Optimize your game

Optimize your game

Joined: December 28th, 2009, 5:10 am

December 28th, 2009, 5:57 am #1

A new concept introduced this year to that golf industry, made a fast and furious sweep around the world in less than 10 months since it's release on the champions tour in Newport Beach, CA.

That concept was optimizing the static weight and balance point of a golf club to the individual swinging. By doing so, the golfer gained a sense of feel and awareness of the golf club like never before. To optimize a golf club to an individual you need to be able to raise the static weight and balance point. This can only be done with adjustable internal shaft weights.

These weights are placed into the shaft 4-10 inches down inside the shaft from the butt end. Access to the inside of the shaft is done on site( driving range or putting green )by the use of a grip modifier. Once a hole is made in the butt end, specific weights are inserted to raise the static weight. Adjusting the weights up or down inside the shaft ( 4-10 inches ) allows for fine tuning the balance point once the right static weight has been applied.

Optimizations take anywhere from 15-30 min. per club( on site ).

Drivers, we have seen gains of 10-15 yards in SS 80-100 MHP. Above that, in excess of 20-30 Yrds. with more control and more fairways hit.

Putters, we have seen better control, more stability, and less three putts.

In the last 6 months we have shipped out product to the UK, Asia, Netherlands, and Australia. We have over 100 tour players around the world using these weights, with multiple wins.

2010 will be the year of optimization. A new term and system for an industry in need of something that actually makes a difference in peoples golf game, and doesn't cost an arm and two legs.

Feel free to email me for more information.

Thanks
Matt King

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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

December 28th, 2009, 4:46 pm #2

I assume you are doing some sort of MOI matching?
Here is an interesting article on MOI matching:
http://www.wishongolf.com/moi.php

MOI matching has been around for a long time...

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

December 28th, 2009, 8:57 pm #3

A new concept introduced this year to that golf industry, made a fast and furious sweep around the world in less than 10 months since it's release on the champions tour in Newport Beach, CA.

That concept was optimizing the static weight and balance point of a golf club to the individual swinging. By doing so, the golfer gained a sense of feel and awareness of the golf club like never before. To optimize a golf club to an individual you need to be able to raise the static weight and balance point. This can only be done with adjustable internal shaft weights.

These weights are placed into the shaft 4-10 inches down inside the shaft from the butt end. Access to the inside of the shaft is done on site( driving range or putting green )by the use of a grip modifier. Once a hole is made in the butt end, specific weights are inserted to raise the static weight. Adjusting the weights up or down inside the shaft ( 4-10 inches ) allows for fine tuning the balance point once the right static weight has been applied.

Optimizations take anywhere from 15-30 min. per club( on site ).

Drivers, we have seen gains of 10-15 yards in SS 80-100 MHP. Above that, in excess of 20-30 Yrds. with more control and more fairways hit.

Putters, we have seen better control, more stability, and less three putts.

In the last 6 months we have shipped out product to the UK, Asia, Netherlands, and Australia. We have over 100 tour players around the world using these weights, with multiple wins.

2010 will be the year of optimization. A new term and system for an industry in need of something that actually makes a difference in peoples golf game, and doesn't cost an arm and two legs.

Feel free to email me for more information.

Thanks
Matt King
as any club maker/fitter can tell you. Old school calls it back weighting and it has been practiced for literally decades. Now, thanks to technology we are able to see the actual results in terms of trajectory, spin rate, ball speed etc, so effects are more quantifiable.

I use product from Balance Certified and all my clubs are fitted this way. Companies like this have just made the process a little more user friendly...well actually way more user friendly. I actually posted here a couple years ago about this, and used to be a retailer for their product.

Most people will see the biggest benefit in their putters being "optimized". Unless your swing is really grooved and consistent, the benefits for clubs aren't as noticeable....in other words if you hit your driver all over the club face, you may not see much of a improvement by back weighting your clubs.

***edit****

Perhaps it would be more correct to say that a hack may see the most benefit in terms of results,and the low handicap will realize more benefit in terms of feel. If the clubs are optimized properly, there will be tighter patterns and better center club face contact which will help the hack more. Like in the days of the original Big Bertha driver (before the metal technology took off) a hack would see the most benefit from the Big Bertha - it was more forgiving on off center hits. The low handicap hit everything in the sweet spot so the gain in distance for him wasn't significant - they stayed wioth the feel of a good persimmon.

***edit***
Last edited by mcirishman57 on December 28th, 2009, 11:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

December 29th, 2009, 4:04 pm #4

The component folks carry similar stuff:
http://www.golfworks.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_TL0001

So, is it better to assemble a set of clubs with the length and head weight such that a constant MOI is achieved or is it better to add more weight to the butt end of the longer clubs using more standard weights and lengths?

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

December 30th, 2009, 4:32 am #5

(In fairness to Balance Certified, it seems from reading their material they have taken it now one step further with the Adjustable Moment of Inertia Technology...more than just weight inserts that are being sold by others.)

About the fitting, in my typical hands on fashion, I just decided initially that the idea made sense, and decided to find out. I bought the dealer kit, and then headed to the range. Back then, the kit had three temporary rings, a light a medium and a heavy that you slipped over the butt end of the club. You then hit shots and the weight that produced the best results in distance and on center hits ( impact tape ) was the weight you installed. That varied lots from club to club with some needing no weight, and others needing lots. My driver, which was fitted with a SST pured shaft, showed the least amount of difference with different weights among all the clubs I tested. Also interesting was that on a couple clubs, the weight that produced the best feel, didn't produce the best results...which sorta goes against some of what Balance Certified says in their documentation. I always went with the best results for the final decision on which insert to use.

My swing improvements I am working on will probably require a new fitting for my shafts and I plan on making full use of the latest launch monitor technology to fully optimize my set. Once I get the basic set dialed in, I will then use the Balance Certified system to tweak even more...should be fun. I am pushing 130 mph swing speed ( driver ) now and can't wait to put together a driver based on the latest technology. My driver is several years old and I am wondering just how much distance ( and accuracy ) I can gain by the latest technology advances...
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

December 30th, 2009, 4:58 pm #6

You probably already know this, but when you go for your next fitting make sure that you find a fitter with one of the Doppler radar launch monitors. They very accurately measure ball flight characteristics and spin rates and will give you the best fit possible. My club maker claims that he's seen gains in driver distances of 15-20yds for good players that he has previously fitted using older launch monitors.

My plan is to do this in about a year after I am completely satisfied that my swing changes have become permanent. I got fitted for custom clubs about 3 years ago when my avg. driver speed was about 97MPH and my 5-iron was 80MPH. I can hardly wait to see the look in my club fitter's eyes when those numbers are up 20% and the launch angles are all completely different.
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

December 30th, 2009, 10:47 pm #7

One of my other customers has a friend who is a club maker and he has offered his help. He has "Ping's latest" fitting system software. Good question to ask abut the doppler, and John if you are reading this could you ask your friend? Thanks for the heads up Allen, that saved me some time I'm sure!

Would love to know what you register swing speed wise. Another "Blueprinter" who has only been doing the first exercise "Imprint" since he got the book, was messing around with his speed stik on his lunch hour. After a brief 2 minute warm up, he let one rip - 123...unbelief...again...122...3rd time 123. His previous best? 110mph.

Reports are starting to come in from folks who are "hitting their approach shots from places they've never been before...already seeing an improvement in my swing...seems like I'm getting better without doing anything different"...comments like that. It is really good to hear reports like this and to know that there are more and more people willing to commit to the exercises along with a mental approach that supercharges their efforts. What is amazing is that the approach that Bertholy adopted for the swing mechanics, and Clearkey developed for the mental side - these have existed literally for DECADES...just there for the taking.

It just seems counter intuitive to most folks who have worked on or are working on their game that they can actually make big improvements in the their swing and game just by practicing basic moves with a weighted pipe or club in their backyard, basement or garage while utilizing a sound mental approach.

Years ago it seemed few really tackled the swing with the tenacity and discipline Bertholy said is the only real requirement to possessing a fine swing. It was a bit lonely to tell the truth. But now we are seeing more and more people "jumping on the bandwagon" ( not the merry go round! ) and it is good to see and hear the positive results.
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

December 31st, 2009, 6:11 pm #8

my SpeedStik is bust but I do have a Swing Speed Radar which I haven't tried yet. I'll set it up in the garage this weekend to see if I can get some readings.

Doppler Radar launch monitors are quite expensive and most fitters will not have one. I've found that many fitters down-play that which they don't have either because they're too cheap to buy it or just plain can't afford it. Not saying that your fitter would do this, but be wary of any fitter who might poo-poo the technology. The tour uses it not only for most of their statistics gathering, but for the pro club fittings as well.

And Happy New Year!
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Joined: June 5th, 2001, 12:18 pm

January 2nd, 2010, 1:58 pm #9

I wonder if the following method would achieve similar results, ie., sameness of feel, as the commercially available ones.

Determine the "force" necessary to swing each club (grip on):
(1) F = length(in) X weight(g) / balance point(in) from butt. Calculate for irons and then woods.
(2) If matching PW to all other irons or 5W to other woods, select the "force" for those two clubs and then calculate new balance points for each club. BP = length X weight / force
(3) Mark new BP on shaft.
(4) Using corks and lead/tungsten powder, add weight to the butt end to achieve calculated balance point.
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

January 3rd, 2010, 8:05 pm #10

my SpeedStik is bust but I do have a Swing Speed Radar which I haven't tried yet. I'll set it up in the garage this weekend to see if I can get some readings.

Doppler Radar launch monitors are quite expensive and most fitters will not have one. I've found that many fitters down-play that which they don't have either because they're too cheap to buy it or just plain can't afford it. Not saying that your fitter would do this, but be wary of any fitter who might poo-poo the technology. The tour uses it not only for most of their statistics gathering, but for the pro club fittings as well.

And Happy New Year!
Set up my Swing Speed Radar this weekend only to find out that it doesn't work properly. I'll be returning it hopefully for a unit that works.

As I sat around and moped about my misfortune of having a broken SpeedStik and Swing Speed Radar, it suddenly occurred to me that I bought a Swing Fan last winter but never used it as I decided to go whole-hog with Bertholy.

I pulled it out, assembled it and started swinging it harder and harder as I looked in the mirror. I was shocked at the results. The fins of the fan generate air resistance and actually forces your entire trail upper body back into a lag position. As a result you really must drive hard with your lower body to generate speed. I can't believe the perfectly correct positions that this fan causes you to assume.

It seems as though this is a great device to aid in training Proper Sequential Motion (PSM.) I've decided to finish my daily PB training with 10 minutes of swinging this device. I'm willing to bet that this will really help increase my swing speed as well without the difficulties I had with other devices in developing an over-the-top move to achieve the speed. It not only forces lead/lag, but the resistance will strengthen your golf muscles.

You can Google "swing fan" and find a half-dozen such devices. There's even one called the Swing Kite that attaches directly to your clubs. I've read that senior long-drive champion Steve Griffith uses a 6" diameter swim noodle from WalMart on his driver to exclusively train for long-drives. The swim noodle is hollow in the center and a cross-section is shaped like a sprocket. Cut an 18" length, slit it down its length and slip it on your driver. You can make this one for a few dollars if you are really cheap.
Last edited by allenws on January 3rd, 2010, 9:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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