Hit the ball close and score well. Miss greens score bad.

Hit the ball close and score well. Miss greens score bad.

gsw
Joined: July 27th, 2000, 11:22 pm

May 13th, 2011, 4:28 am #1

I have been working hard on my short game lately in hopes of improving my scores and it has been working. However there is no substitute for good ball striking. This evening I played nine holes after working on my putting and chipping and hitting two bags of balls on the driving range. I hit eight greens made three birdies and one bogey for a two under 34. The only bogey came when I flew a green because I hit the ball too good, hit a bad chip and two putted. So much for the short game, I play well when I hit the ball close. Unfortunately that does not happen very often.



Stan
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

May 13th, 2011, 3:50 pm #2

pros averaage about 60 to 70 percent to GIR. So to even get a sniff at making the cut....they have to get up and down....and if they hit los of greens....they better be rolling the ball well or its the same thing.

Reg joes may never have pro quality striking...so short game is even more important....it doesn't take tour level comittment to get prety good at short game tecnique....



Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

May 13th, 2011, 4:50 pm #3

I have found that when playing with a low handicap golfer the ability to get it up and down is noticeable compared to higher handicapers. Touring pros as you mention are at another level entirely for the most part.

I have found on the other hand that the closer to the hole I am for the short game shot the more likely that I will get up and down. A pro hitting 70% of the greens in going to be closer to the hole on the short game shots then I am hitting 20% of the greens. Hmmm a good example might be missing left on a green with the pin cut left and a big old bunker between me and the green with the green sloping away. LOL not an easy shot! The pro is probably going to miss on the other side of the green but if the pro misses on the short side the ball is more likely in the bunker which is an easier shot most of the time. Where you miss is often very important which leads us to course management. It is all a big circle in a way. At any rate you are dead on with your assessment.

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 13th, 2011, 5:55 pm #4

The big obstacle that stands in the way of improved short game around here is the lack of short game practice facilities. While it's easy to set up a little range to practice landing a ball on a spot, you need a real green to show what the ball will do after it lands. I've been at clubs in other places (like south Florida) where there were excellent short game practice facilities. If you have it, take advantage.

Peter
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

May 13th, 2011, 6:18 pm #5

http://www.softrakgreens.com/
Home depot sells putting green material now days also. Might be a good project for the summer?

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

May 13th, 2011, 8:13 pm #6

The big obstacle that stands in the way of improved short game around here is the lack of short game practice facilities. While it's easy to set up a little range to practice landing a ball on a spot, you need a real green to show what the ball will do after it lands. I've been at clubs in other places (like south Florida) where there were excellent short game practice facilities. If you have it, take advantage.

Peter
for most of us who have "day jobs" would best be spent practicing something we can really get good at..given the time we have available. We can all drastically improve our putting, and don't even need to go to the course to get real good at developing a repeating stroke.

The other thing is to pick one one short game shot that is your "go to" shot and learn it well. This shot should be based on the type of short game shot you encounter most often, including it's length and type of shot. Get real good at this shot and you can build your game and round around this shot. You should also practice the type of shot you encounter the most on short par 4's and the par 5's so you can hit it close to the hole and take advantage of those birdie opps.

Learn to hit one type of short game shot really well, and learn to repeat your most often encountered distance for short par 4's and the par 5's. Even if you don't have a lot of time to practice, you can practice in a way that will translate to lower scores on the course.

I'm still averaging WAY above 2 puts per GIR so you know where my time is being spent!

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 13th, 2011, 10:06 pm #7

http://www.softrakgreens.com/
Home depot sells putting green material now days also. Might be a good project for the summer?

Regards, Herbert
I looked into this a while back. The key for the kind of practice I'm talking about is an artificial green that will receive a pitch shot like a real green. It turns out that base for this type of green is more complex making for a much more expensive package. I don't have a large enough yard to make it worth it since I'd get at most about 5 yard shots.

I have a 9' modular putting green that I keep in the basement that has been very helpful.

Peter
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Joined: June 28th, 2005, 6:35 am

May 13th, 2011, 10:18 pm #8

for most of us who have "day jobs" would best be spent practicing something we can really get good at..given the time we have available. We can all drastically improve our putting, and don't even need to go to the course to get real good at developing a repeating stroke.

The other thing is to pick one one short game shot that is your "go to" shot and learn it well. This shot should be based on the type of short game shot you encounter most often, including it's length and type of shot. Get real good at this shot and you can build your game and round around this shot. You should also practice the type of shot you encounter the most on short par 4's and the par 5's so you can hit it close to the hole and take advantage of those birdie opps.

Learn to hit one type of short game shot really well, and learn to repeat your most often encountered distance for short par 4's and the par 5's. Even if you don't have a lot of time to practice, you can practice in a way that will translate to lower scores on the course.

I'm still averaging WAY above 2 puts per GIR so you know where my time is being spent!

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
short game should be the same as a tour pro as it is all technique and easy on body.
today the course open up here, still early, bad greens, long grass and like putting on a rock and high grass not fun but anyway.
9 holes hit 5gir, shot +3. (one 3 putt due to pw went 15 meters longer than expected)
basically all missed shot was to much clean hits, so the ball fly way longer and then it dosnt help when greens are so slow and bumpy.

I basically work the game simple, have a few shots that you always can do, find a way to always do them, if not as close by as possible.
save strokes at the end of day.
been working the swing, and finnaly it seems to come togheter.
best 9 holes ever in ballstriking.

I find a lot of people never spend time to ingrain one swing, been there myself, but as I do it now, I am able to swing and hit shots I never been able to before. had 185yards left, pulled out a 5i hybrid and took off a few in the swing, 10f putt but burned the birdie chans.
to do that, was impossible last year or before.
a lesson with a pro, best thing I did, the simple putting system and then the Mike Austin motion, have made wonders for my game.
and still got a lot of work to do.

my approach is, putting and short game, you should be able to match a pro.
most however never spend time making clean hits.
a buddy of mine still cant chip for his life in spite of 20 years of golf.
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

May 15th, 2011, 11:44 pm #9

I have been working hard on my short game lately in hopes of improving my scores and it has been working. However there is no substitute for good ball striking. This evening I played nine holes after working on my putting and chipping and hitting two bags of balls on the driving range. I hit eight greens made three birdies and one bogey for a two under 34. The only bogey came when I flew a green because I hit the ball too good, hit a bad chip and two putted. So much for the short game, I play well when I hit the ball close. Unfortunately that does not happen very often.



Stan
Stan, there is a saying that we believe what we have to believe, when we have to believe it. My game is like yours, so I tend to believe that ballstriking is the key. But I play with a guy who is not as good a ballstriker as me, no slouch though. But his short game is much better. He usually beats me. I usually shoot low 80s and he is usually upper 70s.

I got the Phil Mickelson short game DVDs for Christmas and am enthused about working on some of his ideas. Over the past few years I've worked on long game but not short game to speak of. It's time.
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

May 16th, 2011, 12:45 pm #10

I have been working hard on my short game lately in hopes of improving my scores and it has been working. However there is no substitute for good ball striking. This evening I played nine holes after working on my putting and chipping and hitting two bags of balls on the driving range. I hit eight greens made three birdies and one bogey for a two under 34. The only bogey came when I flew a green because I hit the ball too good, hit a bad chip and two putted. So much for the short game, I play well when I hit the ball close. Unfortunately that does not happen very often.



Stan
"Hit the ball close and score well. Miss greens score bad."

Not so. Dave Pelz studied Tigers game a few years ago when he was still "The Great One" and discovered that he wasn't in the top ten in GIR, putting, iron shots, driving distance or accuracy, etc. So why was Tiger winning 25% of the tournaments he entered at that time? Pelz correlated it to one statistic ... scrambling. It seems that Tiger was number one in getting the ball up-and-down from off of the green.

And lets not forget about the work done by Columbia University mathematics professor, Mark Broadie, which shows that the long game is probably more important for AM's than the short game.
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