Citizen Movement Question: Citizen Super King = Super Jet?

Citizen Movement Question: Citizen Super King = Super Jet?

Joined: December 31st, 2006, 10:08 am

January 25th, 2008, 12:22 pm #1

The design and the movement of the Citizen Super Jet is great, but these watches are expensive if you could find one.

Now I have seen an (ended) auction from Ebay, a Citizen Super King, which was sold for only 57,55 USD.

Is this movement (25 Jewels)


(copyright by ebay seller)

the same movement or same operating mode like in the Citizen Super Jet Auto Dater (39 Jewels)???


(copyright by www.nakahiro.parfait.ne.jp)


Cheers,

Ralf (watchbear-71)



"Man invented time, Seiko perfected it."
Last edited by watchbear-71 on January 25th, 2008, 12:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 3rd, 2007, 8:53 am

January 25th, 2008, 12:52 pm #2

but the internal cog autowind movement turns up in a lot of Citizen models like the Jet, Super Jet, Super King, New Master, Seven and perhaps also a few others. Not all of the automatic watches within these ranges have this movement so it is important to check in advance. I have seen everything from 17j to 39j so there seems to be a lot of choices but I am not sure if there are other technical differences except for the number of jewels.

/ mart

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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 10:08 am

January 25th, 2008, 1:35 pm #3

movement is not on each of these Citizen watches and must be checked every time.

Thanks for the info.

But if it has the movement like this Super King (pic 1) it was the same cog autowind movement as on the Super Jet movement (pic 2), but with less jewels???

It looks very similar for me, with less jewels and not in gold.

The Super Jet is much expensive, so I am on search for a cheaper Citizen with the same movement...

Cheers,

Ralf (watchbear-71)



"Man invented time, Seiko perfected it."
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Joined: October 3rd, 2007, 8:53 am

January 25th, 2008, 4:24 pm #4

without changing anything else. While the Seiko 603 caliber with 17j, 20j and 30j is a relatively modest example, the 64j and 100j movements seem a bit too much. Below is a link to some pictures of multi-jewelled calibers.

http://nakahiro.parfait.ne.jp/shasinkan/17.html

/ mart

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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 10:08 am

January 25th, 2008, 6:35 pm #5

I could not fancy me, that more than 30 Jewels as maximum make sense...

Thanks for the Link, Martin!

Cheers,

Ralf (watchbear-71)



"Man invented time, Seiko perfected it."
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Joined: August 17th, 2003, 11:02 am

January 25th, 2008, 9:28 pm #6

are relatively meaningless as indicators of movement quality & durability. Since the real purpose of jewels is to reduce wear in the movement, non-functional jewels do not contribute to movement durability - they are just there "for show". I've seen the pic of the 100 jewel Citizen before & it is impressive looking - but all those "extra" jewels are only there for esthetic purposes. It may be OK as a collector to get one as a "rarity" or "oddity", but as a serious watch wearer, don't think you're getting a better quality mvmt just because it has an exceptionally high jewel count.

Apparantly, this practice was done hundreds of years ago as well - I've read that horologists have studied some antique watches & clock watches in depth only to find that some of the jewels present are "ornamental" only!
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 10:08 am

January 25th, 2008, 11:17 pm #7

of these 100 jewels watches, Don.

I have read some time ago an very interesting article on Rich Askham´s blog "The Watch Spot" about the difference between the 17 and 27 jewels 4006 Bell-Matic movement (last post):

http://thewatchspot.blogspot.com/2007_0 ... chive.html

IMHO I would say that in fact only jewels which reduce the signs of wear or give a better accuracy are really reasonable...

Cheers,

Ralf (watchbear-71)



"Man invented time, Seiko perfected it."
Last edited by watchbear-71 on January 25th, 2008, 11:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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