I Cor 3:17

nikolai_42
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nikolai_42
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Joined: October 4th, 2013, 5:12 pm

April 24th, 2018, 9:05 pm #1

{The usual disclaimer applies here. I am assuming this is a Greek question about the meaning and context of the words. But if it is more properly dealt with in another subforum, please don't hesitate to move it.}

Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?
 If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.

   I Corinthians 3:16-17

This is a question about 2 small words - in and you.

In verse 16 above, Paul tells the Corinthians that they are the temple of God (the church) that the Spirit of God dwells in them as the church. But sometimes I have trouble distinguishing between the personal and the corporate. In verse 16, Paul says that the Spirit dwells in the Corinthians. As an english speaking reader, my mind sees that as a statement of personal import. The Spirit of God indwells each individual believer. But verse 17 says that if anyone defiles the temple of God, God will destroy him. The reason being that the temple of God is not a building. So verse 17 seems (at least at the beginning) to have an individual context. But the ending says ye (i.e. plural you) are the temple of God (echoing the beginning of verse 16). It puts me in mind of Jesus' statement in Luke 17:21

And when he was demanded of the Pharisees, when the kingdom of God should come, he answered them and said, The kingdom of God cometh not with observation:
Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.
   Luke 17:20-21

 And to emphasize the invisibility of the kingdom of God, Jesus said this as well :

 
And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you:

 And heal the sick that are therein, and say unto them, The kingdom of God is come nigh unto you.
 But into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not, go your ways out into the streets of the same, and say,
 Even the very dust of your city, which cleaveth on us, we do wipe off against you: notwithstanding be ye sure of this, that the kingdom of God is come nigh unto you.
 But I say unto you, that it shall be more tolerable in that day for Sodom, than for that city.
  Luke 10:8-12

The Jews were expecting national deliverance and Jesus came to them with evidence of the kingdom that would not be known politically. And while it isn't my intention to discuss eschatology, it seems that Jesus' emphasis (therefore) would even be on the authority of the kingdom rather than pointing to an outward kingdom in terms of geography and politics :

So likewise ye, when ye see these things come to pass, know ye that the kingdom of God is nigh at hand.
   Luke 21:31

Of course, that last statement is pregnant with so much (to us who have the benefit of the Revelation of John) so I only make mention of that to try and put some context into Jesus' words in Luke 10. The question remains there, though - is the kingdom within or among the people? I suppose both could be true - within the individual and among the people of God as the church - but what does the Greek say on this point? Was Jesus saying the kingdom was in the midst of the Pharisees (even if they weren't citizens thereof) or was He saying that because He was near them, so was the kingdom (likewise the disciples in Luke 10)?Are both the invididual and the church as a whole the temple of God (in the context of Paul's writing to the Corinthians, at least) or is it more one or the other? Does the Greek clarify this?
If God promises life, He slayeth first; when He builds, He casteth all down first. God is no patcher; He cannot build on another's foundation. - William Tyndale
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Ask Mr. Religion
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Joined: July 28th, 2008, 9:13 am

April 26th, 2018, 8:11 pm #2

Worth reading:


We each have a "temple" aspect personally: 1 Cor. 6:19

We together as the body form a temple: Eph. 2:21

When we gather for corporate worship, the Temple of God "appears" (Hebrews 12:22 and forward). The Temple is not limited to one geographic locale (John 4:21 and forward). Rather it is an inbreaking of Heaven and eternity into our moment, the cosmic intersection of Heaven and earth (see Gen. 28:12,17 and John 1:51).

Which leads to Jesus, the Temple (Mark 14:58), entering the heavenly temple (Heb. 9:24 and Rev. 11:19).
AMR (a.k.a. Patrick)
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nikolai_42
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nikolai_42
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Joined: October 4th, 2013, 5:12 pm

May 3rd, 2018, 9:07 pm #3

Ask Mr. Religion wrote: Worth reading:


We each have a "temple" aspect personally: 1 Cor. 6:19

We together as the body form a temple: Eph. 2:21

When we gather for corporate worship, the Temple of God "appears" (Hebrews 12:22 and forward). The Temple is not limited to one geographic locale (John 4:21 and forward). Rather it is an inbreaking of Heaven and eternity into our moment, the cosmic intersection of Heaven and earth (see Gen. 28:12,17 and John 1:51).

Which leads to Jesus, the Temple (Mark 14:58), entering the heavenly temple (Heb. 9:24 and Rev. 11:19).
Thank you Patrick! For some reason my browser didn't want to show the link to the book until I quoted your post. And I do want to get that. I have "enjoyed" Beale's book on idolatry as well (We Become What We Worship). Hopefully I can get a paper copy of this book...
If God promises life, He slayeth first; when He builds, He casteth all down first. God is no patcher; He cannot build on another's foundation. - William Tyndale
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