I can feel it.

I can feel it.

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

July 13th, 2010, 1:32 am #1

I just can't seem to do it consistently. I can feel the trail wrist and elbow and the lead wrist working correctly and when it does the ball goes a long ways farther. I can only do that about 10% of the time. The rest of the time most shots are okay but a bit short in the distance department. It is nice to get it right once in a while and it gives me hope that I can corral the proper moves after a while. Anybody else go through similar?

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

July 14th, 2010, 12:12 am #2

Will you go through the correct actions of the trail wrist, elbow,
and lead wrist?

Why can't you do it more than 10% of the time?

Isn't there a thing called mussel memory or is it just horse manure?

JC
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

July 14th, 2010, 3:38 am #3

Memories, light the corners of my mind
Misty watercolor memories of the swing I had.
Scattered pictures of the swings I left behind
swings I gave to my game.
for the way I swung.
Can it be that it was all so simple then
or has time rewritten every line?
If I had the chance to do it all again
tell me would I? Could I?
Memories, may be beautiful and yet
what's too painful to remember
we simply choose to forget
So it's the swings I will remember
whenever I remember
the way I swung.

My muscles don't remember jack and neither does my brain...

Here is a good look at the proper movements:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL_6M_xZ ... re=related

Regards, Herbert

That is painfully baaaad...
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Joined: June 28th, 2005, 6:35 am

July 14th, 2010, 7:17 am #4

I just can't seem to do it consistently. I can feel the trail wrist and elbow and the lead wrist working correctly and when it does the ball goes a long ways farther. I can only do that about 10% of the time. The rest of the time most shots are okay but a bit short in the distance department. It is nice to get it right once in a while and it gives me hope that I can corral the proper moves after a while. Anybody else go through similar?

Regards, Herbert
not technique oriented.

brains dont do technique.

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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

July 14th, 2010, 11:01 am #5

Memories, light the corners of my mind
Misty watercolor memories of the swing I had.
Scattered pictures of the swings I left behind
swings I gave to my game.
for the way I swung.
Can it be that it was all so simple then
or has time rewritten every line?
If I had the chance to do it all again
tell me would I? Could I?
Memories, may be beautiful and yet
what's too painful to remember
we simply choose to forget
So it's the swings I will remember
whenever I remember
the way I swung.

My muscles don't remember jack and neither does my brain...

Here is a good look at the proper movements:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL_6M_xZ ... re=related

Regards, Herbert

That is painfully baaaad...
:) nt
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

July 14th, 2010, 12:30 pm #6

Will you go through the correct actions of the trail wrist, elbow,
and lead wrist?

Why can't you do it more than 10% of the time?

Isn't there a thing called mussel memory or is it just horse manure?

JC
have no memory. Mussels can be cundishuned, but to remember something so that you can do it over and over without thinking about it you must repeat it many times.

If you are in a state of mind that is pre-occupied with execution, results, how to's, how not to's...all these introduce stress to our system and our natural defense system ( fight or flight ) takes over, which one of the effects is the blocking of smooth motor control - the yips.

Herbert can do it only 10% of the time for one of two reasons:

1. It isn't fully installed to the habit / unconscious level
2. It is installed, but he has not found a way to let it it out yet.

Actually it can be a combination of 1 and 2 also.

A good example of how our immune system affects our ability to execute installed habits is to take a look at any common task we perform without thinking about it - for example starting our car.

Normally we do this without a thought, we unlock, get in, put our seat belt on, insert the key into the ignition,, turn it and go.

But tonight, we are working late. Getting to the parking garage, it is empty except for one car...parked close to you...as you approach the car...a man gets out and he has a gun. You run for your, manage to get in...but your heart is racing, your fingers and hands ( perhaps your whole body )are shaking. You desperately try to find the ignition but your hands are shaking so bad you fumble and drop the keys...he is getting closer...cursing "C'MON...C'MON"...you manage to finally start the car slam it into reverse and race out of the garage just as he is approaching. You drive far from the garage before you stop...still shaking....out of breath...heart racing

The shaking hands, the racing heart, the fear, the shortness of breath...these are all reactions to stress. The same thing happens though on a smaller level, when we play golf and are thinking about anything that causes stress - what is the score, how does my swing look, I need this to win the match, what was it the pro said about hitting a slice...ANYTHING that takes us out of the present and into the future or back to the past...these all produce thoughts and emotions that our system interprets as "danger" and so it readies itself for fight or flight. The real interesting thing is that our system is non-discriminatory - positive thoughts or negative thoughts have the same effect and our system reacts the same.






Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

July 14th, 2010, 2:41 pm #7

not technique oriented.

brains dont do technique.
is to drive my Honda Civic to Sweden and play a game of golf with you today!

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

July 14th, 2010, 5:50 pm #8

Memories, light the corners of my mind
Misty watercolor memories of the swing I had.
Scattered pictures of the swings I left behind
swings I gave to my game.
for the way I swung.
Can it be that it was all so simple then
or has time rewritten every line?
If I had the chance to do it all again
tell me would I? Could I?
Memories, may be beautiful and yet
what's too painful to remember
we simply choose to forget
So it's the swings I will remember
whenever I remember
the way I swung.

My muscles don't remember jack and neither does my brain...

Here is a good look at the proper movements:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL_6M_xZ ... re=related

Regards, Herbert

That is painfully baaaad...
Wow! you express your feelings about your swing so beautifuly.

Did Mr Chazman help you compose that?

JC
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

July 17th, 2010, 9:22 am #9

have no memory. Mussels can be cundishuned, but to remember something so that you can do it over and over without thinking about it you must repeat it many times.

If you are in a state of mind that is pre-occupied with execution, results, how to's, how not to's...all these introduce stress to our system and our natural defense system ( fight or flight ) takes over, which one of the effects is the blocking of smooth motor control - the yips.

Herbert can do it only 10% of the time for one of two reasons:

1. It isn't fully installed to the habit / unconscious level
2. It is installed, but he has not found a way to let it it out yet.

Actually it can be a combination of 1 and 2 also.

A good example of how our immune system affects our ability to execute installed habits is to take a look at any common task we perform without thinking about it - for example starting our car.

Normally we do this without a thought, we unlock, get in, put our seat belt on, insert the key into the ignition,, turn it and go.

But tonight, we are working late. Getting to the parking garage, it is empty except for one car...parked close to you...as you approach the car...a man gets out and he has a gun. You run for your, manage to get in...but your heart is racing, your fingers and hands ( perhaps your whole body )are shaking. You desperately try to find the ignition but your hands are shaking so bad you fumble and drop the keys...he is getting closer...cursing "C'MON...C'MON"...you manage to finally start the car slam it into reverse and race out of the garage just as he is approaching. You drive far from the garage before you stop...still shaking....out of breath...heart racing

The shaking hands, the racing heart, the fear, the shortness of breath...these are all reactions to stress. The same thing happens though on a smaller level, when we play golf and are thinking about anything that causes stress - what is the score, how does my swing look, I need this to win the match, what was it the pro said about hitting a slice...ANYTHING that takes us out of the present and into the future or back to the past...these all produce thoughts and emotions that our system interprets as "danger" and so it readies itself for fight or flight. The real interesting thing is that our system is non-discriminatory - positive thoughts or negative thoughts have the same effect and our system reacts the same.






Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
You run to your car get in and start it much faster then normal and get the heck out of there much faster then normal. That is because you are a person who functions better under stress then you do under normal conditions.

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

July 17th, 2010, 3:18 pm #10

like you do and missing the point...the running to the car is the flight for survival.

The shaking hands, the racing heart, the nervousness are all physilogical reactions triggered by our fight or flight mechanism...THE HABIT of smoothly and efforetlessly starting our car was what was affected adversely ....the same way our "normal range swing" is adversely affected by the pressure of playing "real golf" on a course under match conditons.

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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