International players who are named after a famous footballer

Joined: December 26th, 2008, 11:44 am

November 13th, 2017, 8:05 am #1

It happens children are named after a footballer by their parents. Neeskens Kebano  is one of them. His father was a great admirer of former Dutch football star Johan Neeskens. Later his son became an international player for Congo-Kinshasa. Are there more international players named after a renomated footballer?
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

November 13th, 2017, 10:07 am #2

Gavril Pele Balint (Romania)
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

November 13th, 2017, 10:08 am #3

I assume we don't count nicknames e.g. Müller (Brazil) or Maniche (Portugal) ?
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Joined: December 26th, 2008, 11:44 am

November 13th, 2017, 12:06 pm #4

you are right, no nicknames. Only names given by birth.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

November 13th, 2017, 12:33 pm #5

Paulo Roberto Falcão (Brazil) "gives" his name to the Colombian forward Falcao.
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

November 13th, 2017, 8:06 pm #6

Ryan Zico Black
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

November 16th, 2017, 5:20 am #7

Brazilian stars inspire so many parents: Romario Benzar is a Romanian international and Jairzinho Serrano played for Panama. While Valdano Paul of Haiti was surely named after the Argentinian world champion Jorge Valdano.

I am sure nobody in Italy in the next years will name his children after "Gabbiadini" or "Parolo"...😖
Last edited by Luca on January 18th, 2018, 2:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

November 17th, 2017, 5:39 am #8

Wow, this is a true legend      Rivelino de Leça of the Netherlands Antilles.


While the former Italian international Eusebio Di Francesco was named after the Portuguese star Eusébio
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

November 17th, 2017, 7:11 am #9

Oscar Boniek Garcia (Honduras)

Rivaldo Coetzee (South Africa)

Apparently Dennis Bergkamp was named after Denis Law.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

December 1st, 2017, 5:25 am #10

Being born in 1998, Ronaldo Damus of Haiti surely takes his name from "O Fenômeno"
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Joined: April 5th, 2012, 10:54 am

December 1st, 2017, 5:40 am #11

Luca wrote: While the former Italian international Eusebio Di Francesco was named after the Portuguese star Eusébio
The Black Panther also inspired the name of Euzebiusz Smolarek.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

December 29th, 2017, 4:42 am #12

I have found out another case: the Italian international Éder was named in tribute to the former Brazilian star Éder.
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Joined: January 16th, 2018, 12:58 pm

January 16th, 2018, 1:01 pm #13

Hi, this is my first post to the forum, but I think it's a good start. How about David Rhys George Best Cotterill of Wales.
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

January 16th, 2018, 3:40 pm #14

Good one.  I suppose there must be many more cases of (normally unseen) middle names.
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

January 16th, 2018, 3:46 pm #15

Marco Asensio was reportedly named after Marco van Basten.

Marco van Basten's brother Stanley was named after Sir Stanley Matthews.

Sir Stanley Matthews named his own son.... Stanley Matthews.   Stanley junior was a tennis player, not a footballer.
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Joined: January 16th, 2018, 12:58 pm

January 16th, 2018, 6:19 pm #16

There's also New Zealand's Louis Ferenc Puskas Fenton. I guess Shilton Paul (or Pal) of India is probably another one. There's also the case of "football names". In yesterday's CHAN, for instance, Equatorial Guinea fielded Santiago Bocari Eneme, aka Benzema, and Joaquin Obama Edu, aka Verratti. Platini and Stopirra have been turning out for Cape Verde for some years now. And Kuwait had a player called Platini back in 1988. Oh sorry, that was the real one!
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

January 18th, 2018, 2:27 pm #17

Jamaica's Romario Williams.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

January 19th, 2018, 2:40 pm #18

How many "Romarios"!

Barbados' Romario Harewood;

Jamaica's Romario Campbell;

Ecuador's Romario Caicedo;

Ecuador's Romario Ibarra;

and even... Saint Kitts and Nevis' Romario Martin!
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

January 20th, 2018, 4:29 pm #19

Let's hope there are some Bebetos to partner up with them.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

February 3rd, 2018, 5:27 am #20

I suspect Edson Arantes do Nascimento "Pelé" inspires Arantes Lawrence of Barbados...
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Joined: July 4th, 2011, 6:46 am

February 9th, 2018, 3:50 am #21

The Kazakhstani futsal player "Higuita". One of their Brazilian-born naturalised citizens, he's also an eccentric goalkeeper that acts as a fly, which makes you wonder which came first - the player or the nickname?
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

February 9th, 2018, 4:57 am #22

Is it possible for futsal goalkeepers to come way out of their areas and act as sweepers?  Or are the rules more like informal 5-a-side football, the goalkeeper is confined to his area (and no other player may enter the area)?
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Joined: July 4th, 2011, 6:46 am

February 9th, 2018, 5:09 am #23

nfm24 wrote:Is it possible for futsal goalkeepers to come way out of their areas and act as sweepers?
You tell me...


But yes it looks like a big part of the game. If a team's chasing a game they'll often stick a (pre-printed) goalkeeper shirt on an outfielder, making them the designated keeper but acting more like the 'extra man' in ice hockey when a keeper gets pulled. Higuita just seems to be a keeper that's more comfortable playing further forward anyway.
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Joined: October 31st, 2006, 5:16 pm

February 11th, 2018, 5:56 am #24

mattsanger92 wrote:
nfm24 wrote:Is it possible for futsal goalkeepers to come way out of their areas and act as sweepers?
You tell me...


But yes it looks like a big part of the game. If a team's chasing a game they'll often stick a (pre-printed) goalkeeper shirt on an outfielder, making them the designated keeper but acting more like the 'extra man' in ice hockey when a keeper gets pulled. Higuita just seems to be a keeper that's more comfortable playing further forward anyway.
This may be a case of confirmation bias, but it seems to me that the majority of times this happens in futsal or ice hockey, what would have been a 1-goal defeat becomes a 2-goal defeat, as the other team scores in the empty net, often from distance.

I guess the nearest we have in football is a tactical change to put more forwards on in the closing stages chasing a 1-goal deficit, but it is not quite as risky (goalkeeper stays in) and not quite as beneficial in terms of numbers (it's still 10 v 10 on the pitch).  Of course, the goalkeeper may come up for a corner in the closing stages and be caught out, not making it back to his goal in time, but he is not really in play in the same way - he is just a target for the corner rather than a super dribbler/passer of the ball who is taking part constructively in the attack.
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Joined: July 4th, 2011, 6:46 am

February 11th, 2018, 6:28 am #25

From what I've noticed the last week or so, it seems as though the fly keeper will still be one of the furthest players back a lot of the time (to either dash back to goal or to tag in the regular keeper on the sidelines). And whatever the risks it worked for Portugal last night* (their fly was furthest forward and assisted the equaliser).

They do seem to do it a bit early for the risk involved but if you're losing then why not roll the dice, I'd assume coaches at the top level of this sport have a lot of practice in knowing when the right time to go for it is anyway.

Also for what it's worth it seems easier to sucker-punch an empty net in ice hockey, I'm saying that purely off my experience on the NHL games where I'd be winning by one goal in the last minute, let the opponent into my half so they'd feel comfortable pulling the goalie, then wait to block/steal and score once I got in range of the goal. This tactic backfired way less than it probably should've done.



* = Side observation on that match - Portugal's captain and contender for world's best player goes down injured in the Final and his team scores a winner in extra time without him for their first-ever major trophy, for which injured captain is given the armband back after the match so he can hobble up to lift it. If we want to go further down the rabbit hole both of their names start with 'R' and end in 'o'...
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Joined: April 7th, 2007, 12:28 pm

February 11th, 2018, 6:35 pm #26

Booo.   It seemed to me that both goalkeepers were rubbish at actually saving shots, though maybe that is not an important aspect in futsal.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

February 12th, 2018, 2:29 pm #27

Talking about famous goalkeepers, I'm not sure, but I suspect Peter Shilton inspired the name of India's midfielder Shilton D'Silva.
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Joined: February 9th, 2011, 2:58 pm

February 16th, 2018, 3:43 pm #28

A fresh one. A couple of weeks ago, Osvaldo Ardiles Haay appeared for Indonesia versus Iceland.
I don't know if he's a "Bicicleta" specialist though...
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