Speaking of Science - 'Science and Golf V'

Speaking of Science - 'Science and Golf V'

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 30th, 2009, 8:57 pm #1

I just got 'Science and Golf V - Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf' which has the papers from the 2008 congress. Quite a few interesting papers were published and presented including:

o A Kinematic and Kinetic Analyses of the Modern and Stabilized-Spine Golf Swings
o Segment Interaction: Sequencing and Timing in the Downswing
o Understanding Golf Club Control Through Grip Pressure Measurement
o Weight Transfer Time Moderation By Golf Handicap
o Rhythmic Force Patterns in the Golf Swing
o Kinetic Analysis in Rotational Movement During the Golf Swing
o Golfer Performance: Amateurs vs. Pros
o Brain Activity in a Golf Putting Task: The Effect of Skill Level
o Movement Kinematics of the Golfer's "Yips"
o Mathematical Comparison of Swing Planes With and Without the Explanar Trainer

66 papers in total.

I'll post here any interesting things I find as I go through them.

Peter

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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

January 31st, 2009, 1:29 am #2

Weight Transfer Time Moderation By Golf Handicap.

Do low handicap golfers tend to have a more forcefull and earlier weight shift than high handicapers?

JC
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

January 31st, 2009, 2:22 am #3

I just got 'Science and Golf V - Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf' which has the papers from the 2008 congress. Quite a few interesting papers were published and presented including:

o A Kinematic and Kinetic Analyses of the Modern and Stabilized-Spine Golf Swings
o Segment Interaction: Sequencing and Timing in the Downswing
o Understanding Golf Club Control Through Grip Pressure Measurement
o Weight Transfer Time Moderation By Golf Handicap
o Rhythmic Force Patterns in the Golf Swing
o Kinetic Analysis in Rotational Movement During the Golf Swing
o Golfer Performance: Amateurs vs. Pros
o Brain Activity in a Golf Putting Task: The Effect of Skill Level
o Movement Kinematics of the Golfer's "Yips"
o Mathematical Comparison of Swing Planes With and Without the Explanar Trainer

66 papers in total.

I'll post here any interesting things I find as I go through them.

Peter
Say Peter,

I believe that in the past you have mentioned that certain parts of the body (hands?) move faster during impact then is possible by muscle contraction? I am curious what muscles we are talking about?

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2009, 4:29 pm #4

The muscles in your forearms that produce movement of the hands. In the study the observed hand hand motion during just prior to impact of a professional golfer was faster that could be produced by contraction of the relevant muscles.

Peter
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

January 31st, 2009, 5:38 pm #5

So, if I forcefully hit at the ball with my hands I will get less clubhead speed then if I have passive hands and I get into late hit position allowing the clubhead to release on it's own?

It seems to me then that this does not then rule out using the trail triceps muscles to add power late in the downswing by straightening the trial arm.

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

January 31st, 2009, 6:21 pm #6

"The one place where there can be no deviation from the basic positions and movements is in regard to the INVIOLATE CLAW in the impact position. Here at this most critical of positions and movements there must be PURITY OF TECHNIQUE. The right arm must not straighten at impact. The CLAW will be maintained except for a strong hitting action in the right hand. The right hand hits very strongly as all the pent up enrgy is unleashed at the ball, while the bent position of the right elbow is maintained. This strong right hand hit is strictly involuntary....."
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2009, 6:43 pm #7

Weight Transfer Time Moderation By Golf Handicap.

Do low handicap golfers tend to have a more forcefull and earlier weight shift than high handicapers?

JC
'Weight Transfer TIme Moderation By Golf Handicap'

Worsfold, Smith & Dyson

DISCUSSION

...In this study the low handicap, more experienced golfers demonstrated significantly slower weight transfer times with the driver and both the 3 iron and 7 iron. This finding is thought to indicate that the more experienced golfers are better able to control the powerful torques generated during the club swing process....

APPLICATION

Coaches and golfers should note that a slower controlled weight transfer is adopted by low handicap players, and consider integrating those research findings within training and coaching.


Note - Low handicap were golfers in the study with handicaps between 0 and 7.

Peter
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2009, 6:51 pm #8

So, if I forcefully hit at the ball with my hands I will get less clubhead speed then if I have passive hands and I get into late hit position allowing the clubhead to release on it's own?

It seems to me then that this does not then rule out using the trail triceps muscles to add power late in the downswing by straightening the trial arm.

Regards, Herbert
to a previous poster: you can certainly choose to swing in a way that uses the trail triceps as a power source. You just will not get as much clubhead speed at impact as you might with other ways of swinging the club. Reference another study from Science and Golf I.

Peter
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2009, 6:56 pm #9

"The one place where there can be no deviation from the basic positions and movements is in regard to the INVIOLATE CLAW in the impact position. Here at this most critical of positions and movements there must be PURITY OF TECHNIQUE. The right arm must not straighten at impact. The CLAW will be maintained except for a strong hitting action in the right hand. The right hand hits very strongly as all the pent up enrgy is unleashed at the ball, while the bent position of the right elbow is maintained. This strong right hand hit is strictly involuntary....."

Peter
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2009, 7:19 pm #10

I just got 'Science and Golf V - Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf' which has the papers from the 2008 congress. Quite a few interesting papers were published and presented including:

o A Kinematic and Kinetic Analyses of the Modern and Stabilized-Spine Golf Swings
o Segment Interaction: Sequencing and Timing in the Downswing
o Understanding Golf Club Control Through Grip Pressure Measurement
o Weight Transfer Time Moderation By Golf Handicap
o Rhythmic Force Patterns in the Golf Swing
o Kinetic Analysis in Rotational Movement During the Golf Swing
o Golfer Performance: Amateurs vs. Pros
o Brain Activity in a Golf Putting Task: The Effect of Skill Level
o Movement Kinematics of the Golfer's "Yips"
o Mathematical Comparison of Swing Planes With and Without the Explanar Trainer

66 papers in total.

I'll post here any interesting things I find as I go through them.

Peter
As a follow on to Budney and Bellow this study was of obvious interest.

...Although Budney (1979) shed light on the nature of grip forces, refuting much of the golf instructional advice, he did not evaluate forces and pressuresacross various golf clubs, nor did he link these forces to club control....

A wide-array of grip pressure signatures are emerging as data are collected on amateur, or lesser skilled golfers. Many of these signatures likely reflect and thus expose, specific swing faults...

o Compared to low handicap golfers, amateurs usually apply greater force to the club with their right hands during the downswing when compared to low handicap golfers...

o Releasse of the club with the right hand at impact was seen in a select few low handicap golfers, but has yet to be observed in amateurs with higher handicaps (index over 10).

....

Can a golfer with with weak hands control their club adequately, given that our club professional used over 70% of his grip strength to swing his driver?


Peter
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