What is an "allotment " ?

wannabegardener
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11:05 PM - Sep 01, 2003 #1

Not sure as to which forum to post but as I think it pertains to gardening chose this one.
I hear talk and see mention but what exactly is it ?Theresa
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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Laura Penstemon
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11:15 PM - Sep 01, 2003 #2

Hee Hee I guess this is a very English thing. An allotment is a piece of land which is divided into sections, each one of which is calld an allotment. Each piece is 'alloted' to someone.
They are usually used by people to grow fruit and veg, and to escape to when family life is too much.
They are quite an institution in tis country and people are very passionate about them.
Hope this helps.
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wannabegardener
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3:12 AM - Sep 02, 2003 #3

Do you have to apply for it ?
We have community gardens that pop up from time to time - Usually on vacant lots where houses have been torn down or in this one small town I used to live , we did that in the public park .A lot of the Catholic churches still do the community garden .Theresa
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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Laurel360
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7:29 AM - Sep 02, 2003 #4

Wanna
I would image that the origins of Allotments are practically feudal! Haven't had time this morning to do any proper research but they certainly came into their own during the last war (probably WW1 too). The "Dig for Victory" campaign when everyone was encouraged to grow vegetables in whatever space they had. The local Councils made land available split up into sections based on the old rod and perch measurements.
Water is usually supplied to butts or, if you're lucky, cisterns - even luckier if like me you get the use of a hosepipe!
I have a smaller than average plot on some church land near my house and thoroughly enjoy it - especially as I have only a tiny back yard at home.
Traditionally, they are first and foremost for fruit and vegetables but most people grow at least some flowers, either for cutting or companion planting - or just to make it look nice.
I shall be self-sufficient in potatoes and onions this year and currently have gluts of courgettes and tomatoes; the french and runner beans haven't been too good this year for me though. Various cabbages, cauliflowers and broccoli coming on - and other stuff I can't remember at the moment.
I see that Eb has an allotment - sure he'll fill you in on the technicalities!
Basically it can be hard work - but tremendously rewarding, and let's not forget good old FUN!!!

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Ebbassman
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8:33 AM - Sep 02, 2003 #5

An allotment is a bit like painting the forth bridge, ... by the time you start weeding at one end, the weeds at the other end shoot up and laugh at you.
seriously though ... I don,t know the law regarding the allocation of allotments but i believe that by law the town council has to provide land for individuals to grow fruit & veg or flowers. The allocated land is run by a comittee of allotment holders and a small rent is paid each year to the town council. On my allotments, we are allowed to put up sheds and greenhouses and grow anything you want for your own family and friends but you are not allowed to grow for profit by selling your produce.
I grow fruit that we can eat or make wine with, ... or veg for the table, ... and my favourite flowers, chrysanthemums.
If you require any other info, just ask!
Eb brassband bass players are soooo sexy
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wannabegardener
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12:44 PM - Sep 02, 2003 #6

Very interesting.
Thanks Eb and Laurel , I understand now . Theresa
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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Beaver97
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12:59 PM - Sep 03, 2003 #7

What an interesting thread!
I've never given any thought to allotments before now. I suppose because I was never into gardening until very recently (considering my advancing years ).
I have seen a few TV progs recently covering allotments. They seem to have started during Victorian times, but came into there own during WWII.
During the last few years I've had the opportunity to visit a few allotment sites in our area. What a suprise! It's amazing what is being grown, how good the products are AND how many "home-from-home" creature comforts are added by the users.
The closest to me, in Greenmoor Road for those of you who know where I am, have a few vacancies if your interested....
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wannabegardener
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1:09 PM - Sep 03, 2003 #8

Would have been a bit of a necessity I would say during WWII.
I wonder if there is something on the net about the history ... I'll have to go look
History is my other interest Theresa
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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scotia10
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2:42 PM - Sep 03, 2003 #9

For those that are interested the National Allotment Association is at;
www.nsalg.demon.co.uk/Scotia
http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk
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wannabegardener
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3:53 PM - Sep 03, 2003 #10

Thanks , Scotia - marked it in my favs to read later .Theresa
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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geo2
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9:30 PM - Sep 05, 2003 #11

Scotia , nice pics, see you have greenhouses on your allotments, you are very lucky, where my allotment is thee council does not allow this not even allowed to put a small shed up to keep tools etc in. The price of our allotments are going to cost us between 35 & 40 per year next year, our council do nothing to help us ,no security , think they are trying to get rid of us but they will have a fight on there hands
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LynneBee
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9:51 PM - Sep 05, 2003 #12

This site is a potted history of the allotment the interesting bit is in the 1800's
Fear of peasant revolt lead to to the General Inclosure Act.
Inclosure commissioners empowered to authorise enclosures
only on condition that land was set aside for allotment use.
Provided the first confirmation of the basic concept of the present allotment movement.
www.kitchengardens.dial.p...istory.htm
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Flowerofshona
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8:38 AM - Sep 06, 2003 #13

Geo i know what you mean about the prices going up i think the council would like to get there hands onto the land to build on but as it is fully let they would have a hard job as we will all fight.
We have 82 plots on our site and a long waiting list some of the guys have had there plots 30 years plus !!!
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scotia10
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11:14 AM - Sep 06, 2003 #14

Ours cost 12 per annum standard, 6 for pensioners.
The build up is 6 for allotment and 6 for water supply, the pensioners pay only for the water as this is a seperate company, so basically they get them free from the council.

Scotiahttp://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk
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tracey auburn
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11:45 AM - Sep 06, 2003 #15

Never realised how lucky i am with my plot till i read your stories,i pay 12.00 for plot included use of water,shed,we have on site toilets and the use of a freight container to store our more expensive tools in,it also houses the rotavator and motorised truck that we all have use of . The only things we are lacking is a 12ft boudary fence to keep out yobs and a clubhouse with bar,but we are working on it.
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Flowerofshona
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11:54 AM - Sep 06, 2003 #16

wow you lot get off light we pay 25.50 for 10 rods we can have sheds greenhouses chickens ect we have built our own site shop (very nice one to ) but no loos so its bucket and chuck it
We where going to go self management but decided not to as we would have come responsable for the large amount of old and dying oak trees on the boundary which could have bankrupted the association and we worked hard to get the funds we have now, up to two weeks ago i ran the shop and built it up so that we have 3,000 of stock and money in the bank.
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4:53 PM - Sep 06, 2003 #17

Wanna that cleared up your enquiry...I would so love an allotment
Louisa

If at first you don't succeed ~ destroy all evidence that you tried.
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