Golf fitness

Golf fitness

Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 8th, 2011, 7:10 pm #1

I have made an appointment to see a Titleist Performance Institute-certified trainer in my area. He will evaluate me and come up with a plan to improve my fitness.

I video'd my swing the other day and it's the same problem that was seen here 2 years ago when I posted a video. My shoulders only turn back about 45 degrees. My swing looks like I'm hitting a partial wedge but with maximum effort. No wonder I can't get my downswing into the right place. I've been unknowingly fighting this for the past few years, beginning after I got my SA swing pretty much learned. Before that I was busy enough fixing more obvious errors that I didn't know something else was fundamentally wrong. When I think of how much effort and aggravation I've spent chasing my tail...

I thought I had improved my turn but I had not. I'm looking forward to this, and I'll post some follow up on it.

On the bright side, I played in my league last night and shot a 3-over 38 which included three birdies, two doubles and two 3-putt bogies! After seeing how poor my swing was on video, I made up my mind to just take an extra club, or more likely two, and hit a true partial or easy shot into the greens, rather than my normal angry slash. I also figured I had better switch to a premium ball since I was going to be hitting lower shots and could use any additional spin. I used a BS 330-RXS and it really did stop. My playing partners were running off the greens while I was staying near my landing spots. My first approach shot for example was something like 93 yards, and I hit a 9 iron two feet from the hole. Next hole a 7 iron from 115. (Both into the wind.) Etc. I had a nice closest to the pin from 168 (hybrid) but don't know if it held up. The doubles were just poor decisions compounded by bad bounces. In the woulda coulda shoulda department, par was well within reach.

I think there are a couple of morals to that story for me. If you plan to hit greens, use a premium ball, and use more club with less effort.

Last edited by Snowman9000 on September 8th, 2011, 7:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 8th, 2011, 7:17 pm #2

and partial swings can be a big help for consistency. Most tour pros say that they don't often swing all out so most of what you see are 'partial' swings.

The geometry changes with a partial back swing are something else. If you swing like Kuchar you will be in the correct position relative to plane with any length of back swing.

Peter
Last edited by sagf_moderator on September 8th, 2011, 7:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 8th, 2011, 9:20 pm #3

I've seen video of very old Moe hitting irons, and his shoulders moved back about as far as mine, and his arms and wrist set did too. I'm betting he struck the ball a lot better though!


I'll have to look at Kuchar to see what you mean.

EDIT: I looked. That looks extremely close to Stack & Tilt. Maybe closer than some of the Bennett & Plummer pro students.
Last edited by Snowman9000 on September 8th, 2011, 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 8th, 2011, 10:13 pm #4

Forget stack & tilt; focus on his trail elbow. In common with the old Moe, Kuchar's top of swing has the club on the downswing plane. This means that there is no 'drop' of the club required to get on the downswing plane else producing an over the top swing.

Peter
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 9th, 2011, 12:45 pm #5

Well the S&T aspect is interesting because as you might recall, I gave it a tryout last year. And the results were excellent. Divots that started farther after the ball than I've ever done. And they were at the target too.
But my back could not handle it.

I will give your elbow suggestion a try. Thanks.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 9th, 2011, 2:16 pm #6

What S&T does to effect divot position is to pre-set a more forward swing center which is a compensation for those that would not otherwise get their weight onto their lead foot. To the extent that is helpful to you a similar result can be achieved by putting a golf ball under the trail side of your trail foot when practicing and rolling it in slightly to raise the trail side when you play.

When you keep your trail elbow down as Kuchar does the club will stay below shoulder height (when viewed parallel to the target line).

Peter
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 9th, 2011, 5:10 pm #7

I see what you are describing.
.
Last edited by Snowman9000 on September 9th, 2011, 5:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 9th, 2011, 7:07 pm #8

For Bertholy the 'Master Move' is the most critical move in the golf swing. This is the move from 'top of swing' to about the position you see in the picture of Kuchar. This move puts the club on/under plane. By having this position as 'top of swing' the need for that drop is eliminated.

You can also see that this top of swing is very similar to what I describe in my 4.5 drill which was developed from this clip:




Peter
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

September 9th, 2011, 7:09 pm #9

Hogan's trail hand appears to be bent back a lot. I believe that is a major factor in developing clubhead speed. Have you ever seen a pro who had the trail flat at that point in the downswing?

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

September 9th, 2011, 8:05 pm #10

http://www.network54.com/Forum/72052/me ... 00/No+need...

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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