Ladywood closing at end of school year.

A place to discuss high school football as it pertains to the Detroit CHSL.

Moderator: Boeing747

aloyouis
Sophomore
aloyouis
Sophomore
Joined: January 20th, 2016, 9:07 am

January 31st, 2018, 11:29 am #11

Boeing747 wrote:
aloyouis wrote: Did you delete my post due to politics?  

Everything in that post was FACTUAL.  All verifiable and sourceable.  

The economics of the state play the LARGEST ROLE in Catholic school enrollment.  This thread is about a Catholic school closing due to enrollment issues.  How do you justify censorship over it?

Are we supposed to ignore the elephant in the room?
Yes, because your specific political comments were unnecessary and did not add to the conversation.

Demographics play a larger role than economics - no kids, no school. The demographic trend-line for children in metro Detroit does not look good as the general population ages, at least for the next 8-10 years. Since you're a former De La Salle parent, let's look at De La Salle: their enrollment peak was in 2007-2008 at around 875, after Harper Woods Notre Dame and St. Clement had closed and their competition in Macomb County was minimal. Since then, they have seen their enrollment slowly decline down to around 750 this year. Their incoming freshman classes the last three years has gone from 210 to 185 to 165. That is demographics.

A number of the schools have made efforts to make the school more accessible through tuition assistance and to get more students from public schools, but when the pie gets smaller, the competition for kids gets more cutthroat.
Demographics for this region have been DRIVEN by economics.  The economics have been driven by very poor fiscal policy from 2002-10 (Granholm) and 2008-16 (Obama).  That isn't "political", it is fact.  That has changed with Snyder and Trump.  People have more opportunity and wages are rising.  This, more than anything else drives a regions demographics.  Better jobs and higher wages = more ability to pay for Catholic education.  
You read my post before unilaterally censoring it.  
Quote
Like
Share

tommiegun80
All-Area
Joined: May 4th, 2003, 7:58 am

January 31st, 2018, 12:29 pm #12

So which catholic school is coming back to life?
Quote
Like
Share

aloyouis
Sophomore
aloyouis
Sophomore
Joined: January 20th, 2016, 9:07 am

January 31st, 2018, 12:32 pm #13

tommiegun80 wrote: So which catholic school is coming back to life?
I think we will see schools get healthier first. There is capacity due to the economic recession that Michigan is coming out of now.

Certainly De La Salle Collegiate will continue to grow as well as the New Catholic high school in northern Macomb County.
Quote
Like
Share

Boeing747
All-State
Boeing747
All-State
Joined: May 21st, 2003, 4:49 am

January 31st, 2018, 12:52 pm #14

aloyouis wrote:
Boeing747 wrote:
aloyouis wrote: Did you delete my post due to politics?  

Everything in that post was FACTUAL.  All verifiable and sourceable.  

The economics of the state play the LARGEST ROLE in Catholic school enrollment.  This thread is about a Catholic school closing due to enrollment issues.  How do you justify censorship over it?

Are we supposed to ignore the elephant in the room?
Yes, because your specific political comments were unnecessary and did not add to the conversation.

Demographics play a larger role than economics - no kids, no school. The demographic trend-line for children in metro Detroit does not look good as the general population ages, at least for the next 8-10 years. Since you're a former De La Salle parent, let's look at De La Salle: their enrollment peak was in 2007-2008 at around 875, after Harper Woods Notre Dame and St. Clement had closed and their competition in Macomb County was minimal. Since then, they have seen their enrollment slowly decline down to around 750 this year. Their incoming freshman classes the last three years has gone from 210 to 185 to 165. That is demographics.

A number of the schools have made efforts to make the school more accessible through tuition assistance and to get more students from public schools, but when the pie gets smaller, the competition for kids gets more cutthroat.
Demographics for this region have been DRIVEN by economics.  The economics have been driven by very poor fiscal policy from 2002-10 (Granholm) and 2008-16 (Obama).  That isn't "political", it is fact.  That has changed with Snyder and Trump.  People have more opportunity and wages are rising.  This, more than anything else drives a regions demographics.  Better jobs and higher wages = more ability to pay for Catholic education.  
You read my post before unilaterally censoring it.  
People have been leaving Michigan since the 1970s, regardless of which political party has been in office in Washington or Lansing. 
Quote
Like
Share

ez57
Sophomore
ez57
Sophomore
Joined: June 12th, 2012, 9:59 am

February 1st, 2018, 2:04 pm #15

I don't know what part Granholm or Obama politics play in the decline of the Catholic school system. I would bet that stupid pope statue they built in DC didnt help matters much. The only other caveat to declining population I would add is that many people can't afford 10k+ tuition bills. Guys like me who paid half of their tuition to attend CC are not their today. When I was growing up every community even many poor and working class communities had a variety of Catholic school options from kindergarten to senior year. Today it seems that the Catholic schools are only for the very well off.
Quote
Like
Share

77
Junior
77
Junior
Joined: October 21st, 2012, 9:10 pm

February 8th, 2018, 6:21 am #16

ez57 wrote: I don't know what part Granholm or Obama politics play in the decline of the Catholic school system. I would bet that stupid pope statue they built in DC didnt help matters much. The only other caveat to declining population I would add is that many people can't afford 10k+ tuition bills.   Guys like me who paid half of their tuition to attend CC are not their today. When I was growing up every community even many poor and working class communities had a variety of Catholic school options from kindergarten  to senior year. Today it seems that the Catholic schools are only for the very well off.

Yup. ^^^^^ What this guy said.

Our churches need to prioritize our schools. Cut back on diocesan administration, bring back our Sisters, and make Catholic School affordable. We also need to prioritize the “Catholic” in Catholic Schools, instead of them just being another rich persons private sports school.
Quote
Like
Share

aloyouis
Sophomore
aloyouis
Sophomore
Joined: January 20th, 2016, 9:07 am

February 8th, 2018, 4:12 pm #17

77 wrote:
ez57 wrote: I don't know what part Granholm or Obama politics play in the decline of the Catholic school system. I would bet that stupid pope statue they built in DC didnt help matters much. The only other caveat to declining population I would add is that many people can't afford 10k+ tuition bills.   Guys like me who paid half of their tuition to attend CC are not their today. When I was growing up every community even many poor and working class communities had a variety of Catholic school options from kindergarten  to senior year. Today it seems that the Catholic schools are only for the very well off.

Yup.    ^^^^^ What this guy said.

Our churches need to prioritize our schools. Cut back on diocesan administration, bring back our Sisters, and make Catholic School affordable. We also need to prioritize the “Catholic” in Catholic Schools, instead of them just being another rich persons private sports school.
The politics of our state and region have a major impact on the economy which in turn impacts the ability for people to choose to spend $ on Catholic schools.  Why is this a hard concept to comprehend?  You demand that the Catholic schools make "Catholic School Affordable".  It appears they already do it for FAR less than the public schools get paid from the state.  Funding from the state ranges from $7700 - $15000 per pupil BEFORE the local millages.  In my district, the local millage is over $27 MILLION per year.  Keep in mind that this should be compared not only to what you see as the Catholic HS costs (11K for my daughter), but also for the te K-8 costs which are WAY lower and also consider that most Catholic Schools offer substantial discounts for more than 1 child per family.  For most Catholic schools, they educate for far less than the public schools.  
Quote
Like
Share

77
Junior
77
Junior
Joined: October 21st, 2012, 9:10 pm

February 8th, 2018, 6:33 pm #18

aloyouis wrote:
77 wrote:
ez57 wrote: I don't know what part Granholm or Obama politics play in the decline of the Catholic school system. I would bet that stupid pope statue they built in DC didnt help matters much. The only other caveat to declining population I would add is that many people can't afford 10k+ tuition bills.   Guys like me who paid half of their tuition to attend CC are not their today. When I was growing up every community even many poor and working class communities had a variety of Catholic school options from kindergarten  to senior year. Today it seems that the Catholic schools are only for the very well off.

Yup.    ^^^^^ What this guy said.

Our churches need to prioritize our schools. Cut back on diocesan administration, bring back our Sisters, and make Catholic School affordable. We also need to prioritize the “Catholic” in Catholic Schools, instead of them just being another rich persons private sports school.
The politics of our state and region have a major impact on the economy which in turn impacts the ability for people to choose to spend $ on Catholic schools.  Why is this a hard concept to comprehend?  You demand that the Catholic schools make "Catholic School Affordable".  It appears they already do it for FAR less than the public schools get paid from the state.  Funding from the state ranges from $7700 - $15000 per pupil BEFORE the local millages.  In my district, the local millage is over $27 MILLION per year.  Keep in mind that this should be compared not only to what you see as the Catholic HS costs (11K for my daughter), but also for the te K-8 costs which are WAY lower and also consider that most Catholic Schools offer substantial discounts for more than 1 child per family.  For most Catholic schools, they educate for far less than the public schools.  
Yes, they do educate for far less, and its still too expensive. My kids attend a Catholic School btw.... And i make it by. But, it should be free, paid for by the diocese in my opinion.
Quote
Like
Share