Easier way to chip?

Easier way to chip?

Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

April 30th, 2010, 10:35 pm #1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhJ6ZB8koIo

I read a discussion in which some rules officials agree it is legal. It certainly is different. BTW in one comments section the author says he is using a lob wedge.
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Joined: October 31st, 2008, 2:49 am

May 3rd, 2010, 5:44 am #2

Another talented but quirky Canadian, from Abbotsford, BC
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gsw
Joined: July 27th, 2000, 11:22 pm

May 5th, 2010, 3:54 pm #3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhJ6ZB8koIo

I read a discussion in which some rules officials agree it is legal. It certainly is different. BTW in one comments section the author says he is using a lob wedge.
He is using a split handed grip. I love it but I could not chip that way.


Stan
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Joined: April 30th, 2001, 4:02 pm

May 6th, 2010, 5:19 pm #4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhJ6ZB8koIo

I read a discussion in which some rules officials agree it is legal. It certainly is different. BTW in one comments section the author says he is using a lob wedge.
While this might work well in hockey on ice, it seems like dragging the club along the grass would cause it to get caught up easily, even in tight lies (especially in coarse grass like Bermuda.) This would lead to very inconsistent chips. There was a trend circulating a short while ago using a lead-hand-low chipping stroke which helps prevent the early release. IMHO, early release is the most common cause of chipping errors that I've seen am's make.

On Phil Mickelson's new short game DVD he employs a bowed lead wrist with ulnar deviation for most of his chipping/pitching strokes. This really locks in the lead wrist and will completely eliminate the early release. This position can be pre-set for chips and is very easy to repeat for most am's. With just a little practice, anybody can utilize this motion with great results.
Last edited by allenws on May 6th, 2010, 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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