Zone of squareness

Zone of squareness

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

February 13th, 2011, 12:26 am #1

How about this:


Any Bertholites out there who can do that with a driver?
I find Dustin's swing rather fascinating. There is a lot going on there!

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 28th, 2003, 12:59 pm

February 13th, 2011, 3:13 am #2

be a lot going on there but here is an interesting question? Does one of the longest hitters in golf hit his driver with an ascending, descending or level impact? Does he conform to today's impact science?
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

February 13th, 2011, 3:15 am #3

How about this:


Any Bertholites out there who can do that with a driver?
I find Dustin's swing rather fascinating. There is a lot going on there!

Regards, Herbert
of his ilk square the club face well before impact by bowing the lead wrist using flexion. Its hard to see in the first frames as it is face-on, but you can really see it in the last three frames. Look how the lead wrist remains bowed (and locked into place) so far after impact. If Dustin had squared the club face before impact by releasing early , you would see the shaft pass his lead forearm in the last frame instead of still being mostly in-line with it. If he had used pure supination to square the club face you'd see the back of his trail hand in the last frame instead of being very close to that of the impact position.

I'm more and more falling in line with Kelvin Miyahira's school of thought that using flexion, supination, and ulnar deviation of the lead wrist before and through impact is more important than concentrating solely on lag to get the hands ahead of the ball at impact. I'm getting some really good results by practicing this move ... more so than with the last 16 months with Bertholy. I'll post some video as soon as we're out of the arctic grip.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 13th, 2011, 1:21 pm #4

be a lot going on there but here is an interesting question? Does one of the longest hitters in golf hit his driver with an ascending, descending or level impact? Does he conform to today's impact science?
It looks like he is about level, maybe slightly ascending...would need the actual Trackman data to be sure:



I love the level head through the Impact zone.

It is curious though the average PGA tour player, in spite of what is known about attack angles and distance, hits their drive with a descending angle of attack:

http://blog.swingmangolf.com/files/trac ... tances.pdf

Kevin

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence"

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 13th, 2011, 3:54 pm #5

of his ilk square the club face well before impact by bowing the lead wrist using flexion. Its hard to see in the first frames as it is face-on, but you can really see it in the last three frames. Look how the lead wrist remains bowed (and locked into place) so far after impact. If Dustin had squared the club face before impact by releasing early , you would see the shaft pass his lead forearm in the last frame instead of still being mostly in-line with it. If he had used pure supination to square the club face you'd see the back of his trail hand in the last frame instead of being very close to that of the impact position.

I'm more and more falling in line with Kelvin Miyahira's school of thought that using flexion, supination, and ulnar deviation of the lead wrist before and through impact is more important than concentrating solely on lag to get the hands ahead of the ball at impact. I'm getting some really good results by practicing this move ... more so than with the last 16 months with Bertholy. I'll post some video as soon as we're out of the arctic grip.
he sets his hands early in the takeaway and bows that wrist at TOS. After that it is all body:



Kevin

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence"

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

February 13th, 2011, 5:07 pm #6

He also is pretty much toe up halfway back in frame 1 but is completely shut at the top as you noted due to the bowed lead wrist. Halfway down in frame 3 he is pretty much toe up again. Very interesting. It looks to me that he has flattened his lead wrist a bit and also flattened his swing plane getting his forearms into a position where they can rotate through the ball. It looks like is getting his trail wrist bent back in SA position at the top and then keeping it there all the way through the ball. Bowing the lead wrist is one way to accomplish that.

Then we see his finish position in frame 4. Any of you guys able to do that? I find that I hit the ball straighter when I try to get that finish body position with the upper body still angled in essentially hitting position. Getting to frame 3 at the finish pretty much guarantees a 'good' impact position as far as maintaining spine angle goes... Also if I do it 'correctly' my back feels good after. The problem is more in the lead knee and hip. LOL I am probably to old to be fooling around with this stuff...


Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

February 13th, 2011, 5:16 pm #7

It looks like he is about level, maybe slightly ascending...would need the actual Trackman data to be sure:



I love the level head through the Impact zone.

It is curious though the average PGA tour player, in spite of what is known about attack angles and distance, hits their drive with a descending angle of attack:

http://blog.swingmangolf.com/files/trac ... tances.pdf

Kevin

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence"

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
I started to try to put together a sequence like that but decide that it was too much trouble! I does look to be fairly level to me but as you mentioned a launch monitor would tell. I did look around for a biz hub impact sequence for Dustin but could not find one.

This guy has so much speed that he does not need to optimize launch conditions. I would think that accuracy is his biggest concern and his motion looks like it is geared towards accuracy. He does use a 10.5 degree driver which is interesting.

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 13th, 2011, 5:39 pm #8

He also is pretty much toe up halfway back in frame 1 but is completely shut at the top as you noted due to the bowed lead wrist. Halfway down in frame 3 he is pretty much toe up again. Very interesting. It looks to me that he has flattened his lead wrist a bit and also flattened his swing plane getting his forearms into a position where they can rotate through the ball. It looks like is getting his trail wrist bent back in SA position at the top and then keeping it there all the way through the ball. Bowing the lead wrist is one way to accomplish that.

Then we see his finish position in frame 4. Any of you guys able to do that? I find that I hit the ball straighter when I try to get that finish body position with the upper body still angled in essentially hitting position. Getting to frame 3 at the finish pretty much guarantees a 'good' impact position as far as maintaining spine angle goes... Also if I do it 'correctly' my back feels good after. The problem is more in the lead knee and hip. LOL I am probably to old to be fooling around with this stuff...


Regards, Herbert
your lead knee and hip would be fine (note he keeps his lead knee flexed and lead foot 'anchored'. If you're developing arthritis (as I am) you'll feel it but you'd feel it more if you straightened the lead leg.

Peter
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

February 13th, 2011, 6:00 pm #9

he sets his hands early in the takeaway and bows that wrist at TOS. After that it is all body:



Kevin

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence"

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
really matter when the lead wrist gets bowed in the DS ... just important that it does, IMHO. Once the wrist is bowed to that degree, you can't flip the club into the ball or easily roll the wrists to get club head speed. It's pretty much has to be driven by the body at that point. Dustin of course utilized tremendous body speed to get his distance. Graeme McDowell utilizes the same bowed wrist technique, albeit later in the DS, but drives the ball 20 yds short of Johnson due to less body speed/rotation. Jamie Sadlowski also employs the bowed wrist, but possesses freakish body speed to drive it 100 yds past Johnson. The bowed wrist allows Sadlowski excellent accuracy for his driving distance.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 14th, 2011, 1:23 pm #10

for us mere mortals to set it before the downswing begins don't you think? You said something else too that I think bears comment:
"....using flexion, supination, and ulnar deviation of the lead wrist before and through impact is more important than concentrating solely on lag to get the hands ahead of the ball at impact. I'm getting some really good results by practicing this move ... more so than with the last 16 months with Bertholy"
First that is awesome that you continue to improve. But you gotta ask yourself...how far do you think you would have gotten with this new move had you not first developed a good Vital/Master move, improved your strength and flexibility, and your understanding of the golf swing as you worked?

It's sorta like me saying "I have added more speed in the last 4 months using the speed chain than my previous three years with Bertholy". That is true, but again where was the foundation laid for that speed? The idea that the exercises condition your body to "accept the fine golf swing" is lost sometimes as we continue to improve.

Something to consider....Whenever I find some aspect of my swing I need improving, I always do it within then framework of The Blueprint/Bertholy exercises. Last winter I worked on improving the set at top of swing as I made the Vital Move. This winter I have been focused on improving my forward lean/maintaining my spine angle and improving my "tush line". Though my swing is built and is a habit, there are always tweaks and improvements that can be made. So when adding in an improvement, I want to take care that I don't "over write" the existing structure/habit. By working within the framework of my basic swing and the exercises, I ensure this.

Now let's go to the other side. Imagine a player with an over the top move...typical shoulder roll and casting...and he doesn't make the move to the lead side very well at all. Now he reads about this "bowed lead wrist and ulnar deviation"....he gets all excited and begins focusing on it. How do you think it will go? Unless he fixes his swing with The Vital Move and the trail elbow seeking his navel, he is still going to have difficulty achieving a good impact position, no matter how much he bows that lead wrist.

The bowed lead wrist move is a component to the overall structure of the swing you have spent 16 months building - I suggest you are seeing the results with this new move because of the work you have put in previously.

Kevin

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence"

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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