Big grip experiment

Big grip experiment

Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 21st, 2011, 12:46 pm #1

I have had a Tacki-Mac Unified grip sitting around for a while. It's a non-tapered, inch or larger diameter. (I think I recall measuring it at 1.10" one time.) Pretty darn big. In photos it looks very similar to what BGG sold/sells. So anyway I put it on one of my drivers. Not my current one but my previous one, which was always very dependable.

I tried it on the range. Holy crap. I hit two high pushes to the right. WAY right. The clubface was wide-open at impact. I was sort of in shock. So I quickly grabbed my regular driver, which has a built up Tour Velvet midsize grip. Straight down the middle. I've never seen this sort of difference from a club's grip. I mean, it was crazy. Now, the big grip does weigh ~25 grams more, with buildup accounted for. Maybe that was more significant than the size. I dunno. But I thought it was interesting.

If you really fight a hook, that grip might be worth a try.
Last edited by Snowman9000 on September 21st, 2011, 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 26th, 2007, 12:53 am

September 21st, 2011, 6:09 pm #2

Four or five years ago, I installed BGG grips on all my golf clubs. I should have experimented a little before putting these large grips on all clubs. I hit my driver and fairway woods high right, and my irons went all directions, very inconsistent flight patterns. I switched back to mid-size grips and the inconsistency went away. All the BGG grips ended up in the trash can (had to cut them off to change grips to mid-size). Lesson learned: on grip changes, experiment on 1 or 2 clubs before changing everything in the bag.

AllenG
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Joined: December 5th, 2002, 1:33 pm

September 22nd, 2011, 11:31 am #3

Or use air to put them on. Then you can change them any time you want to by blowing them off with a little puff of air and you never need solvent or double sided tape, only masking tape. The 2" wide tape is best.
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 22nd, 2011, 12:19 pm #4

Four or five years ago, I installed BGG grips on all my golf clubs. I should have experimented a little before putting these large grips on all clubs. I hit my driver and fairway woods high right, and my irons went all directions, very inconsistent flight patterns. I switched back to mid-size grips and the inconsistency went away. All the BGG grips ended up in the trash can (had to cut them off to change grips to mid-size). Lesson learned: on grip changes, experiment on 1 or 2 clubs before changing everything in the bag.

AllenG
Makes me wonder if the results were more because of the weight or the size.
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Joined: October 26th, 2007, 12:53 am

September 22nd, 2011, 11:00 pm #5

Or use air to put them on. Then you can change them any time you want to by blowing them off with a little puff of air and you never need solvent or double sided tape, only masking tape. The 2" wide tape is best.
Jerry, I've read about using air to remove grips, but have never tried it. I'm getting close to needing new grips, sounds like I need to give the air method a try. Thanks for the suggestion.

AllenG
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 23rd, 2011, 2:30 am #6

Makes me wonder if the results were more because of the weight or the size.
The past few rounds I have had more fades than anything with my driver. This seemed to crop up suddenly. After the big grip experiment on my spare driver, I realized that maybe it was because my regular driver now had considerable build-up under the lower hand, to take away almost all of the taper. I had switched to that a couple of weeks ago as a result of trying it on a few other clubs. Today I switched back to what had been on it all summer, a regular midsize grip with no buildup.

The fades went bye-bye. The more I thought about it, I noticed which clubs were helped by the built-up grips and which were not. My clubs that are hooky were helped. (Hybrids, mostly.) It seems to make a difference for me. Heck, a month or so ago I tried .580's with no buildup, and soon everything was going left. I ditched those but didn't really take note of it, I guess. I had decided I didn't like the feel.

I was always going by what felt best, and not noticing how the shots might have been affected.
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Joined: December 5th, 2002, 1:33 pm

September 23rd, 2011, 1:47 pm #7

Jerry, I've read about using air to remove grips, but have never tried it. I'm getting close to needing new grips, sounds like I need to give the air method a try. Thanks for the suggestion.

AllenG
Once you do it you'll never go back to the other sloppy way. The grips hold just as well and there's no mess. Plus it's faster. I use a small air compressor that I got from Sears but any air compressor will do. I've hear of guys using things like bicycle pumps but I think that would be slow. People use different techniques like putting a piece of pvc just large enough to easily slide over the grip, etc. but basically it's all the same. The purpose of the pvc is to keep too much air from suddenly expanding the grip enough to burst it. After doing this a while I found I didn't need the pvc or any special tools. Just the AC with the air pressure regulated enough to expand the grip to slide it on or off with short bursts. Once the grip is on a short burst or two of air while you twist it will let you line it up perfectly the way you want. It's good to wet the tip opening of the grip to help slide it over the shaft but you don't need to saturate the whole inside of it. A small nozzle on the air hose that will fit the little opening at the top of the grip works best. I think there have been demonstrations of doing this on youtube so go there and look for it. If you google you can find discussions about it as well I think. Most people use a vise to hold the shaft but I find I don't need to do this. Actually I use no special tools at all other than the air compressor with the right nozzle. Again, the best masking tape is the 2" wide rolls. After doing your buildups for the lower hand run a length all the way over so that the grip sliding on or off doesn't get caught up with exposed, varying lengths of tape. Good luck.
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Joined: October 26th, 2007, 12:53 am

September 24th, 2011, 5:49 pm #8

Thanks again, Jerry. I'm going to give this method a try. I've replaced grips in the past using the water activated grip tape, but that's still a mess. Solvent activated tape is even messier. The air method sound much easier.

AllenG
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Joined: August 16th, 2005, 10:50 am

September 25th, 2011, 12:09 am #9

I made this video last year to show people on this forum how to do it. Since then it has gotten almost 70,000 views. Not bad for something that doesn't have talking animals or dancing babies.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd3Qzz3m4cg

Here's one I made yesterday to answer questions about how to remove a grip that was installed normally, with sticky tape:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOGER9xVnQg
Last edited by Snowman9000 on September 25th, 2011, 11:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 5th, 2002, 1:33 pm

September 25th, 2011, 12:44 am #10

Small world, Don. Your video is the one I watched when I started using this method. Glad to see it's still up as it is a fantastic video tutorial. Glad you posted it here.
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