Orange tree in Spain.

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9:46 PM - Apr 05, 2004 #1

Hi,I planted an orange tree last year next to a lemon tree.The orange tree has gradually lost most of its leaves after turning a pale green.It is however in bloom with a continual stream of ants climbing the trunk to the blooms.
The lemon tree is 2 yards away, in full bloom and showing lots of new leaf growth.
Any ideas on how to irradicate the ants?
Will the tree reproduce leaves?
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wannabegardener
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10:30 PM - Apr 05, 2004 #2

Gavin and
Not sure about the foliage but Diazinon works well on eliminating ants .I have used the granule form before - just sprinkle and water in if I remember correctly .
The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
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LynneBee
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4:28 AM - Apr 06, 2004 #3

Are the ants natures way of pollanating? Not sure about Spanish nature.
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PaulineM
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7:29 AM - Apr 06, 2004 #4

Hi there. I know nothing about Mediterranean-climate gardening, but I'm planning to learn! Meanwhile could you give us a little more information - like how big was the tree when you planted it, and was it container-grown?
The leaf loss could be simply to the shock of being transplanted, in which case keep your fingers crossed for recovery!
About the ants - for all I know Lynne is right. But I recall many of the trees I've seen in Greece having the bottom metre or two of the trunk painted white. I don't think this is a local style of ornament - I think it's to stop something getting up the trunk and into the tree. It might be worth asking some of the locals for advice.
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Rich
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11:59 AM - Apr 06, 2004 #5

Ants often farm aphids to get the sap from them.
I stopped ants climbing my trees by putting grease bands around them. The grease in a tub soon hardens off and the ants walk over it, so I find it better to use the sticky paper type.
You are what you drink, and I'm a bitter man.





There 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't.
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LynneBee
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5:48 PM - Apr 06, 2004 #6

This is an intersting article about ants in china on citrus trees
www.blauen-institut.ch/Tx...tm315.html

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PaulineM
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6:13 PM - Apr 06, 2004 #7

Very interesting, Lynne.
By the way, don't laugh at the mediaeval farmers - there is still a marked tendency (especially among businessmen and civil servants) to believe that you eradicate a disease simply by legislating against it!
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LynneBee
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6:21 PM - Apr 06, 2004 #8

I never laugh at lease old techniques they worked then they should work now
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PaulineM
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6:32 PM - Apr 06, 2004 #9

OK, have just had a quick trawl around Google, and if you do a search on 'citrus problems' there's an awful lot there.
This might interest you:
Q.&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp Most of the Leaves on My Young Citrus Tree Are Yellowing and Dropping. Why?
A.&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp Foot Rot disease may be the problem. This fungal disease attacks the tree at or just below ground level, rotting through the bark and conducting tissue thereby stopping the flow of water and nutrients in the tree. It is aggravated by planting citrus too deep (the top of the root ball should be flush with the soil surface), mulching citrus (an excellent idea on every other plant, but not citrus) poor drainage (citrus likes very well drained soils) or overwatering (citrus will thrive on an inch of water (or less) a week. Yellowing veins is a typical symptom of foot root or root rot disease.
Link: edis.ifas.ufl.edu/CH087
But there might not be a problem at all - see here:
Yellow Citrus leaves in Winter usually not a disease symptom
In general there seem to be a lot of dire warnings against planting citrus too deeply and not having sufficient drainage.

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