Hey Doc...

Hey Doc...

Lissa
Lissa

September 16th, 2003, 3:43 am #1

You in the way of Isabel? Been seeing lots in the news about the outer banks having an evacuation order being put in place tomorrow and with the last cat 5 huricane going a ways inland, wondering if you've been getting prepared.
Quote
Share

Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 4:29 pm

September 16th, 2003, 4:36 am #2

I survived Jerry and a few others that whompled the inlands and the foothills. This one will probably be pretty nasty, but I got enough food and water for better then a year stashed away. Genny is working again, and I have around a dozen cords of firewood for the wood burning stove. (One for cooking... Has a great oven for baking bread.)

My only concern with all the rain... Is snakes. LOTS of snakes. Miss Cleo predicts many serpents in my future. Even my magic eight ball on my computer says "With out a doubt, yes." My home is sitting on a rise, so no concerns about flooding, but there is some low lands down by the pond and the creek basins. Just worried about snakes... Lots of snakes. Wife's sister, husband, and my Goddaughter will prolly be coming to stay with us if it hits directly, as they always get flooded if it rains more then 2 inches. Jerry dropped something like 18 inches of rain IIRC. I live right next to the mountains so storms always stall right over head and stay for days. My new home is actually in a better location stormwise then my old home. Much higher ground where the house sits. Nearly a 20 foot or so rise, over a nice gradual slope.

My only worry is high winds. The house is made from brick and logs, but the barn could see some damage.
Quote
Like
Share

Sirian
Sirian

September 16th, 2003, 6:07 am #3

...according to the latest projections, I'M in the path of the storm, almost directly. Western PA is quite a bit inland, and no way we'll take the brunt, but unless she swerves, could still be a 'cane when she gets here. Now that's something.

We'll know more tomorrow. She could also still possibly swerve out to sea, though the forecasts say that's not likely any more. We are finally learning enough to have SOME degree of sense about what these tempests are up to and why they behave as they do.


- Sirian
Quote
Share

Joined: November 21st, 2001, 1:08 pm

September 16th, 2003, 11:57 am #4

Toronto too is in the currently projected line of the storm.

One report I heard gave a range of 2-10 inches of rain here on Friday.

Hurricane Hazel hit here in 1954, and caused an amazing amount of damage - most of the lives lost were due to disbelief about the flooding potential. Eight inches of rain fell in one day on a city already waterlogged.

http://www.disastershq.com/features/hazel.asp

The good news is that those streets on the creek and river floodplains here were never permitted to be re-built. And, of course, as Sirian pointed out, we can be fore-warned of the arrival.

The bad news is that there are a lot more of us here now. And some of the most vulnerable of us are on those floodplains still - the homeless who camp illegally in the parks there.

Best wishes to both of you. May the serpents not invade your Eden, Doc.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 4:29 pm

September 16th, 2003, 12:51 pm #5

You in the way of Isabel? Been seeing lots in the news about the outer banks having an evacuation order being put in place tomorrow and with the last cat 5 huricane going a ways inland, wondering if you've been getting prepared.
I will only catch the outer edge. Although you never know. Prediction is spotty at best.

Good luck you folks up North. Keep on flyin, keep on tryin for higher ground
Quote
Like
Share

Occhi
Occhi

September 16th, 2003, 2:06 pm #6

...according to the latest projections, I'M in the path of the storm, almost directly. Western PA is quite a bit inland, and no way we'll take the brunt, but unless she swerves, could still be a 'cane when she gets here. Now that's something.

We'll know more tomorrow. She could also still possibly swerve out to sea, though the forecasts say that's not likely any more. We are finally learning enough to have SOME degree of sense about what these tempests are up to and why they behave as they do.


- Sirian
You might want to keep your eyes peeled for Tornadoes associated with cyclonic activity. A few days after we left CT there were three Tornadoes spotted in the wake of some big storms, an area I would not have guessed was prone to funnel clouds.

In flat old Sould Texas, tornadoes are frequently spotted near Hurricaines as they run inland. When Gilbert passed by here in 88, mostly hitting Matamoros, Mexico, San Antonio had half a dozen or so funnel clouds touch down in their area. San Antonio is a good solid 100 miles inland.

At least your local reservoirs should fill up when Isabel passes through, on the bright side.

Best of luck, we have already dodged a few down here this summer, and are waiting for the infamous "third cold front" from Canada to end our Hurricaine Season.

Shadow, is there anyone up there I can email to get that next nice blast of good, cold, clean Canadian air down here?
Quote
Share

Ozymandous
Ozymandous

September 16th, 2003, 3:03 pm #7

Toronto too is in the currently projected line of the storm.

One report I heard gave a range of 2-10 inches of rain here on Friday.

Hurricane Hazel hit here in 1954, and caused an amazing amount of damage - most of the lives lost were due to disbelief about the flooding potential. Eight inches of rain fell in one day on a city already waterlogged.

http://www.disastershq.com/features/hazel.asp

The good news is that those streets on the creek and river floodplains here were never permitted to be re-built. And, of course, as Sirian pointed out, we can be fore-warned of the arrival.

The bad news is that there are a lot more of us here now. And some of the most vulnerable of us are on those floodplains still - the homeless who camp illegally in the parks there.

Best wishes to both of you. May the serpents not invade your Eden, Doc.
Some of the "snow birds" that plague Florida will get some of that Florida weather they usually miss when they go back home to the North.

Heh, 'nice' to see another part of the country experience the wonder and beauty of nature. Of course you'll have to look fast to enjoy the nature since it's a tad hard to see when it blows by at 100+ m.p.h.!
Quote
Share

Zed
Zed

September 16th, 2003, 3:05 pm #8

Toronto too is in the currently projected line of the storm.

One report I heard gave a range of 2-10 inches of rain here on Friday.

Hurricane Hazel hit here in 1954, and caused an amazing amount of damage - most of the lives lost were due to disbelief about the flooding potential. Eight inches of rain fell in one day on a city already waterlogged.

http://www.disastershq.com/features/hazel.asp

The good news is that those streets on the creek and river floodplains here were never permitted to be re-built. And, of course, as Sirian pointed out, we can be fore-warned of the arrival.

The bad news is that there are a lot more of us here now. And some of the most vulnerable of us are on those floodplains still - the homeless who camp illegally in the parks there.

Best wishes to both of you. May the serpents not invade your Eden, Doc.
could see some wet stuff here as well.
Quote
Share

Joined: November 21st, 2001, 1:08 pm

September 16th, 2003, 4:40 pm #9

Some of the "snow birds" that plague Florida will get some of that Florida weather they usually miss when they go back home to the North.

Heh, 'nice' to see another part of the country experience the wonder and beauty of nature. Of course you'll have to look fast to enjoy the nature since it's a tad hard to see when it blows by at 100+ m.p.h.!
My mother and step-father are two of those snowbirds.

However, they always wait until December 1st to leave, until the lake freezes over and they cannot pump water from the lake anymore.

Of course they are entirely a different breed of snowbird from your usual type. They go wilderness camping for their annual visits (who knew there was wilderness in Florida? :P). Thus their contribution to the Florida economy is minimal, albeit invisible and thus possibly less annoying to most Floridians.
Quote
Like
Share

Lissa
Lissa

September 16th, 2003, 5:47 pm #10

...it's the fact that they cause problems with traffic and take up relaxation time that people that are not retired trying to use (like going out to dinner on a Friday night or the weekend). They seem to think that because they are retired that they are owed by everyone else and that their time is more important that people still working and trying to make a living.

Even my father, who's less than 3 years away from retirement, despises the snow birds.

Some of the problems they cause is they drive during rush hour time frames (7 am to 9 am and 4 pm to 6 pm) when they could a much broader time span to drive and not effect people trying to get to work or home from work (driving between 9 am and 4 pm for example). Instead of choosing a night where resturants have a number of open tables, they choose the nights where working people are actually going out to wind down from the week.

You Mother and Step-Father would be a blessing to those of us in Arizona cause they actually stay out of the way of those that are not retired. Convince them to come to Arizona some time...
Quote
Share