Bertholy Question.

Bertholy Question.

Joined: July 20th, 2004, 9:50 pm

March 10th, 2006, 4:28 pm #1

Were there any pga level golfers that bertholy coached in his day. He seems to have a following at amatuer level. Only asking from curiosity standpoint, not in a confrontational manner. thanks
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 10th, 2006, 5:48 pm #2

Bertholy was an instructor to PGA teaching pros. In addition to touring the country and conducting regional seminars for PGA pros, Bertholy also taught at PGA national meetings and had a number of now famous teachers do internships with him.

While Bertholy did not teach any famous PGA Tour pros to my knowledge if you look at the students of some who did internships with him (and used his terminology in trainging aids they marketed) you would have quite a few 'names' from todays PGA, LPGA, European and Champions tours.

Peter
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Joined: January 23rd, 2005, 12:18 pm

March 10th, 2006, 8:44 pm #3


On several occasions during my encounter with Paul Bertholy he spoke of a student of his named Leo Biagetti who Paul said was the "best boy golfer in the world." But Paul spoke wistfully about this Leo and always lamented that Leo was a "victim of the war". By Paul's references to Leo's accomplishments as a junior golfer I came to believe that Leo was killed during the Korean War.

It was some years later that my interest in golf history, golf artifacts and golf memorabilia led me to a small cache of official score cards from the 1958 Western Open. To my surprise one of those cards bore the name of "Leo Biagetti"! He shot a 75 for that 2nd round to go along with a 69 he shot on the first day. I purchased that score card for about $5 as I recall and I still have it. I just dug it out to look at it. The event was held at Red Run Golf Club in Detroit Michigan on May 29 - June 1, 1958. The player who signed Leo's card on May 30 was Frank J. Metzger.

Further research into Leo Biagetti revealed that he was a very decent professional golfer in the 1950's. He played in a handful of U.S. Opens and many tour events, cashing checks here and there. I never found out what became of him.

That Paul would refer to Leo only in the past tense leads me to believe that either Leo was so physically or emotionally impaired by the Korean War that he left the Bertholy family or that after the war he split from Bertholy for some reason and Bertholy simply attributed the fall out to the war. It would seem to me that Paul might be a tough person for a young man to be around all the time - too many hard and fast rules. Paul said that Leo was his "son", but I don't know if he used the term figuratively or if Leo was adopted by the Bertholy's or what.

In any case, I think that the mysterious Leo Biagetti is one tour calibre golfer that seems to have been developed by Paul Bertholy. Perhaps some other members of this forum have some insights to add in this department?

Tom
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Joined: April 22nd, 2004, 9:58 pm

March 10th, 2006, 9:07 pm #4

Leo Biagetti -- 1950s PGA golfer from Sandusky. Eight-time qualifier for U.S. Open and five-time qualifier for PGA. Assistant pro at Fairlawn Country Club in 1960s.

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Joined: January 23rd, 2005, 12:18 pm

March 10th, 2006, 9:50 pm #5

Were there any pga level golfers that bertholy coached in his day. He seems to have a following at amatuer level. Only asking from curiosity standpoint, not in a confrontational manner. thanks
I think a lot of Bertholy's students were frustrated adult golfers, those who had hit a wall in their golf improvement and were frustrated by their lack of progress in the game. For them Bertholy represented a desperate last chance. Although he was a tireless self promoter I don't think that he was the type that would be interested in recruiting a child prodigy and riding the kid to fame and fortune. Paul was very much his own man who believed in himself. If anything he would have his students become independent of him in a golf sense ASAP. He often said that once a student learned the positions and the drills all that was necessary was persistence and hard work. He told me that a 10 year old could teach the Bertholy Method once he understood it for himself.

Also, Bertholy didn't work cheap. He charged top dollar for his services. He said that a professional had to be paid as a professional if he was to maintain his self esteem. Not too many youngsters could afford Bertholy's instruction. And those who could would quickly find that Bertholy would be a hard taskmaster who would not think the kid was God's gift to the world just because he could hit a golf ball well.

Tom
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 10th, 2006, 9:50 pm #6

Leo Biagetti -- 1950s PGA golfer from Sandusky. Eight-time qualifier for U.S. Open and five-time qualifier for PGA. Assistant pro at Fairlawn Country Club in 1960s.
was where Bertholy started and created a Golf Center.

Peter
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:22 pm

March 11th, 2006, 5:24 am #7

My home course is Sawmill Creek, located just a mile or so from the site of Paul's former range. He had a little quonset hut looking thing on Route 6. It eventually got sold once Route 2/90 was finished. One of the regulars at our club's shag range is Dave Logan... a very popular local golf coach/ guru...old school. I asked him about Paul. He said he remembered him as a quite a character..."He was very opinionated about the golf swing and made those heavy clubs...it was his way or no way...very demanding but very kind. I didn't agree with everything he taught, but you couldn't argue with his results"

I also have spoken with Jack Waldock, the Sandusky businessman Doug writes about in GSC 101 ( pg 115 ). He ( at the time ) still played out of Plum Brook and had nothing but great things to say about Paul. When I was "chasing him down" the repsect of those I talked with for "Mr. Waldock" was impressive.

Sandusky is most famous for Cedar Point. Home to several top shelf roller coasters and an absolute scream of a good time. If any of you head up this way, give me a shout and we'll go do the dragster ( after our golf ). It is absolutely the best for coasters, with three that break the 100 mph barrier. This year my youngest will be 48 inches and able to ride most all...yeah baby!!!

http://www.cedarpoint.com/public/inside ... hrill/ttd/
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Joined: October 29th, 2004, 1:25 pm

March 11th, 2006, 2:00 pm #8

On several occasions during my encounter with Paul Bertholy he spoke of a student of his named Leo Biagetti who Paul said was the "best boy golfer in the world." But Paul spoke wistfully about this Leo and always lamented that Leo was a "victim of the war". By Paul's references to Leo's accomplishments as a junior golfer I came to believe that Leo was killed during the Korean War.

It was some years later that my interest in golf history, golf artifacts and golf memorabilia led me to a small cache of official score cards from the 1958 Western Open. To my surprise one of those cards bore the name of "Leo Biagetti"! He shot a 75 for that 2nd round to go along with a 69 he shot on the first day. I purchased that score card for about $5 as I recall and I still have it. I just dug it out to look at it. The event was held at Red Run Golf Club in Detroit Michigan on May 29 - June 1, 1958. The player who signed Leo's card on May 30 was Frank J. Metzger.

Further research into Leo Biagetti revealed that he was a very decent professional golfer in the 1950's. He played in a handful of U.S. Opens and many tour events, cashing checks here and there. I never found out what became of him.

That Paul would refer to Leo only in the past tense leads me to believe that either Leo was so physically or emotionally impaired by the Korean War that he left the Bertholy family or that after the war he split from Bertholy for some reason and Bertholy simply attributed the fall out to the war. It would seem to me that Paul might be a tough person for a young man to be around all the time - too many hard and fast rules. Paul said that Leo was his "son", but I don't know if he used the term figuratively or if Leo was adopted by the Bertholy's or what.

In any case, I think that the mysterious Leo Biagetti is one tour calibre golfer that seems to have been developed by Paul Bertholy. Perhaps some other members of this forum have some insights to add in this department?

Tom
Tom; I spent a lot of time with Paul during the 1980s and the 1990s and got the same idea that you did about Leo. I also think that Doug Ferreri did to.
Harry Mapp
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Joined: January 23rd, 2005, 12:18 pm

March 11th, 2006, 3:49 pm #9


Harry - When you say that you got the same idea about Leo from Bertholy, did you mean that you also thought that Leo had died in the war? What do you make of the fact that Leo did not die in the war but instead went on to have a career in golf? Also, can you relate to the group any of your personal experiences or impressions of Paul Bertholy or his teachings or Method?

Tom
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Joined: June 19th, 2012, 5:33 pm

June 19th, 2012, 5:39 pm #10

On several occasions during my encounter with Paul Bertholy he spoke of a student of his named Leo Biagetti who Paul said was the "best boy golfer in the world." But Paul spoke wistfully about this Leo and always lamented that Leo was a "victim of the war". By Paul's references to Leo's accomplishments as a junior golfer I came to believe that Leo was killed during the Korean War.

It was some years later that my interest in golf history, golf artifacts and golf memorabilia led me to a small cache of official score cards from the 1958 Western Open. To my surprise one of those cards bore the name of "Leo Biagetti"! He shot a 75 for that 2nd round to go along with a 69 he shot on the first day. I purchased that score card for about $5 as I recall and I still have it. I just dug it out to look at it. The event was held at Red Run Golf Club in Detroit Michigan on May 29 - June 1, 1958. The player who signed Leo's card on May 30 was Frank J. Metzger.

Further research into Leo Biagetti revealed that he was a very decent professional golfer in the 1950's. He played in a handful of U.S. Opens and many tour events, cashing checks here and there. I never found out what became of him.

That Paul would refer to Leo only in the past tense leads me to believe that either Leo was so physically or emotionally impaired by the Korean War that he left the Bertholy family or that after the war he split from Bertholy for some reason and Bertholy simply attributed the fall out to the war. It would seem to me that Paul might be a tough person for a young man to be around all the time - too many hard and fast rules. Paul said that Leo was his "son", but I don't know if he used the term figuratively or if Leo was adopted by the Bertholy's or what.

In any case, I think that the mysterious Leo Biagetti is one tour calibre golfer that seems to have been developed by Paul Bertholy. Perhaps some other members of this forum have some insights to add in this department?

Tom
Leo's brother Alfred rad a nine hole public course in Sandusky, where I played as a young boy. From what i've heard Leo was shell shocked from the Korean war. In the late 60's and early 70's he was in and out of the VA hospital. One time when i was at Keys Leo came out and Leo, Al, and myself went out to play. Leo was in street clothes, dress shirt,shoes and overweight. At the time it was his first time of picking a club up in 5 years. He was 7 under par after 7 holes and quit says he was tired of playing already. The course record at the time was 32 4 under. I was amazed.
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