Peter this is a video of Jason Elsinger who is said to hit over 400 yrds

Peter this is a video of Jason Elsinger who is said to hit over 400 yrds

Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

September 26th, 2010, 7:48 pm #1

http://www.golfstrong.com/video.html

You have to type his name in the search engine- it's called
The real deal

By letting the video start to play and then clicking and holding
the mouse button behind the what you ma call it- the video
tracking ball? his swing stops at different points.

If you take a look- does he do a little squat as he starts down?
Is it to help brach himself for the movements to come?

At impact his trail elbow is still very bent, so is there absolutely no attempt to hit with his trail arm- it's his whole trail side
helping in his swing?
The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

JC
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Joined: November 17th, 2001, 6:19 am

September 28th, 2010, 4:35 pm #2

The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

No, it is the capillaries in the left shoulder and left Latissimus dorsi muscle responding to inter cranial activity which is moving the trail arm.

Now you know the secret, but be careful who you tell.

Best regards,

Ham
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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

September 28th, 2010, 7:15 pm #3

What effect does Newton's law of gravy have on the golf swing?
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

September 29th, 2010, 3:45 pm #4

The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

No, it is the capillaries in the left shoulder and left Latissimus dorsi muscle responding to inter cranial activity which is moving the trail arm.

Now you know the secret, but be careful who you tell.

Best regards,

Ham
How can i tell anyone if i can't even say it?
So what then is the secrete of gravy?

JC
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

September 29th, 2010, 4:02 pm #5

What effect does Newton's law of gravy have on the golf swing?
CD, you need to be more pacific about whose law of
gravy you mean- Wayne Newton's, or Olivia fig Newton's,
or.. every Newton uses gravy in different ways,
-just like the rest of us.

Some guy named Issac Newton said everyone's gravy
is the same- that can't be right.

JC
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 29th, 2010, 4:40 pm #6

http://www.golfstrong.com/video.html

You have to type his name in the search engine- it's called
The real deal

By letting the video start to play and then clicking and holding
the mouse button behind the what you ma call it- the video
tracking ball? his swing stops at different points.

If you take a look- does he do a little squat as he starts down?
Is it to help brach himself for the movements to come?

At impact his trail elbow is still very bent, so is there absolutely no attempt to hit with his trail arm- it's his whole trail side
helping in his swing?
The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

JC
does he do a little squat as he starts down?

His weight moves to his lead foot. It might only be called a squat because of the movement of his lead knee. His trail leg does not flex significantly at the knee. This is a pretty standard action for tour pros.

Is it to help brach himself for the movements to come?

Assuming you mean brace I would say not really. Any 'bracing' (arresting of movement) occurs after the lead knee movement and the shift of his weight.

At impact his trail elbow is still very bent, so is there absolutely no attempt to hit with his trail arm

You'd have to ask him what he 'feels' he's doing but even if he 'feels' like he's hitting hard with his trail arm (it can feel that way) that's not what he's doing.

it's his whole trail side helping in his swing?

His whole body is generating power for (helping) his swing.

The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

Assuming you mean gravity the answer is no. If it was only gravity moving a completely relaxed trail arm he would not wind up in the final position shown in this portion of the video:



Gravity assists with moving the arms down but that is not the only thing at work.

This is an excellent example of what Bertholy's drills are designed to produce in the downswing.

Peter
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

September 29th, 2010, 4:46 pm #7

CD, you need to be more pacific about whose law of
gravy you mean- Wayne Newton's, or Olivia fig Newton's,
or.. every Newton uses gravy in different ways,
-just like the rest of us.

Some guy named Issac Newton said everyone's gravy
is the same- that can't be right.

JC
Newton's law of universal gravy states that every massive particle in the universe attracts every other massive particle with a force which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. (Separately it was shown that large spherically-symmetrical masses attract and are attracted as if all their mass were concentrated at their centers.) This is a general physical law derived from empirical observations by what Newton called induction.[1] It is a part of classical mechanics and was formulated in Newton's work Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("the Principia"), first published on 5 July 1687. (When Newton's book was presented in 1686 to the Royal Society, Robert Hooke made a claim that Newton had obtained the inverse square law from him see History section below.) In modern language, the law states the following:

Every point mass attracts every single other point mass by a force pointing along the line intersecting both points. The force is directly proportional to the product of the two masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the point masses:[2]

F = G \frac{m_1 m_2}{r^2},\

where:

* F is the magnitude of the gravitational force between the two point masses,
* G is the gravy constant,
* m1 is the mass of the first point mass,
* m2 is the mass of the second point mass, and
* r is the distance between the two point masses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton%27s ... ravitation

Herbert
Last edited by gHerbert on September 29th, 2010, 8:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

September 29th, 2010, 6:55 pm #8

CD, you need to be more pacific about whose law of
gravy you mean- Wayne Newton's, or Olivia fig Newton's,
or.. every Newton uses gravy in different ways,
-just like the rest of us.

Some guy named Issac Newton said everyone's gravy
is the same- that can't be right.

JC
I'll take Juice Newton.

That guy Elsinger has really big biceps.
Do you think that helps him with gravy?
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Joined: June 12th, 2003, 5:22 pm

September 30th, 2010, 2:00 am #9

does he do a little squat as he starts down?

His weight moves to his lead foot. It might only be called a squat because of the movement of his lead knee. His trail leg does not flex significantly at the knee. This is a pretty standard action for tour pros.

Is it to help brach himself for the movements to come?

Assuming you mean brace I would say not really. Any 'bracing' (arresting of movement) occurs after the lead knee movement and the shift of his weight.

At impact his trail elbow is still very bent, so is there absolutely no attempt to hit with his trail arm

You'd have to ask him what he 'feels' he's doing but even if he 'feels' like he's hitting hard with his trail arm (it can feel that way) that's not what he's doing.

it's his whole trail side helping in his swing?

His whole body is generating power for (helping) his swing.

The trail arm is just moved by gravy?

Assuming you mean gravity the answer is no. If it was only gravity moving a completely relaxed trail arm he would not wind up in the final position shown in this portion of the video:



Gravity assists with moving the arms down but that is not the only thing at work.

This is an excellent example of what Bertholy's drills are designed to produce in the downswing.

Peter
The angle may be deceptive, but to me it appears that the club shaft bends as he loads it, caused by the inertia of the lagging clubhead.

However by the time the club is parallel to the ground in the downswing, the bend is forward; the clubhead is no longer lagging, but is leading.

you've probably talked about this recently. I've been gone awhile, hurt my shoulder and didn't hit for two years. I played 18 a couple weeks ago without pain, maybe I'm past most of it.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 30th, 2010, 10:29 pm #10

The shaft definitely bends. It also rotates. One source of the force that bends the shaft is the inertia of the club head vs the acceleration of the club at the beginning of the downswing. During the downswing the club head acceleration overtakes the shaft acceleration (at least for a good golf swing) and this source goes away. Another source of the force that bends the shaft is the distance between the center of mass of the club head vs the connection to the shaft. As a result of this source the club head will wind up leading the shaft into impact and more so with wood club head because of the larger offset. The club head also 'droops' (the shaft is bent towards the ground) at impact as a result of this source.

It's the second source that makes it valuable to spine align all of your shafts and is part of the reason matching shaft to swing and driver head is VERY important if you want to maximize distance since the the club head lead changes the loft at impact.

You may find this article by Tom Wishon interesting.

Peter
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