Quick growing conifers

A hedge is a fence formed by a row of closely-planted shrubs.

Quick growing conifers

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12 Feb 2004, 11:15 #1

but how quick can I expect them too grow - I mean will I wake up tomorrow to find they have grown to 17 foot or are we looking at years?
We URGENTLY need privacy by the summer but does it mean a fence is the only answer?
Louisa
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PaulineM
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12 Feb 2004, 11:54 #2

Argh! (shudder) think carefully before you do it, Louisa! Like how big is your garden? Because Leylandii, to name the favourite for the purpose, has tremendous girth as well as height, and sucks an awful lot of moisture and everything else from your soil.
Privacy for the summer, you say? So why not go for a mixture of tall-growing flowering shrubs like buddleia, garrya elliptica, lilac, and others that slip my mind at the moment.
Just how tall do you want them?
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12 Feb 2004, 12:54 #3

Pauline,
This is for privacy in the back 'the mud garden' so very little will grow - if they take moisture that will do for me.
There are very few plants that will grow, even bog plants fail because it's all mud and clay.
Louisa
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PaulineM
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12 Feb 2004, 16:13 #4

Sounds like my garden, Louisa - but I still wouldn't fill it with Leylandii.
Have just remembered that in his programme on hedges a while back Chris Beardshaw recommended a good substitute for Leylandii that didn't have its evil habits. Wonder if it's on the Beeb Web site?
Ha! Found it! Thuja plicata 'Atrovirens' (Western red cedar) - have a look here:
BBC - hedges
Apparently you can cut it back and it will grow, unlike Leylandii which gives you big brown patches if you cut back too far.
I don't know how either of them feel about mud, though!
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scotia10
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12 Feb 2004, 16:34 #5

I am going to agree and disagree with you Pauline.
I agree if you cut back a badly maintained leylandii hedge you will get brown patches, however if you trim a hedge annualy from the outset then you can control the height, width & colour.
Like you I am not sure about the water.
Then there is always 'Willow' (Salix) fast growing, doesn't mind a bit of damp, but once it gets going it like Leylandii it wants annual trimming.
http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk
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wannabegardener
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12 Feb 2004, 16:55 #6

Salix alba ssp. vitellina 'Britzensis' has gorgeous red bark in the winter - loves moisture , fast grower. Cut back to 15" in late winter.
The only downside to either willows or buddleia is they are deciduous .Privacy lost in winter..
Both though would do very well in clay and wet soil .Sun is more an issue than soil or moisture.
I've seen a few of the Thuja- there's a hybrid cultivar in Wayside called Thuja 'Green Giant' - cross between the Western Red Cedar and the Thuja Standishii - grows 3' to 5' per year , to 50' in height , 7 to 8 ' wide.Very tolerant of most any soil and never needs pruning for shape .
Resistent to pests and diseases , resistent to snow and ice damage - natural conical form.
For an evergreen , I can't see where any would make a better choice unless the height is an issue.
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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PaulineM
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12 Feb 2004, 17:15 #7

Of course you are right, Scotia - I think perhaps I've just suffered a bit too much from enormous inherited leylandii hedges in the gardens of rented houses - not so much neglected as planted and abandoned - and once that's happened there's nothing you can do! So I hate them with a deadly loathing! When we finally went looking for a house to buy I crossed one straight off my list when I saw them in the garden!
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kitty58
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12 Feb 2004, 17:53 #8

I grew a lly...how do you spell it ...hedge in my last garden to hide the car port. My neighbour also has one to sepeate the garden from the veg area. Both have grown well BUT as Scotia says they need to be managed from the start. That means trimming and clipping with as much love as any other plant

Kitty



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macywack
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12 Feb 2004, 19:03 #9

think the short answer louisa is , nothing is that quick, no instant hedge, and also a 6' to 7' conifer is gonna set you back 20 to 25 each
macy
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OldJake1
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12 Feb 2004, 19:20 #10

Scotia's mention of Willow reminds of a tale way back in the 60s when someone I knew who used withes for staking his new planted saplings.
The saplings died and he was left with rooted withes stakes.
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salli c
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12 Feb 2004, 19:49 #11

Now there's an idea Louisa. How about a screen of living willow? That would be interesting, quick growing and happy in mud.


xx-Sal-xx





xx-Sal-xx
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PauleneS
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12 Feb 2004, 19:53 #12

Sounds like you have cracked it there.... and if theres any left over, Lou can build a 'living wigwam' for the girls.
Well done OJ and Salli
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jo m 1
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12 Feb 2004, 23:15 #13

what about a laurel hedge?
we have one that was dreadfully neglected when we moved in - hacked it right back & now it's away Good, solid, evergreen & MUCH nicer than those leylandii monstrosities
jo
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12 Feb 2004, 23:44 #14

We have planted 9 conifers today in beween the hawthorns.
We needed an evergreen that wasn't picky about where it grew.
I love willow and we will be having it if we stay here.....but let us get through this summer first.

Louisa
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MadgeUK
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15 Feb 2004, 13:47 #15

I think it now has to be borne in mind that there will be legislation on the statute book this year (2004) to curb the growing of leylandii as boundary hedges and that they cannot be more than 2m high
freespace.virgin.net/clar...yGuide.htm
Many people let leylandii get out of hand through laziness, illness, old age etc., and as they do grow very quickly, there is always a risk that you could fall foul of the legislation and be sued.
Also, willow/salix need to be well away from your house as they have long root runs, seeking water, and can undermine foundations very easily.
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pipnsox
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15 Feb 2004, 14:00 #16

I think 2 metres is a good height and as much as anyone would reasonably want.
It's interesting that this only applies to evergreen hedges. I have a lilac tree at the end of my garden that I only keep there to screen me from the flats behind and that is definately over 2 metres and the screening is successful in winter because of the density of the branches.
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