sharks, and tiger sharks - but these all reach over 12 feet, and I've never seen any of them in private hands before - so there's no real need to include them in the book (MAYBE a paragraph about them saying that while they are found in captivity at times, they will never really make their way into private hands, rightfully so). Also nixed the pacific angel shark since I believe those are protected now, and one account of a private individual owning one in like 2005 doesn't quite convince me to include them. 

So my main question - does anybody know of any incidences of the species on that bulleted list being kept in captivity? I'm going to keep looking myself, as I'd like to include them but not if they aren't in captivity at all. 

Thanks,
Drew
"Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet. Imagine what you'll know tomorrow"
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krj-1168
Great White Shark
krj-1168
Great White Shark
Joined: December 18th, 2006, 11:32 pm

April 6th, 2018, 4:11 am #2

Looks pretty good so far. 

As for the species which you have not seen for sale or in private hands. I know for a fact that some of those have been in private hands. For example - Shark & Reef International recently had a Blind Shark for $900.

Although some others maybe not here in North America.  
Bigger is Better - especially with shark tanks
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krj-1168
Great White Shark
krj-1168
Great White Shark
Joined: December 18th, 2006, 11:32 pm

April 9th, 2018, 2:21 pm #3

Pacific Nurse Sharks may be sometimes sold in North America as just Nurse Sharks, since it only recently been classified as a separate species.

While the Tawny Nurse Sharks tend to be kept more often by European, Asian and Australian aquarists. 

Like wise - many of the Epaulettes and Australian catsharks are also mainly kept by Australian, European and Asian aquarists. As it tends to be very difficult to get Australian animals to North American markets.  

Personally I would not even worry about doing profiles for many of the public aquarium species - like Bull Sharks, Sand Tiger/Grey Nurse, Lemon Sharks, or such.  As these species tend to be suitable for Public Aquariums only. As 99.9% of private aquarists are not capable of caring for them at their adult sizes.  
Bigger is Better - especially with shark tanks
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biggiesmalls
Blacktip Reef
biggiesmalls
Blacktip Reef
Joined: January 9th, 2016, 7:02 pm

April 11th, 2018, 12:34 am #4

I would like for the book to include only species found in Canada and the USA - so the North American market. Anything found only in European/Asian/Australian markets, I would prefer to exclude. 

I did see the Blind Shark after you had told me, so we can include it for sure. As far as the Pacific Nurse Shark goes, there is a wholesaler who sells nurse sharks from the "East Americas" and "West Americas" - so there are likely some Pacific Nurse Sharks in the market, so we can include them in the book. 

As far as lemon, bull, and blacktip sharks go - I think there will be a small mention that if a hobbyist seriously wants to keep them, they should consult something with more experience than a book, like a large public facility which has had success with keeping the species. The same would go for any other species they may want to keep, which I won't go into detail about because they rarely if ever come up in the hobby. They are large, predatory, obligate sharks which need specialized care that goes further into what a book can offer (at least written by me), IMO. 
Now, if there was another book that was geared towards public aquariums and keeping those larger sharks - that's another story. But that's certainly not my place to write about, and I'd like to avoid it for the time being. 

Ken, what species would you add to that list? And what species would you take off of it? 

Drew
"Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet. Imagine what you'll know tomorrow"
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krj-1168
Great White Shark
krj-1168
Great White Shark
Joined: December 18th, 2006, 11:32 pm

April 19th, 2018, 3:20 am #5

Well - first the swell sharks are part of the Catshark family - not the carpet sharks.

I doubt I would include the Spiny Dogfish, Common & Brown Smoothhounds.  The Spiny Dogfish are fairly difficult to keep for private aquarist. As is the Brown Smoothhound. The Common Smoothhound is very similar to the Dusky Smoothhound in size and basic care.

In addition - the Atlantic Sharpnose. Blacknose, & Finetooth sharks should have only brief care sheet information - as these species are rarely kept by private aquarists - and almost never outside of the Atlantic and Gulf coast states.  

In terms of possible species to add - remember that they may be a few Multi-millionaire aquarists out there who can afford a 100,000+ gallon shark tank/pond. At that size species like Sandbars, and Lemons would be possible to keep. Still they should only listed in a brief bio/care information.
Bigger is Better - especially with shark tanks
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