How many last minute case requests were there in 1st Qtr. 2004?

How many last minute case requests were there in 1st Qtr. 2004?

Rick on (((LAST MINUTE CASES)))
Rick on (((LAST MINUTE CASES)))

April 22nd, 2004, 3:15 pm #1

Tanya says that there were more last minute case requests in the first quarter this year than she expected. This may indicate a trend or not but it's certainly a phenomenon that keeps popping up that I'm amazed by. Who makes the calls for last minute preservations? And why? And do the requesters sign up themselves since they obviously think cryonics has value for whoever they're calling for? Tanya says she actually put the extra document online to increase the ability of a person to make the request for cryonics easier than the standard paperwork BECAUSE of this large number of last minute requests from people OTHER than the dying person! (I think I've got that right, but maybe not). [+]

I've heard from authoritative people in Alcor that last minute cases can be very good, financially, too. This must figure into the analysis of this last-minute phenomenon. It's certainly a whole different "branch" of cryonics, from a market point of view, than what the rest of us are familiar with. Most of us sign up years in advance and have all our paperwork done and argue a lot. These last minute cases should be studied in detail and we should start by logging every call-- and reporting it in a journal-- so that we have an idea as to what types of people are calling these things in. Stranger things in this world I've not seen-- than the last minute request from relatives for a preservation. I do not "get it". You would think that the relative calling it it would sign up, themselves, in advance, if they believe cryonics is a good failsafe. Do they? Does Alcor try to sell the relative? "Hey", they could say, "it's too late for your mom or dad (or whoever), but what about you?".
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Photon
Photon

April 27th, 2004, 4:59 am #2

People that are near death often request a priest. These last minute request are similar. Maybe cryo people should roam the hallways of hospitals.

Photon
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Joined: April 19th, 2004, 8:15 pm

April 27th, 2004, 1:29 pm #3

bad reputation. You are asking for some SERIOUS negative PR if you have 'deathbed chasers'.
Last edited by Lloyd_Arising on April 27th, 2004, 5:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Photon
Photon

April 28th, 2004, 3:29 am #4

Priest and churches have done it for hundreds of years with big success. It is how you do it. This is the problem with people in cryonics. They just don't understand marketing
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Joined: April 25th, 2004, 11:50 pm

April 28th, 2004, 11:57 am #5

... had volunteers, maybe representatives of the Venturists, offer free bedside or grief counseling. But Lloyd is right, this is tricky, especially since cryonics involves money. Many cryonicists could be seen as 'affiliated' with a provider, and accused of getting kickbacks.

You're right that cryonicists often don't seem to understand marketing, but I think many also underestimate how offensive the idea of cryonics is to most people.
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Joined: April 19th, 2004, 8:15 pm

April 28th, 2004, 3:24 pm #6

Priest and churches have done it for hundreds of years with big success. It is how you do it. This is the problem with people in cryonics. They just don't understand marketing
And certainly the idea of marketing is not something that has passed over the heads of cryonics leaders and members over the years. I think it might even be a recurring theme, if you scour through the archives. But the problem of finding a consisently workable and palatable technique has never been solved. I remember reading some cryonet posts about trying to do recruitment at sci-fi conventions—having a booth or walking around and talking to people. I think that was tried and it met with lukewarm results. How about exhibits at science fairs, maybe?.....if they would let you in.

Now, hospitals. I guess they are fairly receptive to a cryonics presence when it is the result of pre-signup by the patient. But if you do something that could be viewed as recruitment (asking them to let you have a presence there when there is no signed up patient, or relatives who contacted you), I think hospitals would be extremely resistant. It might not hurt to try. But I don’t think most hospitals would not even want you to leave cryonics “flyers” or ads on their premises, let alone have a representative physically present. That’s just my intuition. And of course my experience is mostly on the periphery, both of medicine and of cryonics. You would hope that institutions with some connection to science might be open to cryonics. But then you would think that about cryobiologists, too. In reality, my hunch is that hospitals are so concerned with PR and negative imagery (especially in this age when they have become so image-conscious and mindful of litigation problems), that they would only consider the lowest common denominator: The reaction of patients and family members who would be extremely turned off, even appalled, by a cryonics presence in their institution.

Last edited by Lloyd_Arising on April 28th, 2004, 5:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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