Rust

wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Joined: 10:30 PM - May 23, 2003

12:50 AM - May 01, 2004 #1

I am noticing it appearing on my Lilacs and my Phlox .Anything I can do to stop it ?
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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kitty58
Champion Tree
Champion Tree
kitty58
Champion Tree
Champion Tree
Joined: 11:51 PM - Apr 08, 2003

6:48 AM - May 01, 2004 #2

Sorry Wanna......I don't know, but I bet there is a wo/man who does...

Kitty



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Plantsman64
Flowering Annual
Flowering Annual
Plantsman64
Flowering Annual
Flowering Annual
Joined: 5:52 PM - Jan 05, 2004

10:46 AM - May 01, 2004 #3

Theresa - if it is true rust (produces brown to orange pustules) and not Lilac blight, you are lucky and a suitable fungicide should clear it up after removing infected leaves. I can't recommend a fungicide, not knowing what is available to you. Infection at this time is often seen after a mild wet autumn and will be aided by a wet spring.
Lilac blight initially produces irregularly edged brown spots on the leaves and progresses to infect and blacken buds and stems. Pruning out and burning infected parts is the answer.
Phlox is very susceptible to powdery mildew which is a white powdery growth mainly on the upper side of the leaves. Again, a fungicide needs to be applied. There are environmental friendly remedies that are said to be effective by some - diluted milk sprayed on is said to help but I don't know how well it will work for you. A warm damp atmosphere is often the precursor of this disease.
Phlox can also suffer from fungal and bacterial. The bacterial leaf spots sometimes surrounded by a bright yellow edging. It does not produce raised fruiting bodies as in a fungal disease. I would remove and burn infected leaves.
Fungal leaf spot is not specific to Phlox and can be caused by numerous fungal organisms. Spots, usually grey to brown and seen on the leaves and my progress together to form large necrotic areas. Remove infected leaves and apply a fungicide.
Fungal diseases are spread in via water droplets, surface water or air flow. Worst infections occur during a warm, wet periods.Peter
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wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Joined: 10:30 PM - May 23, 2003

1:34 PM - May 01, 2004 #4

Which is exactly the Spring we are having now - very warm and very wet . That explains it.
I've printed your response ,Peter .After I get coffee ,I'm headed back out to see whether blight or rust .
The Phlox is mainly affected just on the very bottom leaves - those closest to the ground , holding the moisture. I'll prick them off , burn , wash hands and see if that doesn't clear it up .
I saw a recipe for a preventive spray the other day - I'll start it on my roses , see what is available at Lowe's and use it on the affected plants .
Is it fatal ? Either blight or rust?
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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Plantsman64
Flowering Annual
Flowering Annual
Plantsman64
Flowering Annual
Flowering Annual
Joined: 5:52 PM - Jan 05, 2004

2:30 PM - May 01, 2004 #5

Rust is not generally fatal if you remove effected leaves and spray with a fungicide. Blight! - now you bring another condition into the conversation I will need to have more details. As far as I know, you don't get blight on any plants you have mentioned.Peter
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wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
wannabegardener
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Joined: 10:30 PM - May 23, 2003

4:05 PM - May 01, 2004 #6

When it quits ,I'll post a pic so you can see
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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