Stack & Tilt vs. SA

Stack & Tilt vs. SA

Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

May 29th, 2010, 9:12 pm #1

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
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gsw
Joined: July 27th, 2000, 11:22 pm

May 30th, 2010, 8:03 pm #2

If he has then have him split his hands on the grip and swing like he is hitting the hockey puck.



It works for me.


Stan
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Joined: January 6th, 2004, 8:10 am

June 1st, 2010, 2:03 pm #3

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
Sounds like he should invest in improving his flexibility first rather than experimenting with different swing systems - stretching, yoga, Pilates....From your description, in his current state he's not going to be very successful with any of them.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

June 1st, 2010, 7:47 pm #4

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
just do a program that will teach him the absolute fundamentals found in all good swings, AND increases his flexibility, AND improves his strength and fitness, AND provides a means to check his progress to make sure he is practicing correctly....all for less than the cost of one golf lesson! Of course it adapts and compliments any swing "method" many of which do not teach how to obtain the absolutes.

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence" does all this and more as it integrates both solid swing mechanics and solid mental game approach. The third edition now includes a section on speed training for developing maximum club heed speed and distance once the basic swing has been built.

Lots of good reportson my site and over at the forum. Just regular guys like all of us making good steady progress by following the program.

Kevin


Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

June 1st, 2010, 8:42 pm #5

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
attempts to simplify the swing by removing weight shift from the swing. SA attempts to simplify the swing by removing the need to rotate the club head to square it by impact (some SA methods also try to remove the use of the lower body ... with disastrous effects.)

In the long run, I believe that the SA grip has more benefit to the casual golfer than does the S&T method as the inability to square the club head has more ill affects than does problems with weight shift. I would steer this fellow towards IMA as it is pretty much a CG swing with an SA grip.

However, neither of these methods teach lead/lag per se and IMHO are therefore inadequate and incomplete by themselves. Unfortunately, if your friend is unwilling to spend the time to learn SA or S&T, then he will never go for the training regimen required to learn lead/lag.
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Joined: April 18th, 2010, 8:26 pm

June 1st, 2010, 9:05 pm #6

just do a program that will teach him the absolute fundamentals found in all good swings, AND increases his flexibility, AND improves his strength and fitness, AND provides a means to check his progress to make sure he is practicing correctly....all for less than the cost of one golf lesson! Of course it adapts and compliments any swing "method" many of which do not teach how to obtain the absolutes.

"A Blueprint For Golf Excellence" does all this and more as it integrates both solid swing mechanics and solid mental game approach. The third edition now includes a section on speed training for developing maximum club heed speed and distance once the basic swing has been built.

Lots of good reportson my site and over at the forum. Just regular guys like all of us making good steady progress by following the program.

Kevin


Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
I seen some of your site. Are you a certified instructor?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 1st, 2010, 9:46 pm #7

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
SA would involve more changes (grip is a big one for most). Beyond that they could adopt BGG or IMA Impact Backwards Drill #5 which are both full featured swings with 'no weight shift' (and without the 'false' direction to tilt your torso towards the target).

Peter
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

June 2nd, 2010, 3:22 am #8

I seen some of your site. Are you a certified instructor?
while meaningful and needed in some disciplines (I wouldn't contract an unschooled and unlicensed architect to design my 10,000 square foot dream home!), they often don't amount to of a hill of beans when it comes to golf instruction. Obtaining PGA professional or Certified Natural Golf Instructor credentials is no doubt a great golfing accomplishment, but it doesn't mean the pro is able to help golfers swing better and play better. It just means they have met the requirements for whatever organization it is they are "certified" in.

Whether or not they are a good teacher is determined by how much the student improves. If the student improves, he will not care if the teacher is certified or not, will he? Of course not! He is just glad he is seeing improvement, building a better swing, and playing a better game.

It gives me great joy and satisfaction to hear reports from people who have read my book, apply it's principles, and through work and dedication, take their swing and game to levels they never could previously. That's what gets my motor running. Among my students are many who are lifelong golfers and have "bought it all, tried it all" to no avail....then they get my teaching and bingo they see nice improvement. This is what they say...not me. One of our members here, a very accomplished (perhaps the most accomplished among our forum members) lifelong golfer of 50+ years who plays close to scratch, has said that my book is the best he has ever read in his 50+ years of golf! Now that's saying something. I have more than a few who have reached personal milestones in their swing and game since buying my book and working it's program.

So I guess I am "certified" in The Blueprint For Golf Excellence...it is in fact the very program and exercises I used (and am using) to go from a 100's shooter to a 70's shooter, and hopefully someday get to scratch. That's my credentials, along with the positive experience my students report. So that's a long answer to your question, and still for some that it isn't enough. Some need to have a book written by a famous golfer, or will only take lessons from a "real professional". I say good for them! Plenty of those to choose from!

Kevin



Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: December 2nd, 2002, 7:44 pm

June 2nd, 2010, 1:36 pm #9

I have a friend who is trying to learn NG. I'm not real confident that he will get it before he gives up. He took a lesson but whatever, I'm pretty sure he will soon be looking again. He's an athletic guy but a poor golfer. Stands up straight, not much body turn, try to control with his hands. He has less than ideal flexibility in his back. Who doesn't, LOL!

For a CG'er, how does learning S&T compare to learning SA?

He loves to fold his lead arm on the backswing. Maybe he should talk to Jack Kuykendall?
Does anyone here on this board use Jack K's swing ? Also I hear he has a new one now, anyone know anything about it ?

I remember there use to be several guys using Jack's swings that posted here on the board.
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gsw
Joined: July 27th, 2000, 11:22 pm

June 2nd, 2010, 6:14 pm #10

While I dont use JKs swing exactly I do bend my lead arm to make my back swing and that modification to keep from making a turn due to my bad back was inspired by Lever Power Golf (LPG). I have a video of LPG that I bought from Jack K. before he found out that I actually could think for myself and was not going to follow his swing philosophy exactly as he preached it. He banned me from his web site after he found out that I make posts here on the SA forum.

Stan
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