CITIZEN Brand - Master Entry

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Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 12:26 pm

December 30th, 2009, 9:55 am #11

Citizen introduced more modern designs for the time, no doubt aimed at a younger market segment, in 1970 as the Custom V2 line. The line included black cased
versions, known as 'Blackies', and even a wood cased version, known as 'Afrocraft'




1970 - Citizen Custom V2




1972 - Custom V2 Afrocraft




1970 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur.../~garaken/JW/CITI-A2.htm




1970 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/TEZ/TEZ-C30.htm




1970 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/TEZ/TEZ-C30.htm




1972 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/TEZ/TEZ-C20.htm




1973 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/TEZ/TEZ-C29.htm




1973 example, with faceted glass:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/TEZ/TEZ-C39.htm
Last edited by Sweephand on January 3rd, 2010, 8:10 am, edited 5 times in total.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 12:26 pm

December 30th, 2009, 9:59 am #12

]


Some
40 years ago, as the 1960's drew to a close, the development of
Citizen's automatic wrist watches was reaching its peak, in terms of
both range and quality. Around the middle of that decade the company
switched from it's geared 'jet' rotor design to the more reliable and
widely used oscillating weight type, and the late '60's saw the
launch of the Chrono Master high grade automatic alongside a range of
other new models.
In 1969 Citizen launched the evocatively named Leopard line, based on
the 7200 calibre. Although this movement was used in other models,
the Leopards were distinguished by one key characteristic not to be
found in the others – they were all high-beat, running at either
28,800 beats per hour (bph) or 36,000bph. These were Citizen's first
watches to run at these speeds, reflecting the quality and
reliability they could achieve by that time. These fine movements
also all feature a micro adjuster on the balance to assist with
accurate regulation.


In
a relatively short space of time the Leopard line offered an
extensive range of watches, with different jeweling, styles and price
points, and can perhaps be best described as 'upper mid' to 'high'
grade pieces.




Besides
the high-beat common denominator, the Leopards are also characterized
by their jewel counts, which are always even numbers – i.e. 28, 26,
24, and later in the production run, 22. Other models using the same
base movement usually carry odd number jewel counts, for example the
Custom V2 and Seven Star V2, with jewel counts of 25, 23, and 21 (the
only exception to this I can identify is calibre 7790, running at
21,600bph with 22, 24 and 26 jewels).




The
production run of the Leopards was short-lived – just as the
development of mechanical watches was reaching new heights, the
introduction of the much more accurate and soon the much cheaper
quartz module in the early to mid-1970's brought that development to
a halt. The latest Leopard movements entered the market in 1971, just
two years after the first model was introduced.





The
Movement Families:



Despite
the short production run, there was a degree of complexity to the movements used in the Leopards which fall
into two groups – the 7200 as per the first model, and the 7700
family used for the first time in 1971. Here
is the family tree for the 7200 series, showing the branches
for the 74xx and 76xx variants and the variations in the depths of
the different movements, all of which are 28.00mm wide. The Leopard
models are highlighted, although the bph rating also clearly
identifies them:


Note:
the day/date wheel captioned '72-3' in the diagram relates to one
model which has the day and date displayed in the same window at 12
o'clock on the dial.




The
7700, used in models from 1971, has a  less complex family tree, again the
Leopard high-beat movements are highlighted:








The
depth of the movements indicates whether the watch had
a date only window, a date and day window, or none of these. As far
as I am aware no Leopard sports separate day and date windows.




Here
is a summary of movement designations that I have been able to
identify so far, with jeweling and day / date complications:




Movement Number
Beats per Hour
Jeweling
No Date or Day
Date Only
Date and Day
7210
28,880
26






Yes

7210
28,800
24






Yes
7211
28,800
26






Yes
7220
28,800
26






Yes
7230
36,000
28






Yes
7420
28,800
26



Yes



7420
28,800
24



Yes



7430
36,000
28



Yes



7600
28,800
26
Yes






7710
28,800
22






Yes
7710
28,800
24






Yes
7710
28,800
26






Yes
7720
28,800
28



Yes



7730
36,000
28






Yes
7760
28,800
26






Yes
NB:
The model with a combined day and date window at the 12 o'clock
position uses the 7220 movement as indicated in the family tree, but
is designated '7800' on the case to differentiate it from other
models, not only because of its design but also because it has an
instant day and date change at midnight (see Schematic 3 below). The
model designation is confirmed in the 'museum' book which describes
this as a 72xx model, whilst the 7800 designation can be seen in the
dial code, as illustrated in this 1971 catalog picture:











Movement
Markings & Schematics:



The
movements are stamped near the balance with the movement
designation, whilst the rotors are signed 'Citizen' as well as the
jewel count - the micro adjuster on the balance cock can also be
seen:



Typical example of a 28,800 movement:
   And typical 36,000bph movement:
Example of the movement number and detail of the fine adjuster:





The following schematics show the architecture of the two movement types.



Schematic
1 – 72xx Movement, Rotor Side:




Schematic
2 – 72xx Movement, Dial Side

:





Schematic
3 – 7800 Variant, Dial Side:







Schematic
4 – 77xx Movement, Rotor Side:




Schematic
5 – 77xx, Dial Side:






Movement Features:
All movements are automatic of course, but they also hand wind and 'hack' (i.e. the second hand is stopped when the crown is pulled out to the hand setting position, to enable accurate synchronisation). Models with day and date complications are able to be quick set. The 77xx movements are unusual in that their quick set mechanism requires the watch to be held vertically (12 o'clock up) for the date to be set, then inverted (six o'clock up) to set the day, by pressing the crown whilst in its normal running position.


Dial
& Case Markings:


All
models have the Citizen logo applied beneath the 12 o'clock position,
usually with 'automatic' printed immediately below it.
Although
the iconic leaping cat Leopard logo is found on many models it is not
always present. However, when present it is either printed in black
on white or silver dials, or white on dark dials – black, blue,
grey or green for example. The logo is usually placed above the 6
o'clock position above any other markings on the lower half of the
dial. Models with the day and date window at 6 o'clock position have
their logo placed just below the 12 o'clock position.










Most models have their
jewel count printed centrally on the lower part of the dial. With the
exception of the top most model, see below, the dial is always marked
'Leopard' in an italicized upper case script, together with the speed
rating. This is either printed as the bph rating ('28800' or '36000')
or as the beats per second preceded by 'Superbeat' (i.e. 'Superbeat
8' or 'Superbeat 10'), whilst on some the text is restricted to
'Superbeat'.


Case backs are
conventionally stamped, showing model number, case type, serial
number and water resistant or 'parawater' (Leopards were produced at the time watch manufacturers were required to change from waterproof -'parawater' - to water resistant):













Crowns are usually
signed 'CTZ', but I have seen examples of the older 'C' signature:




The
Ultimate Leopard:




At the top of the
Leopard tree is the 'officially certified' chronometer version. Using
the 7230 movement, the factory adjustments were to Citizen's own
chronometer standards – an example of these standards can be found
in the Chrono Master (hand wind) article here http://seikoholics.yuku.c...24/Citizen-Chrono-Master The dial markings are unique to this model, and
include an Art Deco style logo applied above the six o'clock
position. The upper markings indicate the chronometer standard,
whilst '36000' or 'Superbeat 10' and 'automatic' accompany the
special logo:












Either silvery white (as above) or
grey dials appear to have been produced:












The case back features a
gold medallion version of the special logo in the centre, with
movement and case markings around the outer track:






Case
& Dial Styles:




As a result of the
extent of the Leopard range there is a considerable variety of case
and dial designs. A solid gold (18k) case was used, as was gold plate
but stainless steel is the most widely used material. Case shapes of
most types are seen – round, cushion, oval (on both axes) and rectangular, whilst some models, including the Chronometer featured
faceted glass. These are all illustrated in the gallery section.





Dials range from the
conventional classic type to coloured and textured types more typical
of 1970's design. A number of models feature a 'tail-less' second
hand, and there are a variety of day and date window positions
(although there were no models with separate day and date windows).
Again see the gallery section for examples of the different types.








Original
Prices:




As would be expected,
the higher beating chronometer models, at 36,000bph, were the most
expensive watches in the line up, typically (in 1971) retailing for
around JPY30,000. However, the most expensive model were the solid
gold versions, at JPY100,000. Gold plated models were generally
JPY1000 to JPY2000 more expensive than their stainless steel
counterparts.





The 36,000bph
non-chronometer models retailed for around the JPY25,000 mark, with
the cheapest 10 beat model costing JPY22,000.





The larger group of
28,800bph models retailed for between JPY14,000 and JPY19,000 for the
26 jeweled versions, whilst the 24 jeweled models were JPY15,000 or
JPY16,000. In this case the jewel count did not exactly match the
pricing hierarchy.





The 22 jewel models were
introduced later and the example I have seen from 1973 retailed for
JPY14,000.




Prices for individual
models can be seen in the following catalog scans, in the gallery
section.







Gallery:






This section contains
scans of the Leopards from Citizen's 1971 catalog, followed by a few
representative images of models from the range. Please ask if you
would like larger or individual scans of the catalog pages since I
have kept these on the small side for the purposes of this article:

The Chronometer models:



36,000bph models:



The 7800 variants:



The 28,800 range:





Finally here are some representative examples of the Leopard family:



 
  




  ( photo courtesy of Kumakun)             ( photo courtesy of Kumakun)  

                   


Sweephand   
Last edited by Sweephand on March 12th, 2011, 5:44 am, edited 18 times in total.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 12:26 pm

December 30th, 2009, 10:29 am #13

This version has a tachymeter bezel, on some it is plain. Also known as a 'TV Screen' chronograph:




Last edited by Sweephand on January 5th, 2010, 12:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 12:26 pm

December 30th, 2009, 10:31 am #14

From 1974, this model has a plain black bezel, others have a tachymeter. Also known as a 'TV Screen' chronograph:














Another example from 1974:




http://www.himawari.sakur.../~garaken/JW/CITI-A0.htm
Last edited by Sweephand on January 5th, 2010, 12:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Guest
Guest

December 30th, 2009, 11:31 am #15



Case:
Width w/crown - 39mm
Width w/o crown - 36mm
Length - 42mm
Depth - 11mm
Lug width -18mm
Crystal - Acrylic
8200A movement, 21 jewels, automatic, hand windable, 21,600bph, quick set day/date, day in English and Arabic

Guest
Guest

December 30th, 2009, 12:06 pm #16



Case:

Width w/crown - 43mm

Width w/out crown - 40mm

Length - 42mm

Depth - 12mm

Lug width - 20mm

Crystal - mineral glass
8200A, 21 jewels, auto, hand windable, 21,600bph, screw down crown, uni directional bezel, quick set day/date, day in English and Spanish
Last edited by Guest on December 30th, 2009, 12:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Guest
Guest

December 30th, 2009, 12:14 pm #17


Case:
Width w/crown - 43mm
Width w/out crown - 40mm
Length - 42mm
Depth - 12mm
Lug width - 20mm
Crystal - mineral glass
8200A,
21 jewels, auto, hand windable, 21,600bph, screw down crown, uni
directional bezel, quick set day/date, day in English and Arabic

Guest
Guest

December 30th, 2009, 12:26 pm #18


Case:

Width w/crown - 43mm

Width w/out crown - 40mm

Length - 42mm

Depth - 12mm

Lug width - 20mm

Crystal - mineral glass
8200A movement, 21 jewels, automatic, hand windable, 21,600bph, quick set day/date, day in English and Arabic

Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 2:01 pm

December 30th, 2009, 1:45 pm #19

Handwinding and auto model...


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Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 12:26 pm

December 30th, 2009, 3:40 pm #20

Along with the 'Homer' range of hand winders , the Newmaster was Citizen's line of simple non-automatic watches.




Example from Martback's collection




1960 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/JW/CITI-H40.htm




1971 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur.../~garaken/JW/CITI-H1.htm




1972 example:




http://www.himawari.sakur...~garaken/JW/CITI-H11.htm
Last edited by Sweephand on January 3rd, 2010, 9:19 am, edited 2 times in total.
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