Hit it 370?

Hit it 370?

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

March 9th, 2010, 5:12 am #1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhlHpyI4d2c

How flexible are you?

Herbert
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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

March 9th, 2010, 12:19 pm #2

It sure don't look effortless.
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

March 9th, 2010, 2:59 pm #3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhlHpyI4d2c

How flexible are you?

Herbert
that flexibility and "sequence" are important factors in hitting the ball far and with good accuracy. However, I don't buy Prichard's spine angle position argument as the panacea for accuracy. I find it odd that Prichard holds up Palmer in this example as he was not exactly known for his accuracy.

Another interesting thing can be seen from Palmer's swing positions:



Note, that halfway through the DS, Palmer has lost considerable angle retention. But also note that Palmer arrives at impact with hands well ahead of the ball and with a post impact position with some trail hand bend. This is why he could hit it 340 with balata and persimmon.
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Joined: January 28th, 2003, 12:59 pm

March 9th, 2010, 4:02 pm #4

He was considered one of the straightest driver in his prime.
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

March 9th, 2010, 5:51 pm #5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhlHpyI4d2c

How flexible are you?

Herbert
Only $90.00 per hour for Rolfing!

http://originalrolfmethod.com/golf_rolf.html

Herbert
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

March 9th, 2010, 5:57 pm #6

irritating aspects of the SOMAX analysis's is that they seem to be thinly veiled infomercials for micro fiber reduction. Not that it is necessarily a bad technique, but few can afford the expense and time to have it done.
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

March 9th, 2010, 6:05 pm #7

He was considered one of the straightest driver in his prime.
that the tour compiled driving accuracy statistics in the 50's and 60's so we can't say for sure, but my memory of the "scrambling, come-from-behind" Arnie is one of wild drives and miraculous rescue shots. He wasn't cold and calculating like Nicklaus. Instead he "went" for everything. He was the Phil Michelson of his day ... or more accurately, Phil is the Arnold Palmer of this day.
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Joined: January 23rd, 2005, 12:18 pm

March 9th, 2010, 6:09 pm #8

that flexibility and "sequence" are important factors in hitting the ball far and with good accuracy. However, I don't buy Prichard's spine angle position argument as the panacea for accuracy. I find it odd that Prichard holds up Palmer in this example as he was not exactly known for his accuracy.

Another interesting thing can be seen from Palmer's swing positions:



Note, that halfway through the DS, Palmer has lost considerable angle retention. But also note that Palmer arrives at impact with hands well ahead of the ball and with a post impact position with some trail hand bend. This is why he could hit it 340 with balata and persimmon.
I've posted here before about my very positive experiences with Bob Prichard's microfiber reduction technique. I've also posted that I think that when it comes to how to move one's body better Bob is a veritable genius and an artist as well as a shaman of sorts. But I've also posted that in my opinion Bob's view of the golf swing is fundamentally incorrect.

Tom
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Joined: January 23rd, 2005, 12:18 pm

March 9th, 2010, 6:16 pm #9

that the tour compiled driving accuracy statistics in the 50's and 60's so we can't say for sure, but my memory of the "scrambling, come-from-behind" Arnie is one of wild drives and miraculous rescue shots. He wasn't cold and calculating like Nicklaus. Instead he "went" for everything. He was the Phil Michelson of his day ... or more accurately, Phil is the Arnold Palmer of this day.
Palmer was an incredible driver of the ball. I think his reputation as a swashbuckler had more to do with his decision not to "take his medicine" when he did hit a bad shot. Rather than punch back to safety as was the preferred option for most players, Palmer would "go for broke" in defiance of the odds. As many here can attest it was always exciting to watch him play.

Tom
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

March 17th, 2010, 4:46 pm #10

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhlHpyI4d2c

How flexible are you?

Herbert
Sequence analysis. This meshes with Bertholy's training although I disagree with Prichard's comment that Palmer is the only golf pro to master the correct sequence. Virtually all of them exhibit this ability.
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