Seiko SCUBA essay #2 & 3, that gritty winding and a SAP!

Joined: 3:38 AM - Jul 19, 2008

6:32 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #1

Original date of posting: 06-17-2007


Well, as luck would have it, my Scuba started runing slow. I was sure it was going to do this, as it ran just to close to perfect! Break in is not some mysterious phenomena to me, it is a FACT. Break in is the result of the microsopic burnishing and polishing that most pivots and train gears go through in the first few weeks of a new movements life, allowing more power to get to the balance, resulting in a longer swing. This longer swing results in a longer period of time between beats, it is this longer period inbetween beats that causes the movement to slow down. When I first got the watch, she was runing a impressive +1/day over several days. But that soon started to slip to a negative figure, and within a few weeks it was -5 to -10/day. So last night I got the idea I wanted to regulate it, but then I thought why regulate it and not investigate that gritty crown? But then to add to that, I thought, why not go the hole she-bang and try and put that sapphire crystal in?





So........... Gritty crown goes first, LOL.

First, as has been pointed out before, there is some grittyness to be expected in this watch in the winding direction. This is because durring winding, the power flow must go THROUGH the "magic lever pawl wheel", otherwise known as a transmision wheel. It is the levers "pawls" being drug against the transmision wheel that give most handwinding Seiko`s that distinctive gritty feeling when winding and is not in and of itself a reason to be concerned, as long as this occures in the actual winding direction of the crown ONLY.



OK, thats all well and good. But the problem I had with this crown is that the crown feeling was just as gritty in the non-winding or reversing direction of the crown. I knew this to be "Not right" becasue of the way the 6s15 is made. You see, Seiko has designed this caliber with a "rocking" clutch wheel, instead of the more common wolfs teeth clutch that is found in most watches. Because of this, I knew that there should be absolutley NO feeling at all in the reversing direction, except maybe some slight drag caused by the gasket.

In this picture below, the winding bridge has been removed so that the winding rocker is exposed, note that the pawl wheel would be in that exposed jewel, but has also been removed so we can see the rocker parts under the pawl wheel..........................



As you can see above, in the reversing direction durring crown winding, the rocking transmision wheel gets pulled away from the "pawl wheel" essentually being allowed to "freewheel" in the non-winding direction. IE: There should be NO grittyness in this NON-winding direction of the crown!

And so I found pretty much what I thought I would find when I pulled the crown from the case....................................

A clearance issue with the tube.............................



Oh ohh! Not good, there is metal shavings on the seal! NOT GOOD!

Another shot of the grove being worn in the crown stem.....



Fortunately, the contact is not much, and with the movement removed from the case, I was able to file out the tube "just a little", so that the stem no longer rubbed in this spot. Unfortunately, this is not an easy fix if you are not a watchmaker, and the contamination was so bad in mine that I suspect the crown seal would not have lasted another 6 months. So.................... I think Seiko is gonna have a problem, when all these seals start to leak. Of course its bean counter math at this point and if it (the seal) lasts longer then a year, Seiko wont have to worry about it, Eh? (I get tired of seeing bean counter math applied to watches, you know.)

So, if you got this grittyness in the crown as I have described (non-winding direction), and you got a warranty, USE IT! Use it NOW before the watch floods! Or wait until its just ready to expire (no diving), and get it into Seiko through Higuchi or Seiya-san. This is really a mess as I see it and although I would like to help anyone and everyone that has this problem, I`m sure I will not capable of fixing every watch that has this problem, nor can I warranty the watch after the fix, IE, if damage is done, its better to have Seiko replace the parts rather then the simple cleaning and clearancing I did.

One last note on this winding system before I get to the Sapphire crystal. If there is any real weakness in this system, it is that rocking transmision wheel and the coupling wheel in front of it. These parts are extreamly small for the tourqe they are having to deal with, only time will tell if this design is really going to be problem free in the years to come, I have my doubts (The 4s15 also uses this "rocker" winding design and they do develope problems when they are`nt serviced with some regularity.)

SCUBA Gets a SAPPHIRE!

As most everyone has seen, a sapphire crystal is available as a generic replacement for this case. It is not domed on the outside, but rather is flat on both sides. I like this better! A crystal that is domed on the outside, yet is flat on the inside, is the worst of both worlds when it comes to reflections. As everyone knows, the dome on top adds to the indirect reflections obsuring your view from the top. The resulting reflections are fairly negligable when the underside of the crystal has been domed also. But when the underside of the crystal is flat, you also get the "Total whiteout" effect caused by a direct reflection coming from the bottom side of the crystal. I would rather a crystal be domed on both sides, or flat on both sides. While I like the charector a domed crystal imparts to a watch, I have found that in almost all working enviorments, a flat crystal is better for actual veiwing. And so it is with great plesure that I got rid of the factory crystal for this double "Flat" sided sapphire crystal,

Installation of the SAP is pretty easy and if you have fitted a late model crystal that is using a plastic sealing gasket, it is the same procedure...........

Pop it out and press it in, but you should have a rock solid press, like the B&B professional press, as these require absolute precision when they are going in, or you`ll bugger the plastic gasket for sure.



Making sure the new SAP is in leval and flat.............



The one thing I like the most about this sapphire is the polished angle on it is exposed above the bezel insert, leading to a nice twinkle as the light hits it....... Its a bit more classier looking then the original because of this.



It also offers the bezel a little more protection from abuse and scratches, as it sits a little higher then the bezel.................



Nica-nica!
No gritty crown issues, and a crystal I dont have to worry about!

Oh ya, I did bump the "curb pins" (Regulator) towards fast a bit, and I`m happy to report that now, 24hrs later, it is +5 seconds fast! I can live with that until I see how it settles in.

And so with that I wrap up essays #`s 2 and 3. I hope you enjoyed it.
-------------------------------------------------

Writers NOTE: Since I posted this, I have worked on several Smore Scuba`s, and none of them have had the crown stem issue this one had. I guess my first one was just a lucky one,


Cheers,
Randall


________________________________________
Seikoholic #1
Dr.Seiko, Aka:2manywatches
Specializing in Seikology, Seikotherapy, and other Horological Dis-ease.
Made in the U.S.A.
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Joined: 4:54 AM - Aug 19, 2008

6:48 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #2

Seems like Seiko isn't paying as much attention to quality any more as opposed to profit

Apart from the manual winding bits in the 6r15; is there anything else that differentiates it from the 7s25/6?

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Joined: 11:04 AM - May 27, 2008

7:54 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #3

Original date of posting: 06-17-2007


Well, as luck would have it, my Scuba started runing slow. I was sure it was going to do this, as it ran just to close to perfect! Break in is not some mysterious phenomena to me, it is a FACT. Break in is the result of the microsopic burnishing and polishing that most pivots and train gears go through in the first few weeks of a new movements life, allowing more power to get to the balance, resulting in a longer swing. This longer swing results in a longer period of time between beats, it is this longer period inbetween beats that causes the movement to slow down. When I first got the watch, she was runing a impressive +1/day over several days. But that soon started to slip to a negative figure, and within a few weeks it was -5 to -10/day. So last night I got the idea I wanted to regulate it, but then I thought why regulate it and not investigate that gritty crown? But then to add to that, I thought, why not go the hole she-bang and try and put that sapphire crystal in?





So........... Gritty crown goes first, LOL.

First, as has been pointed out before, there is some grittyness to be expected in this watch in the winding direction. This is because durring winding, the power flow must go THROUGH the "magic lever pawl wheel", otherwise known as a transmision wheel. It is the levers "pawls" being drug against the transmision wheel that give most handwinding Seiko`s that distinctive gritty feeling when winding and is not in and of itself a reason to be concerned, as long as this occures in the actual winding direction of the crown ONLY.



OK, thats all well and good. But the problem I had with this crown is that the crown feeling was just as gritty in the non-winding or reversing direction of the crown. I knew this to be "Not right" becasue of the way the 6s15 is made. You see, Seiko has designed this caliber with a "rocking" clutch wheel, instead of the more common wolfs teeth clutch that is found in most watches. Because of this, I knew that there should be absolutley NO feeling at all in the reversing direction, except maybe some slight drag caused by the gasket.

In this picture below, the winding bridge has been removed so that the winding rocker is exposed, note that the pawl wheel would be in that exposed jewel, but has also been removed so we can see the rocker parts under the pawl wheel..........................



As you can see above, in the reversing direction durring crown winding, the rocking transmision wheel gets pulled away from the "pawl wheel" essentually being allowed to "freewheel" in the non-winding direction. IE: There should be NO grittyness in this NON-winding direction of the crown!

And so I found pretty much what I thought I would find when I pulled the crown from the case....................................

A clearance issue with the tube.............................



Oh ohh! Not good, there is metal shavings on the seal! NOT GOOD!

Another shot of the grove being worn in the crown stem.....



Fortunately, the contact is not much, and with the movement removed from the case, I was able to file out the tube "just a little", so that the stem no longer rubbed in this spot. Unfortunately, this is not an easy fix if you are not a watchmaker, and the contamination was so bad in mine that I suspect the crown seal would not have lasted another 6 months. So.................... I think Seiko is gonna have a problem, when all these seals start to leak. Of course its bean counter math at this point and if it (the seal) lasts longer then a year, Seiko wont have to worry about it, Eh? (I get tired of seeing bean counter math applied to watches, you know.)

So, if you got this grittyness in the crown as I have described (non-winding direction), and you got a warranty, USE IT! Use it NOW before the watch floods! Or wait until its just ready to expire (no diving), and get it into Seiko through Higuchi or Seiya-san. This is really a mess as I see it and although I would like to help anyone and everyone that has this problem, I`m sure I will not capable of fixing every watch that has this problem, nor can I warranty the watch after the fix, IE, if damage is done, its better to have Seiko replace the parts rather then the simple cleaning and clearancing I did.

One last note on this winding system before I get to the Sapphire crystal. If there is any real weakness in this system, it is that rocking transmision wheel and the coupling wheel in front of it. These parts are extreamly small for the tourqe they are having to deal with, only time will tell if this design is really going to be problem free in the years to come, I have my doubts (The 4s15 also uses this "rocker" winding design and they do develope problems when they are`nt serviced with some regularity.)

SCUBA Gets a SAPPHIRE!

As most everyone has seen, a sapphire crystal is available as a generic replacement for this case. It is not domed on the outside, but rather is flat on both sides. I like this better! A crystal that is domed on the outside, yet is flat on the inside, is the worst of both worlds when it comes to reflections. As everyone knows, the dome on top adds to the indirect reflections obsuring your view from the top. The resulting reflections are fairly negligable when the underside of the crystal has been domed also. But when the underside of the crystal is flat, you also get the "Total whiteout" effect caused by a direct reflection coming from the bottom side of the crystal. I would rather a crystal be domed on both sides, or flat on both sides. While I like the charector a domed crystal imparts to a watch, I have found that in almost all working enviorments, a flat crystal is better for actual veiwing. And so it is with great plesure that I got rid of the factory crystal for this double "Flat" sided sapphire crystal,

Installation of the SAP is pretty easy and if you have fitted a late model crystal that is using a plastic sealing gasket, it is the same procedure...........

Pop it out and press it in, but you should have a rock solid press, like the B&B professional press, as these require absolute precision when they are going in, or you`ll bugger the plastic gasket for sure.



Making sure the new SAP is in leval and flat.............



The one thing I like the most about this sapphire is the polished angle on it is exposed above the bezel insert, leading to a nice twinkle as the light hits it....... Its a bit more classier looking then the original because of this.



It also offers the bezel a little more protection from abuse and scratches, as it sits a little higher then the bezel.................



Nica-nica!
No gritty crown issues, and a crystal I dont have to worry about!

Oh ya, I did bump the "curb pins" (Regulator) towards fast a bit, and I`m happy to report that now, 24hrs later, it is +5 seconds fast! I can live with that until I see how it settles in.

And so with that I wrap up essays #`s 2 and 3. I hope you enjoyed it.
-------------------------------------------------

Writers NOTE: Since I posted this, I have worked on several Smore Scuba`s, and none of them have had the crown stem issue this one had. I guess my first one was just a lucky one,


Cheers,
Randall


________________________________________
Seikoholic #1
Dr.Seiko, Aka:2manywatches
Specializing in Seikology, Seikotherapy, and other Horological Dis-ease.
Made in the U.S.A.
....excellent clear pics - really good to see how things are done. I'm looking at doing the Time Zone on-line course so I can do more myself, particularly cleaning and lubing.

Regards,
Sweephand
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Joined: 3:38 AM - Jul 19, 2008

8:01 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #4

Seems like Seiko isn't paying as much attention to quality any more as opposed to profit

Apart from the manual winding bits in the 6r15; is there anything else that differentiates it from the 7s25/6?

-------------------------------------------
But I suspect it IS a 7s26 base plate!
To add a day display to it, all you have to do is drop a day wheel on it, the retaining clip for said day wheel, and use a dial with a date/date appeture, Its that simple,

What should be noted, about Seiko`s QC, and I dont think I was as clear as I could have been is: Although I saw this crown problem on this one watch, I have yet to see it again, and I`ve worked on at least a dozen of these modding them and so on.

One other note. Once again Seiko is proving that there is hardly a rhime or reason to the new Seiko caliber numbering system. When one caliber is made from another caliber, the watchmaker in me says it should retain the base caliber prefix it started with, such as "7"-"s". Seiko did this when they used a (four number(only) caliber #`ing system, such as 7000,7002,7005,7025. All of these calibers were based off the 7000 caliber. And they did this with previous 7s veriants, such as 7s25, 7s35, 7s36, ect. Why Seiko chose to re-nember this one to a "6"-"r" is anybody guess. And to add to the confusion about why Seiko does this, I just came accross another new 7s veriant called the 4r16. I can clearly see that it is a 7s base. Perhaps this is a marketing leason they learned from the Swiss,



Don, do you have any insites into the new direction Seiko numbering system is going?

Good topic for discussion on this Saterday morn,

BTW, Essay # 4 is primed and (not quite) ready, UNDER THE DIAL!

Cheers,
Randall


________________________________________
Seikoholic #1
Dr.Seiko, Aka:2manywatches
Specializing in Seikology, Seikotherapy, and other Horological Dis-ease.
Made in the U.S.A.
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Joined: 11:34 PM - Dec 04, 2008

9:29 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #5

the "new" calibre numbering system. I've started seeing some new movement calibres & had a hard time figuring how they came up w/ that number. I've not seen any new "protocol" or "code" written up online that describes the meaning of the different digits/letters - but if I do, I'll let you all know!

What I can do, is write up what the "classical" 4-digit "code" was & post it here.

But - 2 theories as to what's going on:

1. New generation of engineers, etc. in charge - and possibly the knowledge of the old system was not passed along to the new crowd in charge. OR - they don't agree w/ the old system & are making up a new one???

2. New marketing directives ["lesson from the Swiss" as you stated] came down to make the new movements seem like they're a new, radically different, design & stimulate some new interest & additional purchases from those who want to keep up w/ Seiko's "advances".

For "corporate culture" gurus:

1. One thing I do know: in the "old days" Seiko seemed to encourage competition between it's 2 divisions [Daini & Suwa]. Those 2 divisions did have their own "codes" or "conventions" for calibre naming [at least in part]. I mentioned this in one of my photo database postings this week.

Conjecture: maybe the apparent confusion in the modern calibre# system is due to several "competing" design teams working off the same base. Each team is using the calibre# system in some way to reflect their own team product.

2. Also, I don't know how "well organized" they are internally - or how "rigorously" written standards are adhered to currently. Some "engineering" corporations [definition here: any firm that designs, and maybe also builds, technical products] are "big" on written standards, while others are quite informal. There may be a well understood "naming convention" for new products that reflects some "logic". At a different firm, the new product # may be determined in a looser manner with no real adherence to a "system" or "logical code".

I guess we need to infiltrate Seiko's design/engineering operation & see for ourselves :>)

===============================================


Seiko Matsuda
The Patron Saint of Seiko Collectors
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Joined: 4:54 AM - Aug 19, 2008

9:57 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #6

the new entry level caliber and replace the 7sxx series. The 7sxx may still be around but found in the $500 Seiko '5' watches popping up every day.
There seem to be fewer differences between the 7sxx, 6r15 and 4r16 than any of the previous series of movements.

Of course this drastically reduces the number of different parts and assembly robots needed. All these new calibers could be conceivably be assemble for the most part, on the same assembly line.

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Joined: 4:54 AM - Aug 19, 2008

10:00 PM - Dec 13, 2008 #7

But I suspect it IS a 7s26 base plate!
To add a day display to it, all you have to do is drop a day wheel on it, the retaining clip for said day wheel, and use a dial with a date/date appeture, Its that simple,

What should be noted, about Seiko`s QC, and I dont think I was as clear as I could have been is: Although I saw this crown problem on this one watch, I have yet to see it again, and I`ve worked on at least a dozen of these modding them and so on.

One other note. Once again Seiko is proving that there is hardly a rhime or reason to the new Seiko caliber numbering system. When one caliber is made from another caliber, the watchmaker in me says it should retain the base caliber prefix it started with, such as "7"-"s". Seiko did this when they used a (four number(only) caliber #`ing system, such as 7000,7002,7005,7025. All of these calibers were based off the 7000 caliber. And they did this with previous 7s veriants, such as 7s25, 7s35, 7s36, ect. Why Seiko chose to re-nember this one to a "6"-"r" is anybody guess. And to add to the confusion about why Seiko does this, I just came accross another new 7s veriant called the 4r16. I can clearly see that it is a 7s base. Perhaps this is a marketing leason they learned from the Swiss,



Don, do you have any insites into the new direction Seiko numbering system is going?

Good topic for discussion on this Saterday morn,

BTW, Essay # 4 is primed and (not quite) ready, UNDER THE DIAL!

Cheers,
Randall


________________________________________
Seikoholic #1
Dr.Seiko, Aka:2manywatches
Specializing in Seikology, Seikotherapy, and other Horological Dis-ease.
Made in the U.S.A.
new Seiko watches with problems. Not just the Scuba but a lot of SKX divers are developing problems within days of being received.

I don't remember hearing all these complaints a year or two ago.

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Joined: 5:17 PM - Feb 05, 2007

12:31 AM - Apr 28, 2009 #8

Original date of posting: 06-17-2007


Well, as luck would have it, my Scuba started runing slow. I was sure it was going to do this, as it ran just to close to perfect! Break in is not some mysterious phenomena to me, it is a FACT. Break in is the result of the microsopic burnishing and polishing that most pivots and train gears go through in the first few weeks of a new movements life, allowing more power to get to the balance, resulting in a longer swing. This longer swing results in a longer period of time between beats, it is this longer period inbetween beats that causes the movement to slow down. When I first got the watch, she was runing a impressive +1/day over several days. But that soon started to slip to a negative figure, and within a few weeks it was -5 to -10/day. So last night I got the idea I wanted to regulate it, but then I thought why regulate it and not investigate that gritty crown? But then to add to that, I thought, why not go the hole she-bang and try and put that sapphire crystal in?





So........... Gritty crown goes first, LOL.

First, as has been pointed out before, there is some grittyness to be expected in this watch in the winding direction. This is because durring winding, the power flow must go THROUGH the "magic lever pawl wheel", otherwise known as a transmision wheel. It is the levers "pawls" being drug against the transmision wheel that give most handwinding Seiko`s that distinctive gritty feeling when winding and is not in and of itself a reason to be concerned, as long as this occures in the actual winding direction of the crown ONLY.



OK, thats all well and good. But the problem I had with this crown is that the crown feeling was just as gritty in the non-winding or reversing direction of the crown. I knew this to be "Not right" becasue of the way the 6s15 is made. You see, Seiko has designed this caliber with a "rocking" clutch wheel, instead of the more common wolfs teeth clutch that is found in most watches. Because of this, I knew that there should be absolutley NO feeling at all in the reversing direction, except maybe some slight drag caused by the gasket.

In this picture below, the winding bridge has been removed so that the winding rocker is exposed, note that the pawl wheel would be in that exposed jewel, but has also been removed so we can see the rocker parts under the pawl wheel..........................



As you can see above, in the reversing direction durring crown winding, the rocking transmision wheel gets pulled away from the "pawl wheel" essentually being allowed to "freewheel" in the non-winding direction. IE: There should be NO grittyness in this NON-winding direction of the crown!

And so I found pretty much what I thought I would find when I pulled the crown from the case....................................

A clearance issue with the tube.............................



Oh ohh! Not good, there is metal shavings on the seal! NOT GOOD!

Another shot of the grove being worn in the crown stem.....



Fortunately, the contact is not much, and with the movement removed from the case, I was able to file out the tube "just a little", so that the stem no longer rubbed in this spot. Unfortunately, this is not an easy fix if you are not a watchmaker, and the contamination was so bad in mine that I suspect the crown seal would not have lasted another 6 months. So.................... I think Seiko is gonna have a problem, when all these seals start to leak. Of course its bean counter math at this point and if it (the seal) lasts longer then a year, Seiko wont have to worry about it, Eh? (I get tired of seeing bean counter math applied to watches, you know.)

So, if you got this grittyness in the crown as I have described (non-winding direction), and you got a warranty, USE IT! Use it NOW before the watch floods! Or wait until its just ready to expire (no diving), and get it into Seiko through Higuchi or Seiya-san. This is really a mess as I see it and although I would like to help anyone and everyone that has this problem, I`m sure I will not capable of fixing every watch that has this problem, nor can I warranty the watch after the fix, IE, if damage is done, its better to have Seiko replace the parts rather then the simple cleaning and clearancing I did.

One last note on this winding system before I get to the Sapphire crystal. If there is any real weakness in this system, it is that rocking transmision wheel and the coupling wheel in front of it. These parts are extreamly small for the tourqe they are having to deal with, only time will tell if this design is really going to be problem free in the years to come, I have my doubts (The 4s15 also uses this "rocker" winding design and they do develope problems when they are`nt serviced with some regularity.)

SCUBA Gets a SAPPHIRE!

As most everyone has seen, a sapphire crystal is available as a generic replacement for this case. It is not domed on the outside, but rather is flat on both sides. I like this better! A crystal that is domed on the outside, yet is flat on the inside, is the worst of both worlds when it comes to reflections. As everyone knows, the dome on top adds to the indirect reflections obsuring your view from the top. The resulting reflections are fairly negligable when the underside of the crystal has been domed also. But when the underside of the crystal is flat, you also get the "Total whiteout" effect caused by a direct reflection coming from the bottom side of the crystal. I would rather a crystal be domed on both sides, or flat on both sides. While I like the charector a domed crystal imparts to a watch, I have found that in almost all working enviorments, a flat crystal is better for actual veiwing. And so it is with great plesure that I got rid of the factory crystal for this double "Flat" sided sapphire crystal,

Installation of the SAP is pretty easy and if you have fitted a late model crystal that is using a plastic sealing gasket, it is the same procedure...........

Pop it out and press it in, but you should have a rock solid press, like the B&B professional press, as these require absolute precision when they are going in, or you`ll bugger the plastic gasket for sure.



Making sure the new SAP is in leval and flat.............



The one thing I like the most about this sapphire is the polished angle on it is exposed above the bezel insert, leading to a nice twinkle as the light hits it....... Its a bit more classier looking then the original because of this.



It also offers the bezel a little more protection from abuse and scratches, as it sits a little higher then the bezel.................



Nica-nica!
No gritty crown issues, and a crystal I dont have to worry about!

Oh ya, I did bump the "curb pins" (Regulator) towards fast a bit, and I`m happy to report that now, 24hrs later, it is +5 seconds fast! I can live with that until I see how it settles in.

And so with that I wrap up essays #`s 2 and 3. I hope you enjoyed it.
-------------------------------------------------

Writers NOTE: Since I posted this, I have worked on several Smore Scuba`s, and none of them have had the crown stem issue this one had. I guess my first one was just a lucky one,


Cheers,
Randall


________________________________________
Seikoholic #1
Dr.Seiko, Aka:2manywatches
Specializing in Seikology, Seikotherapy, and other Horological Dis-ease.
Made in the U.S.A.
I am happy too have the chance to udersand what was happening when I bouught a 6r15 from Chuck,
When the watch came, it was nib and I had problems imedeatly /w the Grity Winding Crown?
Chuck was willing to take it back, but I wanted to try myself first, to have Seiko deal with it.

I soon found out from Seiko in NJ that they will take her in but than have to send her to Singapour? or werever Chuck was. As luck would have it, I ran across a servc. rep, Mrs Garcia
that told me to send it in, and she would either have the serv dpet look at it, or send it away.

I sent it to NJ and two weeks latter, recieved a letter that they decided to check it out, and two weeks after that I recieved a Fed Ex pkg /w the watch fixed or replaced?? and Chuck never had
to deal with it, I got out of it for $15.00 and had my Faith restored, that nothing is written in Stone, for what ever reason, Seiko mawah? NJ took responsibility, of a repair, of a watch that was purchased in a diffrent country.

I now understand what was going on, this post , explained in a way I can undersand w/ Pictures
for someone like myself, who has a hard time with the names of Transmission parts ect I finished reading the post ,and now Understand, Contamenation of a Gasket, how that would in time cuse a Flood, and leave with a Gift, the understanding of how this Grityness was effecting the watch.

This may be small patatoes for most but for me, it opens Doors to seeing the Picture that words alone,can't seem to do thanks Russell I
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