PT for Bertholy-ites

PT for Bertholy-ites

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 18th, 2010, 6:30 pm #1

It always amazes me how slow PT actually is but how much better the results when you keep to it. I went back to the one-two-three count at the range as I was practicing driver off the deck and it made a tremendous difference.

Peter
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

June 18th, 2010, 8:02 pm #2

with most tour pro's who have an average 1 second swing from start of BS to impact with an average .75 seconds to top of BS and .25 seconds from there to impact. PT yes ... slow, not hardly.

Compare this to the am who has an average 1.5 second BS but the same .25 second DS. At this tempo the DS does indeed seem rushed. IMHO, the answer isn't to slow down the DS. When you speed up the first part of the BS, it quite remarkably seems like you suddenly have a ton of time left over for the transition. I know it seems counterintuitive, but it does work.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

June 18th, 2010, 8:55 pm #3

It always amazes me how slow PT actually is but how much better the results when you keep to it. I went back to the one-two-three count at the range as I was practicing driver off the deck and it made a tremendous difference.

Peter
The old school pro I mentioned awhile back at Dick's said if there is going to be a change of direction, you have to stop so you can allow the change to occur. (Any Bertholy-ite knows this, but as Peter posted, sometimes we are due for some better remembering!)You can't just throw the car into drive if your are backing up....the pro said I was very close to doing that( not pausing) and this was causing me to have a slight over the top swing.

Like Allen I wondered how this jives with tour tempo findings etc and so I did a little youtube work...and then on the weekend watched some golf. The pause at the top is very discernible in some tour players, even to the naked eye, and on other players only discernible in slow motion sequences by evaluating individual frames. With most tour pros it is so well timed that we can't see it unless we are looking for it - but it is there.

Anyways, it is funny sometimes how things are connected in this big wide world of ours. Just this week I was working on my swing and I remembered the very same 1,2,3 advice that Bertholy gave except I focused on the statement that the downswing should start with the same pace that the takeaway does. I was hitting balls into my net, and for my manual conscious swings I was hitting shots to tour tempo beats. I decided to focus on this aspect - having my downswing start at the same pace as my turn back - but still try to arrive at impact within the time frame that the tour tempo tones allowed for.

Like Peter, I was pleasantly surprised to find this provided a much improved strike, and like Allen said I found that I had plenty of time to get back to impact after making that gentle easy start back down. During my league match Wed night, I was bombing it out there with our longest hitter, and one of my playing partners commented that it looked like I slowed my swing down.

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2010, 2:56 am #4

with most tour pro's who have an average 1 second swing from start of BS to impact with an average .75 seconds to top of BS and .25 seconds from there to impact. PT yes ... slow, not hardly.

Compare this to the am who has an average 1.5 second BS but the same .25 second DS. At this tempo the DS does indeed seem rushed. IMHO, the answer isn't to slow down the DS. When you speed up the first part of the BS, it quite remarkably seems like you suddenly have a ton of time left over for the transition. I know it seems counterintuitive, but it does work.
and we aren't.

While Bertholy advises a 3 count on the backswing for us in order to allow us to insure that we are doing the right thing, you are free to go faster if you ARE doing the right thing and that continues at the faster tempo. Given what I've seen of video of most ams they are not doing the right thing at whatever tempo they swing.

Recently I went to high performance driving school and while I've driven for a long time it was clear that it would take quite a bit of work for me to respond as quickly as our instructors who were racers but still not the racing equivalent of tour pros and this was only at 35-50 mph or so.

Peter
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

June 20th, 2010, 3:39 am #5

Interesting way to put it. Somebody who 'responds quickly' is not thinking about what they are doing. Possibly having to swing slowly is a result of a need for conscious direction to the swing. Or possibly a problem with over control...

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2010, 4:56 pm #6

In my case (and I suspect Bertholy saw this in many) moving too quickly is an invitation for 'hit impulse'. Moving slowly in the backswing sets the tone and starting the downswing slowly goes a long way to taming that impulse. In a proper swing where my lower body starts the downswing and there is then a delay before my arms start down, I feel as though my arms are 'waiting'. If I move too quickly my arms don't 'wait' - Failure of PSM if PT is violated. Berhtoly said there are only two things you might think about consciously in the swing if you have to think of something - lead knee to start the downswing and 'Rifle Barrel'. That is pretty much the limit of my conscious thoughts.

Peter
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Joined: February 10th, 2010, 12:54 am

June 20th, 2010, 9:12 pm #7

The old school pro I mentioned awhile back at Dick's said if there is going to be a change of direction, you have to stop so you can allow the change to occur. (Any Bertholy-ite knows this, but as Peter posted, sometimes we are due for some better remembering!)You can't just throw the car into drive if your are backing up....the pro said I was very close to doing that( not pausing) and this was causing me to have a slight over the top swing.

Like Allen I wondered how this jives with tour tempo findings etc and so I did a little youtube work...and then on the weekend watched some golf. The pause at the top is very discernible in some tour players, even to the naked eye, and on other players only discernible in slow motion sequences by evaluating individual frames. With most tour pros it is so well timed that we can't see it unless we are looking for it - but it is there.

Anyways, it is funny sometimes how things are connected in this big wide world of ours. Just this week I was working on my swing and I remembered the very same 1,2,3 advice that Bertholy gave except I focused on the statement that the downswing should start with the same pace that the takeaway does. I was hitting balls into my net, and for my manual conscious swings I was hitting shots to tour tempo beats. I decided to focus on this aspect - having my downswing start at the same pace as my turn back - but still try to arrive at impact within the time frame that the tour tempo tones allowed for.

Like Peter, I was pleasantly surprised to find this provided a much improved strike, and like Allen said I found that I had plenty of time to get back to impact after making that gentle easy start back down. During my league match Wed night, I was bombing it out there with our longest hitter, and one of my playing partners commented that it looked like I slowed my swing down.

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
So would it be possible to put this cadence as a clearkey? My tempo is my biggest enemy on the course....I get very quick. At times.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

June 21st, 2010, 1:52 am #8

because the cadence is tied to points in the swing, this keeps you in manual mode and thinking about your swing. For a clearkey to be genuine it must be:

1. Words
2. at a pace in keeping with your swing and temperament ( quick pace = shorter clearkey and vice versa)
3. The words must be something TOTALLY void of any reference either directly or indirectly to the swing, swing mechanics, the game, the score...anything at all about golf.

See page 21 of The Blueprint for a review.

Proper tempo is a habit that can be learned too....you practice it the way you practice anything else if you are a Blueprinter. Experiment to discover and pick your tempo that is right for you....then hit four shots on manual to your tempo, cadence timing, tour tempo tones,metronome etc. Now hit four shots on clearkey...for your pre-shot, make a practice swing to your desired tempo, then give yourself the suggestion that this is what you want, then go to automatic and play your shot.



Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: February 10th, 2010, 12:54 am

June 21st, 2010, 8:12 pm #9

Yeah, I went back and read the clearkey section a few times...I haven't been playing too many rounds lately but when I have and played on my clearkey I've struggled a bit. I think the biggest problem has been my tempo/swing speed...I can feel it and other players have pointed it out on bad shots. I'll keep at it though...that's problem with starting a new program at the start of golf season.

The counting 1,2,3 made an unbelievable difference the other day....I never tried it before, what a simple way to slow things down.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

June 22nd, 2010, 1:23 am #10

1. That you are building a swing and playing...something Bertholy and the Blueprint advise against - and which most of us don't follow.

2. When you play and utilize a clearkey correctly, you can in fact play worse. Think about it for a moment and it makes perfect sense. On clearkey, conscious thought about swing mechanics is suspended, BUT your system knows it still needs to make a swing - so it goes to the data bank and it finds a hodge podge of half swing methods, styles, and partly installed habits...it has no choice but to pick one. Usually the strongest one, sometimes "first avaialable".

The clearkey isn't a magic pill that will deliver super performance just by doing - the clearkey can only allow the releasing of whatever habits are stored...if you don't have any habits firmly in place, well...you are going to have mixed results until you have firmly established habits. This is why some players try clearkey and they play worse and they declare "it doesn't work" - actually it probably is working quite well.

There is an acclimation period for learning to play without conscious direction and it varies from player to player. This is why all exercises in The Blueprint are done 1/2 with total engagement of conscious thought and 1/2 without any conscious thought by utilizing your clearkey.

Kevin

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
Last edited by mcirishman57 on June 22nd, 2010, 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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