Ok, next question

Ok, next question

TWrelated
TWrelated

March 16th, 2004, 2:49 pm #1

Say at some point in the future science has evolved to a point where they are ready to try reanimating human suspensions.

Like any new scientific endevor, there will be a bit of trial and error before acheiving success, leaving behind an unsuccessful string of botched reanimations.

How is the scientific community going to chose from this pool of potential cantidates?

"TW, hero: we'll save him for when we know what we're doing."

"JHW: well..."

"Walt Disney: Early freeze, probably won't work."

"Joe Blow, average unknown citizen? There you go, who's he? Good! Let's start with that one."

What is the heierarchy for reanimation going to be?

Personally, I'd prefer to wait until they have the process down, but do you have that option?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 16th, 2004, 3:01 pm #2

...that tells us what's happening in terms of molecular motion for every extra degree of temperature added. If something isn't quite right, we can lower the temp again until even a more futuristic technology can deal with the glitch. Later, with new molecular tools, we can try again. If a glitch is found at a particular level of motion (heat), then it's back down once again, and so on.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 16th, 2004, 5:22 pm #3

Who donated their bodies to science (and rather than winding up in a forensic science "graveyard" rotting with maggots and all sorts of other horrors, they get a shot at actually coming back from the dead).
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Maniac
Maniac

March 16th, 2004, 5:35 pm #4

...that tells us what's happening in terms of molecular motion for every extra degree of temperature added. If something isn't quite right, we can lower the temp again until even a more futuristic technology can deal with the glitch. Later, with new molecular tools, we can try again. If a glitch is found at a particular level of motion (heat), then it's back down once again, and so on.
Similuations that would seem totally crazy, given today's technology, but that should be no problem in the future.
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Non E. Moose
Non E. Moose

March 16th, 2004, 8:04 pm #5

Say at some point in the future science has evolved to a point where they are ready to try reanimating human suspensions.

Like any new scientific endevor, there will be a bit of trial and error before acheiving success, leaving behind an unsuccessful string of botched reanimations.

How is the scientific community going to chose from this pool of potential cantidates?

"TW, hero: we'll save him for when we know what we're doing."

"JHW: well..."

"Walt Disney: Early freeze, probably won't work."

"Joe Blow, average unknown citizen? There you go, who's he? Good! Let's start with that one."

What is the heierarchy for reanimation going to be?

Personally, I'd prefer to wait until they have the process down, but do you have that option?
I believe the cryonics organizations all have as part of the signup process, a document you can complete recording your preferences regarding the circumstances under which you wish to be reanimated. Of course, future generations have no more of an obligation to honor that then they do to reanimate you at all, but there is at least some chance that you will get your druthers.

If I am mistaken about one or two organizations who may not have such a document, they should have.

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j.t. searcy
j.t. searcy

March 16th, 2004, 9:07 pm #6

Say at some point in the future science has evolved to a point where they are ready to try reanimating human suspensions.

Like any new scientific endevor, there will be a bit of trial and error before acheiving success, leaving behind an unsuccessful string of botched reanimations.

How is the scientific community going to chose from this pool of potential cantidates?

"TW, hero: we'll save him for when we know what we're doing."

"JHW: well..."

"Walt Disney: Early freeze, probably won't work."

"Joe Blow, average unknown citizen? There you go, who's he? Good! Let's start with that one."

What is the heierarchy for reanimation going to be?

Personally, I'd prefer to wait until they have the process down, but do you have that option?
I sure hope this is not how selection is done. I hope they map each brain before attempting recovery. By knowing the level of damage, they will be in a better position to evaluate recovery schemes.

I also hope some entity (Alcor or its successor) is in charge of these people and strongly refuse to tamper with anyone of their PAYING customers until as much is known about the individuals condition as possible. To just blindly 'rush in where fools dare not tread' would be grossly irresponsible.
J.T.
P.S. I seriously doubt that in an age when people remain permanetly healthy and youthful, with space travel available to all, that T.W. will have the value he does today.
J.T.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 16th, 2004, 9:18 pm #7

...are kind of not even relevant. I think Iain Banks' world is the kind of world humans are heading for. Waking up in such a future would be absolutely fantastic.
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Nother Moose
Nother Moose

March 17th, 2004, 3:53 am #8

Say at some point in the future science has evolved to a point where they are ready to try reanimating human suspensions.

Like any new scientific endevor, there will be a bit of trial and error before acheiving success, leaving behind an unsuccessful string of botched reanimations.

How is the scientific community going to chose from this pool of potential cantidates?

"TW, hero: we'll save him for when we know what we're doing."

"JHW: well..."

"Walt Disney: Early freeze, probably won't work."

"Joe Blow, average unknown citizen? There you go, who's he? Good! Let's start with that one."

What is the heierarchy for reanimation going to be?

Personally, I'd prefer to wait until they have the process down, but do you have that option?
If the world is a good place, the revivals will not occur by lottery or fame or any other capricious method. I see those people being revived in order of damage done.

We already know death is bad; things die and deteriorate. If cryopreservation techniques continue to improve though and the structure really is stored, then it will eventually become easier and easier to reverse the process with no additional damage. The people revived first will be the people who were preserved using the most current, documented, and proven techniques. Fortunately, perfect preservation is something that should help the entire transplant world, not just cryonicists, because a lot of lives could be saved if you could actually store organs for more than 48 hours and get them to people in need. It's worthy research and should be done; but perfect preservation isn't the whole of the equation, only part of it.

For cryonics to work as advertised, there also has to be a cure for whatever killed the person in the first place. Cancer, aids, old age, all of these would need to be cured before someone is revived, otherwise, what would be the point if someone woke to only die again quickly? It's likely to be a last-in and first-out sort of thing, barring unexpected things like murder that cause more damage.

I think it's the combination of the two that really make people nervous, and that's why you often hear time frames of 100 or 200 years. It could be much sooner than that, if the world continues to work on things like computing power, killing cancer, and all the nano stuff that will be needed to save the most highly damaged people. There's no question a lot more work is needed before that first revival is even attempted.

...still a skeptic, after a long time.

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