What is the NOW!

Ardy
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Ardy
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Joined: 9:00 PM - Nov 03, 2015

5:18 AM - May 31, 2018 #1

Just heard a talk that hit on what I have been thinking for some time, that is what is the Now? We all know that the past is gone, the future unknown and the present impossible to grasp.

The physicist who was giving this talk said that time in its minimum (which we cannot measure) mathematically is 10 to the -44. Time is not linear and it is not measurable without some context, so in Einsteinian time there is no measure of time, nor in quantum field theory, so time is a construct of the human brain.

We cannot hold a concept of time passing as it does not exist, therefore to state that you are living in the NOW is false and what you are really doing is living whilst aware of the fact of living continuously, measure by immeasurable moments.
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crow
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7:07 AM - May 31, 2018 #2

I have no idea what what anybody else means by anything they say, but I do know what I mean.
When I refer to being in the NOW, I refer to being entirely aware, attentive, observant, and thought-free.
In short: invisible, and indistinguishable from the environment around me.


"Squawk!" said the crow, and then made space.
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Ardy
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11:43 AM - May 31, 2018 #3

Crow: Somewhat similar to what I stated in "living whilst aware of the fact of living continuously, measure by immeasurable moments". The only difference is that what you state is from the inside as opposed to mine which is from the outside.

There is no statement regarding the NOW that has any relevance to how you appear to live, if you think about it or don't think about it, which might be more relevant? The NOW is just a label to hang on nothing.

It is totally counter-intuitive that living like this actually reduces fear and allows all to surround you yet you are a part of it.
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crow
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6:10 PM - May 31, 2018 #4

It's a bit odd, wouldn't you say, that a physicist can use his mind to 'discover' that a 'mind-construct' doesn't exist?
I lost my reverence for scientists of all types, quite some time ago.



"Squawk!" said the crow, and then made space.
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Ardy
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11:02 PM - May 31, 2018 #5

Very odd but logical if you had heard the extended talk. He used a method of deduction of all uses of time and the impermanence of them and then it just left the idea that time is not fixed but a construct of the human mind.

He did say that there are several of his colleagues who disagree with him.

I too have lost most of my reverence for scientists over the last 20 years. It has become so political and manipulated, the idea we grew up with of the man in the white coat only interested in the testability of his science against all questioning and criticism is long gone.
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crow
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12:00 AM - Jun 01, 2018 #6

Well, apart from all of that: I have discovered from experience, that time is a very elastic, and sometimes entirely absent phenomenon, pointing to the rather obvious conclusion that it is, indeed, a subjective regulatory imposition, most likely a result of the human inclination to put absolutely everything under the illusion of human control.

That's one of my longest ever sentences :)

Further: even if time does exist, I have also discovered that I can - in emergencies - step right outside of its linear flow, and operate in some completely different continuum.

As for science: even a mind-construct can sometimes arrive at a theory that is accurate, even though the means of arriving at a true conclusion is by way of a mind-construct.
In other words: science may sometimes deliver truth by accident.



"Squawk!" said the crow, and then made space.
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Ardy
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5:33 AM - Jun 01, 2018 #7

Hi Crow: Thanks for that, makes sense to me.

A comment: I read an article on people who survived huge falls from mountains and in one case from a plane. The stories are all the same, time slowed right down and the fear of death left them.
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