Here is the problem:

Here is the problem:

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

January 10th, 2009, 3:31 pm #1

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

January 10th, 2009, 5:17 pm #2

you ?

IS that Moe? I thought he kept his right heel down
unitil after impact.
The player on the right appeares to have more forward flex
in his right knee.
Also his right arm seems to be straighter and farther advanced
even though he has farther to go till impact- all you need to do
is straighten your right arm more and sooner and you will have
the impact position of the guy on the right.

The player on the right gives the impression to me anyway that
his upper body is more advanced even though he has farther to go
untill impact.

You also appear to be playing the ball too far forward almost
in front of your left foot. The guy on the right has a ball
position back by his left heel, maybe even a little inside
of that


The most important thing is that the photo on the right is
in black and white, and that makes all the difference in
the world.

JC
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 22nd, 2006, 11:35 am

January 10th, 2009, 6:07 pm #3

There are degrees of going around that you can accommodate in Moe's swing, but, Herbert, if you just learn the basic swing, which is more of a shoveling effort (not so much going around), you will stop losing the angle. Your problem (angle) goes back farther into the address. It is a lot easier to learn with a six iron, than a driver, but once you learn it, the motion does transfer to driver.

What I struggled with, for the longest time, was to watch old Moe, in which he look flat-footed, like stood there flat footed, like facing straight foward, and Rodney roundhoused the swing...so you will add more roundhouse if you stand flat footed and swing.

You will, also, add more roundhouse if you let the heel come up more (you don't even have to allow it to come up...read paragraph above) instead of going to the instep of the right foot on the downswing...in learning, I would exaggerate this motion a bit.

Herbert, we preach at you and preach at you, but until you do it and quit screwing around with that IMA stuff, trying to blend with Moe ideas you won't get it.

The two things that will stop losing the angle is to address the ball with that straight line from andle to shoulder, and, secondly, to have the clubhead, at address above the line of flight, and square to the target line. Until you figure this out, you won't get it right. It just goes on auto after that, and you don't even have to think about going to the inside of the right foot on the downswing that much.

It's kind of a combination of things that keeps you into that shoveling position, and then it is impossible to lose the angle. Further, you can increase the angle of attack at will...like fake increase it....consciously increase it.

Video your first swing and the angles will be just right....guaranteed.





Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 10th, 2009, 8:19 pm #4

Have to get your hands further forward before impact which means they need to be further forward before the angle starts to open which means they need to be further forward while your trail arm is bent at the elbow.

Peter
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

January 10th, 2009, 9:45 pm #5

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

January 10th, 2009, 10:08 pm #6

position looks beter....and I really like the looks of the shorts and shirt sleeves....Im under 8" of snow and doing freakin drills indoors! Lucky dawg u!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 10th, 2009, 10:17 pm #7

it does not look as though you'll stay in a 'y' position with a ball position further forward. Your trail elbow needs to get further forward while your trail arm is bent at the elbow. It looks as though it is getting 'stuck' behind your trail hip.

This could be due to something a simple as posture - if you are not bent sufficiently over the ball or your pelvis is rotated under you may not have the space for your elbow to get far enough forward.

It could also be that your motion just brings your trail elbow into your trail side vs in front of it. With this motion your hips need to either move close to the target or to rotate more to get your hands closer to the target. You can see here what Kuehne does to get his hands forward:




Peter
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

January 10th, 2009, 10:18 pm #8

This is Moe right? I couldn't help but notice the trail foot, especially after viewing the video of Todd's swing - ouch! That flat foot at impact of Todd's looks very awkward and hard on the body - didn't Ham comment that he believed that trying to keep the trail foot flat was the cause of some injury to him? When I see swings with this flat feet at impact now they all look awkward and a bit contrived to me - though if practiced enough this too will be habit.

Those flat feet of Todd's through impact was the first thing that stood out to me, makes the swing look goofy, but as they say..."pretty is as pretty does".

But I digress, that is a nice improvement from the previous!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 22nd, 2006, 11:35 am

January 10th, 2009, 11:57 pm #9

You still haven't addressed the ball with a straight line from the ankle to the shoulder on the leading side. Once you do that you will put the head in the right position for the hit, and you will stop having these types of issues.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

January 11th, 2009, 1:52 am #10

This is Moe right? I couldn't help but notice the trail foot, especially after viewing the video of Todd's swing - ouch! That flat foot at impact of Todd's looks very awkward and hard on the body - didn't Ham comment that he believed that trying to keep the trail foot flat was the cause of some injury to him? When I see swings with this flat feet at impact now they all look awkward and a bit contrived to me - though if practiced enough this too will be habit.

Those flat feet of Todd's through impact was the first thing that stood out to me, makes the swing look goofy, but as they say..."pretty is as pretty does".

But I digress, that is a nice improvement from the previous!
I don't give my trail foot any thought at all. I guess that it is flat because that is how I have it when I do the drills. It does come up a bit on a driver swing (this is a 7 iron). It does not cause any pain so I guess that I will continue to not worry about it.

Regards, Herbert
Quote
Like
Share