English Translation of the Septuagint

Topics related to Biblical languages.
Gord
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Gord
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Joined: 13 Jun 2009, 14:24

04 Dec 2011, 03:17 #11

I have looked at the HCSB reverse interlinear by WordSearch. My WS library is far more extensive then my Logos library, however my question is and I quote from their website:
Traditionally, multi-line Interlinear Bibles start with the original text in its corresponding original language, but this Holman Christian Standard Bible Old and New Testament Reverse Interlinear starts with the English word as found in the Holman Christian Standard Bible. This allows the student of God's Word to begin their study in their native language and move into the Biblical language, which can be a tremendous help for those who are new to language studies! The included Holman Christian Standard Bible, serves as an optimal-equivalence translation, meaning it is a word-for-word translation styled to clearly communicate to English readers. The Holman Christian Standard Bible was translated using the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia for the Old Testament and the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, 27th edition and the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament, Fourth corrected edition for the New Testament.

Directly beneath the English translation is the text of the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia for the Old Testament and the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament, Fourth edition for the New Testament. The Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia is the fourth edition of the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible as preserved in the Leningrad Codex, and supplemented by masoretic and text-critical notes. It is published by the Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (German Bible Society) in Stuttgart. The Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia was prepared by H. P. Rger and numerous other scholars on the basis of the St. Petersburg Public Library manuscript B19a and is a revision of the third edition of the Biblia Hebraica edited by Rudolf Kittel, the first printed Bible based on the Leningrad Codex. The United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament, Fourth edition text is identical to the text of the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, Twenty-seventh edition with the exception of a few differences in punctuation. The United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament, was established by an international and inter-confessional meeting and is considered the leading edition of the Greek New Testament. Both the Hebrew and Greek texts include superscript numbers to indicate the word order of the passage in the original language.
Ask Mr. Religion:15425 wrote:There are generally two interlinears- forward and reverse.

The forward type usually have the Greek text on one line, then below each word is a Greek transliteration and below that word is an English word. Also included may be Strong's numbers, tenses, etc.

The reverse type have the English and then the Greek below the English.

Here is an example of a reverse interlinear:

http://www.wordsearchbible.com/catalog/ ... _3487.html

An example of a forward interlinear:

http://www.wordsearchbible.com/catalog/ ... rodid=1055

One of my favorite interlinears:
Is this the best manuscript to study from, what about the TR? What about the Septuigent?
Is there a reverse interlinear that works in the translated text of the default bible, IE: KJV, ESV etc?

This is all new to me, I looks like a great tool, it's expensive so I want to get the one that gets me closest to the original text as possible, it that makes any sense.

If I read the comparison chart at Logos correctly, the following are included:

ESV EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear of the New Testament
ESV EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear of the Old Testament
NEW! KJV Cambridge Paragraph EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! KJV Cambridge Paragraph EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NEW! KJV EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! KJV EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NEW! LEB EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NASB95 EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NASB95 EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NIV EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NIV EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NKJV EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NKJV EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NLT EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NLT EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear
NRSV EnglishGreek Reverse Interlinear
NEW! NRSV EnglishHebrew Reverse Interlinear

To me this looks as if, I could compare KJV ESV and NASB from their translations, and for what I want may be the better choice, as WS is restricted to the HCSB bible.
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Ask Mr. Religion
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Joined: 28 Jul 2008, 09:13

04 Dec 2011, 04:06 #12

Gord:15445 wrote:Is this the best manuscript to study from, what about the TR? What about the Septuigent?
Gord,

The HCSB, ESV, and most other modern translations use the UBS4, NA27, or "eclectic texts" (combinations of various manuscripts, for the NT. If you want TR for the NT you have to go with KJV or NKJV translations.

I don't see a big need for the Septuagint unless you are just interested in a Greek OT translation.
Is there a reverse interlinear that works in the translated text of the default Bible, IE: KJV, ESV etc?
There is a reverse interlinear of the ESV NT available:



If you have online access to the ESV at esvonline.org you can purchase the Greek Tools add on for the ESV at a small cost that will do nicely for that translation.
This is all new to me, I looks like a great tool, it's expensive so I want to get the one that gets me closest to the original text as possible, it that makes any sense.
If you are a fan of the TR or Byzantine manuscripts then the HCSB reverse interlinear will not meet your needs. If you want to have Alexandrian and Byzantine manuscript language access, then the HCSB reverse interlinear will solve the Alexandrian need nicely, and one of the KJV and NKJV interlinears in you list will meet the TR/Byzantine need. But, as you note, having everything in one place, such as in Logos, would be more pragmatic.

Have you looked at Bibleworks? http://www.bibleworks.com/

If all you are interested in will be language and exegesis, BW may be a better way to go.

http://www.bibleworks.com/content/full.html

Logos is more like Wordsearch on steroids, with huge libraries of books of all types as well as language tools. You may have to price things out, but I think BW may be a wee bit cheaper if all you want is language and exegetical tools.[POSTCOMMENTMYFFIPC15446]
AMR (a.k.a. Patrick)
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Gord
RTI Guru
Gord
RTI Guru
Joined: 13 Jun 2009, 14:24

26 Jun 2012, 01:52 #13

Ask Mr. Religion:15425 wrote:There are generally two interlinears- forward and reverse.

The forward type usually have the Greek text on one line, then below each word is a Greek transliteration and below that word is an English word. Also included may be Strong's numbers, tenses, etc.

The reverse type have the English and then the Greek below the English.

Here is an example of a reverse interlinear:

http://www.wordsearchbible.com/catalog/ ... _3487.html

An example of a forward interlinear:

http://www.wordsearchbible.com/catalog/ ... rodid=1055

One of my favorite interlinears:
Now that WordSearch and LifeWay are one, I can link my WordSearch Library to My Study Bible which was originally HCSB, but now has my entire WS library resources too.  I think I will take advantage of their 50% off phone in sale before the end of the month for the HCSB interlinear package, and upgrade to v10 also.

The  My Study Bible gives you a lot of info on mouse hovers that aren't quite there in WS, and you can follow along with the video if your too lazy to read.  :yes:
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Ask Mr. Religion
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Joined: 28 Jul 2008, 09:13

27 Jun 2012, 04:33 #14

Good tips, Gord! Was unaware that I could link WS10 with the HCSB site.
AMR (a.k.a. Patrick)
Do You Confess?
Faculty PRBS
My Randomata Blog
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