Chipping

Chipping

Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

May 16th, 2011, 10:25 pm #1

I have to say that chipping is the most frustrating part of the game for me. I don't scoop or flip at the ball, but I find it hard to make consistent contact from shot to shot. I think I'm moving my head.

The other (bigger?) issue is that the clubs are fairly light, compared to say, a putter, and I find it hard to "feel" the right amount of swing and force to apply. Of course when I practice, I get better results. But it seems like it would take a heckuva lot of frequent practice time to stay sharp in chipping. The feel is just so delicate, to me. I always say I'm not an athlete. The fact that I do fairly well at golf is a minor miracle.

Your thoughts on chipping?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 17th, 2011, 5:46 am #2

Practicing the IMA 'Impact Backwards' drills for so long helped tremendously. From that exercise a key that's easy to adopt is to keep the majority of your weight on your lead foot. This keeps you more stable ala putting but puts your body in a good impact position.

Because I practiced it so often I'm comfortable using my IMA '2.5' drill for chips and putts. This is very similar to the technique Bobby Jones showed for chips in one of his short films.

When close to my landing spot (10 yards or so max) I'll sometimes use a technique that Trevino demonstrated on the golf channel - Basically you set the club in your grip so that a rocking of your shoulders will bring the club into impact with the ball while the club is leaning forward. You also set ball position so that the bottom of the club head path will be after the ball. You then keep that 'unit' solid and chip with a rocking of your shoulders much like a putt. The Trevino technique is very easy to learn quickly and VERY consistent.

Either of these will give you good contact but getting the ball close depends on:

o Scoping out the green and reading the path the ball will take from a landing point

o Targeting that landing point and getting the ball to hit it

o Knowing how far the ball will roll out for the flight distance given the club you use

While I understand the advantages of always chipping with the same club I don't because I've bought into the 'land the ball as soon as possible' argument and with that you need to use the club that will give you the run you need for that landing point.

Peter
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Joined: June 28th, 2005, 6:35 am

May 17th, 2011, 7:20 am #3

I have to say that chipping is the most frustrating part of the game for me. I don't scoop or flip at the ball, but I find it hard to make consistent contact from shot to shot. I think I'm moving my head.

The other (bigger?) issue is that the clubs are fairly light, compared to say, a putter, and I find it hard to "feel" the right amount of swing and force to apply. Of course when I practice, I get better results. But it seems like it would take a heckuva lot of frequent practice time to stay sharp in chipping. The feel is just so delicate, to me. I always say I'm not an athlete. The fact that I do fairly well at golf is a minor miracle.

Your thoughts on chipping?
ur hands so loose your almost drop the shaft and let the clubhead move to the ball.
get a clean hit every time doing that.
and straight.
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

May 17th, 2011, 5:54 pm #4

I have to say that chipping is the most frustrating part of the game for me. I don't scoop or flip at the ball, but I find it hard to make consistent contact from shot to shot. I think I'm moving my head.

The other (bigger?) issue is that the clubs are fairly light, compared to say, a putter, and I find it hard to "feel" the right amount of swing and force to apply. Of course when I practice, I get better results. But it seems like it would take a heckuva lot of frequent practice time to stay sharp in chipping. The feel is just so delicate, to me. I always say I'm not an athlete. The fact that I do fairly well at golf is a minor miracle.

Your thoughts on chipping?
For me it is the opposite of what Rob said. Keep the grip firm on short shots! I am most consistent using a shoulder or body controlled swing. Distance control seems to be much better that way. If I can make a rhythmic stroke back and through I can make a reasonable shot and maybe even sink one once in a while!

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

May 17th, 2011, 6:40 pm #5

I have to say that chipping is the most frustrating part of the game for me. I don't scoop or flip at the ball, but I find it hard to make consistent contact from shot to shot. I think I'm moving my head.

The other (bigger?) issue is that the clubs are fairly light, compared to say, a putter, and I find it hard to "feel" the right amount of swing and force to apply. Of course when I practice, I get better results. But it seems like it would take a heckuva lot of frequent practice time to stay sharp in chipping. The feel is just so delicate, to me. I always say I'm not an athlete. The fact that I do fairly well at golf is a minor miracle.

Your thoughts on chipping?
http://www.youtube.com/user/martinez196 ... giuePkG_AU
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

May 17th, 2011, 9:45 pm #6

Practicing the IMA 'Impact Backwards' drills for so long helped tremendously. From that exercise a key that's easy to adopt is to keep the majority of your weight on your lead foot. This keeps you more stable ala putting but puts your body in a good impact position.

Because I practiced it so often I'm comfortable using my IMA '2.5' drill for chips and putts. This is very similar to the technique Bobby Jones showed for chips in one of his short films.

When close to my landing spot (10 yards or so max) I'll sometimes use a technique that Trevino demonstrated on the golf channel - Basically you set the club in your grip so that a rocking of your shoulders will bring the club into impact with the ball while the club is leaning forward. You also set ball position so that the bottom of the club head path will be after the ball. You then keep that 'unit' solid and chip with a rocking of your shoulders much like a putt. The Trevino technique is very easy to learn quickly and VERY consistent.

Either of these will give you good contact but getting the ball close depends on:

o Scoping out the green and reading the path the ball will take from a landing point

o Targeting that landing point and getting the ball to hit it

o Knowing how far the ball will roll out for the flight distance given the club you use

While I understand the advantages of always chipping with the same club I don't because I've bought into the 'land the ball as soon as possible' argument and with that you need to use the club that will give you the run you need for that landing point.

Peter
I'll go look for the Trevino clip, maybe it's on youtube. Maybe the Jones stuff is too, for that matter.

Probably one or the other is similar to the Runyan method. I tried that today on the practice green. It has potential. I agree with you as far as one swing, many clubs, versus using one club for all shots.

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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

May 18th, 2011, 12:00 am #7

I have to say that chipping is the most frustrating part of the game for me. I don't scoop or flip at the ball, but I find it hard to make consistent contact from shot to shot. I think I'm moving my head.

The other (bigger?) issue is that the clubs are fairly light, compared to say, a putter, and I find it hard to "feel" the right amount of swing and force to apply. Of course when I practice, I get better results. But it seems like it would take a heckuva lot of frequent practice time to stay sharp in chipping. The feel is just so delicate, to me. I always say I'm not an athlete. The fact that I do fairly well at golf is a minor miracle.

Your thoughts on chipping?
Geoff Mangum of the putting zone has a concept he calls the core putt. He describes making the core putt as follows -

...address the ball and make a very simple stroke to nowhere in particular -- the simpler the better, as few moving parts as possible -- as follows: initiate the backstroke with a little pushing off from the left shoulder rolling back to move the putterhead; when you first sense that taking the putterhead back any farther or higher will require some effort on your part by pushing or lifting as you feel the weight of the putterhead, just quit going back and relax; now let the putterhead fall back forward through the ball and roll the ball with good level contact just to see how far it will go. Simple.

You don't want to "hit" the ball; just let the putterhead freefall back through the impact zone. It's sort of like the putter is a hinged "pet door," and you just move the bottom of the door back out of vertical and then drop it and let it swing gently through the ball. The tempo is about what a baby elephant uses on a lazy day to swing his trunk lightly though the savannah grass.

And here's the link to the whole article about the core putt concept:

http://www.puttingzone.com/MyTips/core.html

He also describes the tempo of the putt as one potato two potato where you reach your back stroke length at the end of one potato, and you strike the ball as you begin to say two potato. This has your forward stroke slightly faster than your back stroke ensuring you have an accelerating putter through impact.

I have found these two ideas very helpful so far in my distance control on my putts, and so I decided to try and adopt the same concept on my chips....I want to develop a "core chip". A chip that I can make a repeating stroke with and I know will very closely have an easily repeatable distance.

I decided that my backstroke length would by the length that has my my trail hand cover my trail foot as I look down at the ball. Then, using the model of the core putt described above, I make a chipping stroke like Geoff describes in his tip above and as Robert does in this thread, just sorta let my wedge fall back down into the ball to the tempo of one potato two potato. I do this four times on manual and then four times on clearkey and it is remarkable how consistent the distance is with this method.

Now I have a baseline reference for all chips inside and outside this core length and I make the adjustments accordingly. For me it seems to work out that I add about 6 steps to my distance for every club. So if my core chip with my PW is 12 paces, the same core chip with 9i would be about 18 paces. I also have developed a core flop shot using the same approach. This is how I am working on my short game.

I wrote an article on my forum about chipping and I think I copied it here, but I couldn't find it...it is a good description of how to chip:

http://authenticgolf.net/simplemachines ... topic=80.0

Keep in mind, this is for a true chip....not a pitch...a chip is intended to land the ball as soon as possible on the putting surface and roll for most of its distance to the hole. Many players use the word chip to describe any short game shot.

It is also important to practice the way you would play. In a round of golf, we never rake ball after ball over and hit it the same way to the same location time after time. Each shot is different, so we should try and get as close to what would happen in a real round for short game shots.

After I have practiced my arsenal of shots; I play a round of golf on the practice green. I refer to my average number of greens missed( I'm keeping track now), and I drop that number of balls around the green all at different lies, distances, etc. I play the ball down, and I just try to get up and down on these shots. I play my third shot simulating my routine and everything just as if I were on the course. Then I go to my bag and get my putter, and hole out. If I make, it's a par...except on one hole where I pretend it is a par 5 that I just missed hitting with my second. If I get up and in on that one it's a bird.

After I play all those shots, I putt out the remainder of the balls on the greens that I hit in regulation. I give myself a few shorties knocked stiff for birdie chances, some mid-ranges, and some long lag putts including two par fives. I keep track of my score to par as I finish. This gives me real good practice under as close to match conditions as possible, and is a pretty good indication of how my short game stands up. Sad to I have yet to break par and I am still putting over 2 putts per GIR!

So that's what I am doing, but very little of it...thanks to the absolutely horrid conditions here. I have played a TOTAL of 36 holes of golf so far...LOL our first league night we joked that one of the skins should have been whoever shot the temperature! Just plain horrible.

Kevin

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 13th, 2001, 8:30 am

May 18th, 2011, 12:33 am #8

It has been rainy and cold here also which is rather unusual. I got rained on walking to lunch today!

I would like to comment on one of your points:
It is also important to practice the way you would play. In a round of golf, we never rake ball after ball over and hit it the same way to the same location time after time. Each shot is different, so we should try and get as close to what would happen in a real round for short game shots.

I like to hit 2 balls from each spot I think that allows my brain to learn a little more about how the ball is rolling and so on LOL hopefully anyway...

I think that there is also value in repeating the same shot over an over until you get it. It is a different kind of practice but can be valuable. Hogan practiced that way on days when he was working on his game. It has been reported that he would start with a 2 foot putt and hit it over and over with until he was satisfied and then move back to the next shot and then do the same until he was hitting full drivers into the green at the end of the day.

I think that both types of practice can be very valuable. I would say that your method makes a lot of sense warming up before a round especially...

Regards, Herbert
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

May 18th, 2011, 12:52 am #9

Notice I said "after I practice my arsenal of shots"...I do practice the same type of shot over and over...of course four on manual and four on clearkey.... but then I end with my "simulation round".

I do the same thing when hitting shots. I always try to end with at least eight shots "that mean something". I imagine a round I played or might play and immerse myself in the hole. Tell myself what happened on the previous shot, and why i am having to hit this punch, or that draw. And then I play the shot just as if i was in the match. LOL if I at the range, i go to the far end because I "talk things through" with my partner even...got some strange looks a few times.

It is so soggy here I have been reduced to hitting pitch shots with my birdie balls out of my my garage on matto my neighbor's driveway!

kevin

Never quit til you have a swing you'll never forget!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 18th, 2011, 2:12 am #10

I'll go look for the Trevino clip, maybe it's on youtube. Maybe the Jones stuff is too, for that matter.

Probably one or the other is similar to the Runyan method. I tried that today on the practice green. It has potential. I agree with you as far as one swing, many clubs, versus using one club for all shots.
The Jones clip is in this post as well as in the library.

The Trevino clip is from the show where Jim McLean analyzes Trevino's swing. There is a segment of it on YouTube but not the right one.

The swing shown in the Jones clip requires quite a bit more talent than it may seem. The 2.5 swing has the body static which makes it much easier. In both the club goes 'toe up to toe up' and this reduces the amount of backspin so that the ball rolls more. With the Trevino swing the club head stays perpendicular and you get more backspin.

Peter
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