homemade super flexible golf clubs

homemade super flexible golf clubs

Joined: March 23rd, 2003, 1:34 pm

February 21st, 2009, 2:34 pm #1

I visit the forum every once in a while. Not playing because of some back issues. Okay if you want a recipe for homemade superflexible clubs here goes.

One: This gets you about the same flex as a store bought training aid and works for woods, irons, and is REALLY good for putters.

material. Clubhead of choice. Ball point pen spring or suitable small diameter wire. Half inch wood dowel. Fiberglass driveway reflector pole. Golf grip and tape. Epoxy.

procedure. Cut the dowel to about twelve inches and drill a 5/16" or 1/4" hole about four or more inches deep in the center of the dowel. This serves as the club's handle. Next make sure the clubhead's hosel diameter hole is clean. Wire brush is all that's needed. Take your fiberglass rod and sand the tip to remove any plastic or paint and wrap wire around the tip so that you get a somewhat snug fit ( all the way ) when you insert the now wrapped fiberglass rod into the clubhead hosel. Next mix your epoxy and also mix into the epoxy shafting beads into the epoxy to get a better and tighter fit before gluing the shaft and head together. ( sugar will due if you don't have beads). ( a two component high strength epoxy from Lowes also can replace the clubmaker glue) Let dry. Next determine the length of the club, cut the grip end of the club to fit into the drilled section of the dowel, epoxy, and let dry. Finally just grip the dowel as you would a normal shafted club. When using this do take it slow until you get the hang of the club. Cost will be less than $15 if you get an old clubhead and pull the shaft. Postscript. When using expoy make sure you put some in the hosel , on the shaft, and around the wire. Don't worry about appearance you're after reliability.

Two: The real softie.

Materials. Clubhead, Use only an iron. 3/8" diameter tap. 3/8 inch Delrin Acetal rod from a local plastic company. ( buy about six feet. Flexible plastic hose found at Lowes with a 3/8" ID. Half dozen small brad nails. Gripping materials.

procedure. Ream out the clubhead hosel with the 3/8" tap. Next screw the Acetal rod all the way into the hosel. Do this by placing the rod in your bench vice and turning the clubhead. Cut the rod to the desired length. Heat a twelve inch piece of hose in the microwave until it's soft, wet the grip end of the shaft or use a VERY light coat of light oil and then slip the hose over the rod. ( sounds obscene huh?) Next use your brad nails to secure the hose to the rod and make sure to not leave the heads sticking out of the hose or there's no way to grip the club. When done clean the hose of all residue, let dry, and grip as a standard shafted club.

comments. This is a super soft shafted club and will really get you to feel the proper way to transition into the downswing. I would not recommend using this club on a crowded driving range. Give yourself some space for safety sake.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 22nd, 2006, 11:35 am

February 22nd, 2009, 8:29 pm #2

There was a golf pro at our resort about 15 years ago, and he had an, EXTREMELY, noodely shaft that was built by one of the tire companies out of rubber. It was so loosey-goosey it was almost like a hose.

I am not exaggerating when I tell you that he could have sold that driver 200 times a year.

I watched beginner women worm-burn drives 50 or 60 yards, and take that driver and belt perfect 125 to 175 yard drives dead straight....and do it time after time, until they got exhausted.

The first time I saw this I thought the woman had to be a set-up, and the pro was playing a joke on the range rats.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 23rd, 2009, 1:23 am #3

but I seriously doubt a beginner or someone that worm burns drives/can't hit a regular club well, can hit the whippy or these homebrews very well at all.

The pro at the range I practice at could barely hit mine...he laughed as he gave it back to me and said "I doubt that will help your swing much". Odd
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 11th, 2004, 2:15 am

February 23rd, 2009, 10:31 am #4


Men are more handsy so more likely to start a transition with the hands even if they are capable of correcting for it. While women are more hippsy and would likely find it easier to start the transition with their hips and likely have a increased natural chance of hitting the whippy club.

or maybe it's just late and I'm tired and shouldn't be posting. Goodnight.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 23rd, 2009, 1:18 pm #5

in forums drunk a couple of years ago, after on particularly embarrassing rant on a poker forum! Not that you were drunk but your claim of being tired reminded me of it.

Back to the whippy, I had one more flexible rod so I am going to try one more time with a home brew. put it together last night using a head from my old Cleveland 53 degree "Diadic" gap wedge. I figure since I will mostly be practicing shots under 70 yards, the swing force may not be enough to lose the head....at any rate I'll use it til it comes off and then order a real one!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

February 23rd, 2009, 3:09 pm #6

Men are more handsy so more likely to start a transition with the hands even if they are capable of correcting for it. While women are more hippsy and would likely find it easier to start the transition with their hips and likely have a increased natural chance of hitting the whippy club.

or maybe it's just late and I'm tired and shouldn't be posting. Goodnight.
I think that you're on to something here. Women have much weaker upper bodies than men, but their lower bodies are much closer ... and perhaps their hips are actually stronger than a man's.

One of the problems I see with female amateur golfers is that their swing speed is low and they have trouble getting the ball in the air. With a slow swing speed, a very flexible shaft would probably allow them to get a much higher launch angle. After all, that's what different shaft flexes really accomplish ... differences in launch angles.

I can believe that a woman would have more success with a Whippy club than a man. A newbie female hitting 175 yards though does seem a bit of a stretch.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 23rd, 2003, 1:34 pm

February 24th, 2009, 12:11 am #7

There was a golf pro at our resort about 15 years ago, and he had an, EXTREMELY, noodely shaft that was built by one of the tire companies out of rubber. It was so loosey-goosey it was almost like a hose.

I am not exaggerating when I tell you that he could have sold that driver 200 times a year.

I watched beginner women worm-burn drives 50 or 60 yards, and take that driver and belt perfect 125 to 175 yard drives dead straight....and do it time after time, until they got exhausted.

The first time I saw this I thought the woman had to be a set-up, and the pro was playing a joke on the range rats.
I know what you're talking about. When the PGA came to Latrobe, Pa. my dad took me to a practice round. I saw Hogan, Snead, Nicklaus ( very young ), and the winner Dave Marr. We stayed for a clinic and Paul Hahn put on a trick show. Besides his six foot long shafted driver that he hit further than Nicklaus he also had a golf club with a rubber hose shaft. This guy kept us amused and sometimes just plain laughing out loud for about an hour.

By the way my super softie shafted pratice club is about one step above the rubber hose, it's so flexible that you see a definite bow when addressing the ball.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 24th, 2009, 1:01 am #8

in forums drunk a couple of years ago, after on particularly embarrassing rant on a poker forum! Not that you were drunk but your claim of being tired reminded me of it.

Back to the whippy, I had one more flexible rod so I am going to try one more time with a home brew. put it together last night using a head from my old Cleveland 53 degree "Diadic" gap wedge. I figure since I will mostly be practicing shots under 70 yards, the swing force may not be enough to lose the head....at any rate I'll use it til it comes off and then order a real one!
The real Tempomaster is MUCH more flexible than the driveway markers from Home Depot.

Peter
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

February 24th, 2009, 3:25 am #9

Probably good thing I didn't order then! I'm just now consistent with these! Now that I am using a short putter again I am seriously considering buying the whippy putter. What do ya think, anybody have any reports on that?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

February 24th, 2009, 5:24 pm #10

The real Tempomaster is MUCH more flexible than the driveway markers from Home Depot.

Peter
at the range could hardly hit his whippy and it would
not help his swing?

Is that pro perhaps too handsy?
I know whippy is a practice club,but what if a player
whatever his level of skill can't hit whippy?

Does that mean the player has swing issues?

JC

Quote
Like
Share