The "Random ____ fact" topic

Joined: 1:02 AM - Jun 19, 2013

2:20 AM - Jun 20, 2013 #1

Fact: I am bringing this topic over!
Fact 2: Happy fact telling everyone :D
Arcadia hereto serve my Luca-sama!

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Joined: 9:55 PM - Jun 18, 2013

2:20 AM - Jun 22, 2013 #2

Fact: So far all attempts to stop the ants have failed.
Fact 2: I guess tomorrow is going to get interesting *sigh*
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Joined: 2:36 AM - Jun 18, 2013

2:34 AM - Jun 22, 2013 #3

Fact: Tomorrow I'll make rice pudding!

People are paid to do Lolita Sonwellia's dirty work.~♥
Thanks iruje for the sprite and Geiky for making it into an avie.
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Joined: 2:06 AM - Jun 18, 2013

2:31 AM - Jun 23, 2013 #4

Since this is the Random ____ fact topic...

Random Greenlandic Language Fact: In Greenlandic orthography, the lengths of certain consonants may be expressed as follows, where X is the consonant.

Default length: X
Twice default length: XX
Four times default length: rX

So for example, the consonant "p" expressed by itself is of default length. If it appears as "pp," the length is twice as long as if it were just "p." If it's "rp," the length is four times as long as "p" or twice as long as "pp."


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Joined: 7:03 AM - Jun 19, 2013

4:08 PM - Jun 23, 2013 #5

Fact: I have two luggages in my room waiting to be filled yet I've been roaming around the internet for the whole day today.
Fact 2: I haven't even find a place to stay.


Fact 3: I is doomed.
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Joined: 2:06 AM - Jun 18, 2013

8:03 PM - Jun 24, 2013 #6

Random Hmong Language Fact: Hmong is a tonal language, like Thai, Chinese languages, Vietnamese, Twi, Yoruba, and other languages. This means that words in Hmong may sound the same and differ only in what pitch is used to say the word. Because of this, tonal languages are often said to be musical in quality. Because of this tonal identity, and because Hmong has many tones, a sentence like this can pop up:

"Pov pom pov pog pov pob pos los-poj?"

In this sentence, all the words except for "los" are pronounced "po." The letters at the end signify what pitch should be used when pronouncing the word. It means "Pao saw Pao's grandmother throw a thorny ball, right?" and to the untrained ear would sound like "Po po po po po po po lo po?"


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Joined: 4:29 PM - Jun 19, 2013

9:01 PM - Jun 24, 2013 #7

Fact: Something GOOD finally happened to me.
Fact: Every year has been terrible since 2010.
Was quel ra rre ganna sphilar na handeres art na apea
Ma num ga wearequewie netvear den na netvear art erlla melenas has
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Joined: 9:55 PM - Jun 18, 2013

12:08 AM - Jun 25, 2013 #8

Fact: There has been way too much chaos this past week.
Fact 2: Some of it got settled over the weekend, but the bulk of it still carries on.
Aurica Nestmile's #1 fan!
The Thunder of Arcadia Army Creed
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Joined: 2:36 AM - Jun 18, 2013

4:08 PM - Jun 25, 2013 #9

Fact: A male dolphin will sometimes "copulate" with another's dolphin (regardless of male or female) breathing orifice. This makes the dolphin the only known animal to engage nasal sex.

People are paid to do Lolita Sonwellia's dirty work.~♥
Thanks iruje for the sprite and Geiky for making it into an avie.
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Joined: 2:06 AM - Jun 18, 2013

5:56 AM - Jun 26, 2013 #10

Random Korean and Japanese Language Fact: China, and as a result the Chinese language, has played a major part in Korean and Japanese history, so much so that many Korean and Japanese words are derived from Chinese, and Chinese characters are usable if one desires in Korean and almost obligatory in certain contexts in Japanese.

A distinct difference, however, between how Korean and Japanese uses Chinese characters, which are called "hanja" in Korean and "kanji" in Japanese, is what is allowed to be written in hanja/kanji should one desire to use it. Because of the Chinese influence, the bulk of Korean vocabulary can be divided into "native Korean" and "Sino-Korean" vocabulary, and likewise, the bulk of Japanese vocabulary can be divided into "native Japanese" and "Sino-Japanese" vocabulary. "Sino-" is a prefix which refers to China or Chinese stuff.

Whether a word is native Korean or Sino-Korean is the dividing line for whether it can be written in hanja or not. This distinction doesn't seem to exist in Japanese. In Korean, all hanja have a reading which is in some way derived from the Chinese, while in Japanese, kanji have a reading based on the native word to which the kanji has been attached as well as a reading that's derived from the Chinese.

To demonstrate this more concretely, we'll take the word for "sea" in both languages. In Japanese, the native Japanese word is "umi," and in Korean, the native Korean word is "bada." In Chinese, the word is "hai," which was inherited by Japanese as "kai" and Korean as "hae."

The word for navy in Sino-Japanese is "kaigun," which is written 海軍 and literally means "sea army." As discussed earlier, "kai" is derived from Chinese "hai;" "gun" is derived from Chinese "jun." So in Japanese, "haijun" becomes "kaigun." In Sino-Korean, the word is "haegun," which can be written 海軍 in hanja or 해군 in hangeul. Overall, we can see that the words are related because of their Chinese origin: haijun, kaigun, haegun.

If we take "sea" by itself, which is "hai" in Chinese, in Japanese it's "umi," which can be written as うみ but should be written as 海. On the other hand, if we take the Korean word "bada," if an overly ambitious learner of hanja writes "bada" as 海, he is mistaken, as hanja are never used to write native Korean words. Instead, he must use the hangeul form 바다. The reason native Korean words are given in hanja dictionaries is not to present an alternative reading to the hanja, but rather simply to define them using a native Korean word.

In other words, 海 may be read "umi" or "kai" in Japanese depending on its context. However, because hanja are only used to write Sino-Korean words in Korean, 海 must always be read "hae" and not "bada," as whenever it may be found, it will always be part of a Sino-Korean compound.


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