looking for advice on job hunting

looking for advice on job hunting

ErickSinda
ErickSinda

June 26th, 2002, 1:19 am #1

So I've decided that I need a new job. I've never been that happy at my current job, but I figured it was a good place to be for a recent college grad and would look good on my resume (my company does sensor development and data analysis, mostly for the government). Unfortunately, it reminds me too much of the movie Office Space. We even have a guy at the company named Michael Bolton, I sh*t you not. Time for me to leave.

I've got a few friends in good places, so if push comes to shove I'm not really worried about finding something, but I really want to learn how to find new jobs. I've tried doing half-hearted searches on the web, and I've used HotJobs and Monster.com before, but I haven't found anything exciting.

Is there a good way to go out and find companies I'm interested in? I'm not necessarily looking for job listings (although if anyone has recommendations I'd love to hear them) so much as company listings. I just don't know the best way to go about looking, and I end up getting frustrated, which makes me procrastinate. I'd appreciate any advice ya'll could give.

Erick.

p.s. I'll definitely be around for Seven Samurai this Sunday, btw.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 4:29 pm

June 26th, 2002, 1:29 am #2

Job Fair

Always a good place to start looking. Always the first place I send people.
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ErickSinda
ErickSinda

June 26th, 2002, 1:36 am #3

I'd been meaning to check them out, but it always slips my mind unless I'm listening to a commercial for one. Since I haven't turned my car radio on in two months or so... yeah. Thanks for reminding me, I'll check for one right away.

I am looking for jobs in areas other than where I'm living though. I live in Ann Arbor, MI., but I could move either back to the DC area, NYC area, or somewhere in CA. Suggestions? If it helps, I'm looking for a computer programming intensive job.

Erick.
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Joined: March 5th, 2001, 7:01 pm

June 26th, 2002, 1:50 am #4

So I've decided that I need a new job. I've never been that happy at my current job, but I figured it was a good place to be for a recent college grad and would look good on my resume (my company does sensor development and data analysis, mostly for the government). Unfortunately, it reminds me too much of the movie Office Space. We even have a guy at the company named Michael Bolton, I sh*t you not. Time for me to leave.

I've got a few friends in good places, so if push comes to shove I'm not really worried about finding something, but I really want to learn how to find new jobs. I've tried doing half-hearted searches on the web, and I've used HotJobs and Monster.com before, but I haven't found anything exciting.

Is there a good way to go out and find companies I'm interested in? I'm not necessarily looking for job listings (although if anyone has recommendations I'd love to hear them) so much as company listings. I just don't know the best way to go about looking, and I end up getting frustrated, which makes me procrastinate. I'd appreciate any advice ya'll could give.

Erick.

p.s. I'll definitely be around for Seven Samurai this Sunday, btw.
Hi,

And give you one word: network.

Not that thing with wires and such, but your friends, their friends, their friends etc. To all "six degrees of separation".

get on the horn, call everybody you know. Tell them you're in the market and do they know of anyone who might know of . . . Then call the names they give you.

No good job is ever advertised in the paper

--Pete
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Charis
Charis

June 26th, 2002, 7:17 pm #5

Afraid so! As much as I don't "like" that answer, that
skills and such should play a much larger role than who you know, it's so very true. 8-\

As I reflect back on jobs, co-workers, and employees, it's stunnning: 100% of great jobs taken were un-announced, known-via-friends ones, a total of about 225 resume send-outs over a span of fours years (at different points in my career) led to zilch, despite ability in the job requirements that can be described in no words less than stellar. On the flip side, employees who were personally vouched for, never had a dud, while taking unsolicited folks, about 50% so-so, 30% flat out dud, 20% good.

Push as hard as you can with contacts who respect you, to ask around and/or push you as hard as they can comfortably do.

Job fairs are a good start, and you might get a great starting position offer from it, but... in reality job fairs are used by 'top' places only when they've run out of contacts and have to go scraping. 8-\

Pursue both, but don't neglect networking!!

Good luck,
Charis
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Drasca
Drasca

June 27th, 2002, 5:00 am #6

As a young'un undergrad I'm feeling pressured to investigate and join Fraternities too-- and the main advantage I can see is networking. Hmmph... I'll stick to the blind optimism that ability and character will win out in the end--at least for now.

It helps I tend to make friends with professors and one parent is in the field I study... but, I, the young'un, will stick to the blindly optimistic belief I'll get a job by merit--and "ok." (I doubt anyone here would like to shoot me down on this belief, but gah... Reality seems terrible, I want to work around standard granted procedure or twist it to my making...)


-Drasca,
the guy twisting his face from what he suspected was true, but refuses to play networking as higher priority...
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Charis
Charis

June 27th, 2002, 7:02 am #7

Yes and no...

Believe me I hate networking, and I'm very poor at it. I'm just saying that it nevertheless had a big impact on which doors opened and which did not. That's not to say that merit wasn't important. It was vital. The key events I mentioned would never have worked if not for merit. And after the post, I did remember that scholarships along the way were 100% merit, 0% contacts.

So by all means, keep optimistic and hopeful! But while you're at it... don't neglect the importance of contacts. Actually, being an anti-networker myself, I'm not into the six degree thing and don't "work" that well. For example, given the utility of extra studying and doing a little better, or spending time partying with those with low ambitions (depends on the frat of course) in the name of networking, I would chose the former. In my own experience, the "first degree" contacts are the ones that by far matter the most, with second degree making a difference at times, and have never seen higher lvl ones pan out.

Charis
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Charis
Charis

June 27th, 2002, 7:05 am #8

As a young'un undergrad I'm feeling pressured to investigate and join Fraternities too-- and the main advantage I can see is networking. Hmmph... I'll stick to the blind optimism that ability and character will win out in the end--at least for now.

It helps I tend to make friends with professors and one parent is in the field I study... but, I, the young'un, will stick to the blindly optimistic belief I'll get a job by merit--and "ok." (I doubt anyone here would like to shoot me down on this belief, but gah... Reality seems terrible, I want to work around standard granted procedure or twist it to my making...)


-Drasca,
the guy twisting his face from what he suspected was true, but refuses to play networking as higher priority...
Yes and no...

Believe me I hate networking, and I'm very poor at it. I'm just saying that it nevertheless had a big impact on which doors opened and which did not. That's not to say that merit wasn't important. It was vital. The key events I mentioned would never have worked if not for merit. And after the post, I did remember that scholarships along the way were 100% merit, 0% contacts.

So by all means, keep optimistic and hopeful! But while you're at it... don't neglect the importance of contacts. Actually, being an anti-networker myself, I'm not into the six degree thing and don't "work" that well. For example, given the utility of extra studying and doing a little better, or spending time partying with those with low ambitions (depends on the frat of course) in the name of networking, I would chose the former. In my own experience, the "first degree" contacts are the ones that by far matter the most, with second degree making a difference at times, and have never seen higher lvl ones pan out.

Charis
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Joined: November 21st, 2001, 1:08 pm

June 27th, 2002, 12:38 pm #9

As a young'un undergrad I'm feeling pressured to investigate and join Fraternities too-- and the main advantage I can see is networking. Hmmph... I'll stick to the blind optimism that ability and character will win out in the end--at least for now.

It helps I tend to make friends with professors and one parent is in the field I study... but, I, the young'un, will stick to the blindly optimistic belief I'll get a job by merit--and "ok." (I doubt anyone here would like to shoot me down on this belief, but gah... Reality seems terrible, I want to work around standard granted procedure or twist it to my making...)


-Drasca,
the guy twisting his face from what he suspected was true, but refuses to play networking as higher priority...
One of my university history professors used to quote John Graves Simcoe (one of the first Governor Generals of Canada, before it was Canada): "It doesn't matter what you know, it is who you know."

It upset me at the time. I was sure the world ought to be fair enough that I should be able to get by on my own merits. (I also completely lacked any kind of personal contacts for what I wanted to pursue at the time.)

But, unfortunately, it is all too true. Your light can shine very brightly, but it might as well be under the proverbial bushel basket if you don't have contacts. So work them. You may get the job through contacts, but you still will have to keep it by your own work. And that will lead to the next one(s).

Best wishes.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 4:29 pm

June 27th, 2002, 3:10 pm #10

I must say one little thing.

The best job is the one where you are your own boss.

Networking is good, it can help out an awful lot. No doubting that.

However, there is a certain satisfaction in pounding the pavement and wearing in your sneakers. Finding a good job is a lot of work, luck, and effort.

The hunt is the best part.
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