Plugs and Hanging Baskets

kitty58
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kitty58
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4:41 PM - Mar 26, 2004 #1

Now before I get my knuckles rapped, Scotia I have been to your site and looked under B. Plantsman I have lost the www for your site.
The plug plants that came earlier all look quite large and healthy to me...They were from T&M incase anyone else has them Fushias and Petunias..... Can I plant them straight into the basket...which will be kept in the greenhouse OR should I pot them on first

Kitty



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scotia10
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5:24 PM - Mar 26, 2004 #2

I'm guessing you have mini-plugs i.e. about 1/2" square/round.

If this is the case then pot them up into 2" pots or cells, and grow them on.
If you have maxi-plugs,i.e. about 1" square/round you might get away with putting them in your baskets, providing you keep the basket frost free until all fear of frosts are past.
Personally I would pot them all up into 2"/3" pots and grow them on in a frost free spot until mid/end of April.
If space is at a premium grow them on in trays/boxes about 2" apart. You should get about 15 in a standard tray.
I hope this helps you to make your mind up!


http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk
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Plantsman64
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6:21 PM - Mar 26, 2004 #3

Kitty, your loss of my website URL is completely my fault as I have removed it to break it up and remove all page to page links. I want to use it in a different way now as separate self
contained items with their own address.

Hanging Baskets
I would add to scotias good advice by saying that I would be inclined to insert into the basket now. Especially those that are to be inserted into the face. I have always preferred to get my annual plants into the basket as small as possible and grow on as you suggest before placing outside. Those for the top can be larger and more mature as they will in part be composted of potted subjects.Peter
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salli c
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7:19 PM - Mar 26, 2004 #4

I agree, get them in the baskets while they're small. It's upsetting to have to damage the root system by trying to force them thru the gaps once they've grown bigger.


xx-Sal-xx





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kitty58
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12:05 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #5


They are 1 inch plugs

Kitty



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scotia10
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12:40 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #6

I will try and clarify what I was meaning Kitty.
I see where Peter & Sal are going with what they say, and they have valid points.
What was in my mind is..........choose whether you put them into the baskets now or later, they will require protection from the weather, and I find it is easier to store & harden off a trayful of pots than say half a dozen baskets.
This opinion is based on my growing methods so it is very much a personal choice thing.
Put simply.... I haven't the space to store full hanging baskets so I do things to suit my needs.
As I think all will agree 'gardening' is not an exact science so the 'end result' may be arrived at in many ways, I was relating mine, as I am sure Peter and Sal were theirs.
And for general interest I do not push the 'rootball' through the basket, I push the 'plant top' through. So you see again.......the end result is the same but got at in a different way.
p.s. Having seen the size of your plants I would pot them up for two reasons........
1) there will be a fair bit of weight on the plant if placed through the side of the basket so this may cause damage and at worst knock the top off.
2) This is the greedy part of me talking....by growing them on to a larger size I would then tip them out when placing them in the basket a) to make them bushier, and b) to increase my stock, i.e. I would root the 'tips'
Funny thing is gardening


http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk
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Plantsman64
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1:18 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #7

Yes, either way, scotia. As you say, if depends upon facilities and usual practices. Looking at the picture of the plug plant I would be happy to install that directly into the basket, providing, as you say, there is hanging or standing space to grow them on until hardening off time. I do tend to advise on the assumption that all facilities are available, and this comes from having produced hundreds of baskets for municipal display where I had to make an early start to reach the required number. Hanging space was no problem. Regarding the insertion of plants through the wire mesh (if that is the type of basket used) different plants require different methods. Most I would be quite happy to insert foliage first from the inside as I built up the layers; others, because of the nature of the foliage I would insert root first from the outside.
Out of interest - some of my favourite displays have been the use of a single species of plant in numbers. Expensive, unless you are producing your own plants, but to me a basket solely made up of Impatiens or Campanula isophylla gives a very attractive display. Achimenes, if one is required for the warm to hot house.
Kitty, you go along with scotia's advice if you don't have space for growing on baskets made up now. Keep them at around 60F with a night time temp. of not less than 45F and growing steadily until hardening off time, be they in baskets or pots.Peter
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kitty58
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2:56 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #8

Decisions...decisions but I'm grown up now and will decide

Yep thats the answer .....I'm going to do both.
P.S Thanks for the advice xxxx

Kitty



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salli c
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4:29 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #9

I agree Peter. More than one way to skin a rabbit

xx-Sal-xx





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Plantsman64
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4:45 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #10

You know Sal, It's years since I had rabbit pie. When I was a boy Dad used to bring them home regularly from the shop (he was a butcher). Tender rabbit, crisp pastry - yum yum.Peter
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kitty58
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5:08 PM - Mar 27, 2004 #11

Ages since I've had it too yum-yum

Kitty



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salli c
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8:33 AM - Mar 28, 2004 #12

I've never tasted rabbit. Not sure I would these days cos I only really eat chicken and bacon meat-wise. Must've been nice to have the fresh meat brought home from the butchers

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jo m 1
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11:15 AM - Mar 29, 2004 #13

rabbits?
come & sit in my garden - pick your own!
jo
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jasmine
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4:53 PM - Mar 30, 2004 #14

Brilliant advice. Thanks everyone.
Jasmine x
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macywack
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6:34 PM - Mar 30, 2004 #15

Yes my mum used to do a rabbits stew, yummmm
macy
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