Soca Princesses get food...at last

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Soca Princesses get food...at last

TheRoonBa
Joined: 31 Oct 2006, 22:16

11 Oct 2014, 13:46 #1

Amazing story - Trinidad & Tobago women's national team were sent to Gold Cup preparations in the USA with only $500 and no training gear or food (the tournament begins next week).  Their coach works for free, and he was forced to send out a Tweet for help to pay for meals for the players.  The Haiti team, which is also struggling, had raised $1,300 of its own to fund their preparations, but donated this to Trinidad & Tobago when they heard about their plight.
Despite this, the TTFA are saying that his plea for help was disrespectful!  What about sending a team of ladies to the US with only around $25 each?  That isn't disrespectful?  Seriously, some people need to get a grip.

http://www.newsday.co.tt/news/0,201446.html
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nfm24
Joined: 07 Apr 2007, 16:28

12 Oct 2014, 18:57 #2

It would never have happened in Jack Warner's day. Bring back Jack!
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mattsanger92
Joined: 04 Jul 2011, 10:46

04 Apr 2017, 19:36 #3

So obviously not quite as dire a case as the original, but Ireland's women's team are planning a strike over apparently lengthy neglect that includes tracksuit-sharing with the youth teams and getting changed in public toilets. This block of text is the tip of the iceberg that showcases how better management and/or having a person in charge not named budget Jack Warner John Delaney might have solved such avoidable problems. Maybe the women's team's accounts can be balanced by some of that new money coming in?
In general, is this a good place to mention any cases of a national team or tournament (whether men's, women's, youth, variant, or whatever) getting less than an 'international-standard' treatment, or is it a topic worthy of a separate thread?
Last edited by mattsanger92 on 04 Apr 2017, 19:38, edited 1 time in total.
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mattsanger92
Joined: 04 Jul 2011, 10:46

19 Nov 2017, 19:41 #4

Don't know enough about the specific situation to comment on whether it deserved such an extreme reaction, but the Danish women's team strike over equal pay that caused a World Cup Qualifier against Sweden to be forfeited has been met with a suspended ban by UEFA.
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nfm24
Joined: 07 Apr 2007, 16:28

20 Nov 2017, 18:04 #5

What a disappointing reaction from the administrators...

Maybe the Denmark men's team should do the same in the World Cup next summer (thus paving the way for Scotland to come in as last minute replacements and "do a Denmark" on Denmark).
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mattsanger92
Joined: 04 Jul 2011, 10:46

20 Nov 2017, 21:24 #6

Surely by Denmark '92 logic that place would go to Ireland? But then again Ireland had their own episode of mistreating their women's team this year, so if that gets protested too I guess the place will just have to go to the team Ireland beat to get into the Play-Offs, whoever that was...
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TheRoonBa
Joined: 31 Oct 2006, 22:16

20 Nov 2017, 22:43 #7

They weren't striking for equal pay, just better pay and conditions.  The Danish FA was trying to make them "not employees" of the Danish FA, which they rejected.  Because they couldn't reach an agreement, they did the best thing they could think of to protest.  The Danish men's team had even offered to give them some of their money, but the Danish FA rejected this proposal and also a proposal to give them the same basic rights in their contract as the men's team.

Danish FA was at fault here for not sorting it out sooner.  The women just wanted some fairness.  Especially after finishing as unexpected runners-up of the Euros, and being regularly in the Top 16 in the world for the past several years, you'd think the Danish FA could have treated them a bit better.

You've got to remember that there's hardly any money in the women's game for a lot of countries, yet they are still expected to play all these qualifying matches and represent their country.  FAs should devote a bit more money to women's football, or just get rid of their women's national team if they can't treat them fairly.
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nfm24
Joined: 07 Apr 2007, 16:28

20 Nov 2017, 23:03 #8

Exactly.   And this was a real opportunity for UEFA (or FIFA) to put the onus on the DBU officials, and not so much on the women players.  Bottled.

The parallel situation simply would not have happened had a major men's team (e.g. Euros runners-up France) taken a similar stance.
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mattsanger92
Joined: 04 Jul 2011, 10:46

Yesterday, 14:53 #9

TheRoonBa wrote: They weren't striking for equal pay, just better pay and conditions.
Fair enough, I knew someone as well as Ireland had been trying to get this just couldn't remember who. DBU's fault then especially if they're rejecting the men's offer too. "No, you keep your additional money that you say you don't really need and are happy to voluntarliy give up, [fill in nonsensical argument here]."
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mattsanger92
Joined: 04 Jul 2011, 10:46

Yesterday, 15:06 #10

nfm24 wrote: Exactly.   And this was a real opportunity for UEFA (or FIFA) to put the onus on the DBU officials, and not so much on the women players.  Bottled.

The parallel situation simply would not have happened had a major men's team (e.g. Euros runners-up France) taken a similar stance.
Similar to the 'Gibraltar trying to enter UEFA' situation when Spain threatened to withdraw from all UEFA competitions, UEFA should have just let them and watch them crawl back later.

Although in that instance they included Spanish clubs in the argument (fun to see how that would have gone down in Barcelona if it was all happening now (or still then really, but mostly now)), with that cash cow in the way UEFA were scared of letting it tip over (even though the clubs would probably have counter-pressured the Spanish FA and made them cave in in a positive use of club power).
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nfm24
Joined: 07 Apr 2007, 16:28

Yesterday, 18:52 #11

UEFA were probably unable to bring themselves to reprimand the DBU because they can't force members to pay players the same anyway, and they don't have control of this.  E.g. players from say Malta are on vastly different fees from say England.   UEFA probably just thought based only on the issues that they have control and jurisdiction over - a team declined to play a match, which is a punishable offence.  The real issues behind it probably were not even considered by UEFA.

I wonder if it might be one for the Danish legal people - gender discrimination, unequal pay etc. 
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