July still ok to plant Bare Root roses?

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July still ok to plant Bare Root roses?

Kotsos_Garden
Seedling
Seedling
Joined: June 8th, 2018, 3:05 pm

July 10th, 2018, 8:56 am #1

Hello all!

Did a similar post with dahlias and begonias.

Should i still plant the bare root roses if the order arrives within July or is the timing ridiculous as they should be pruned again for winter before even having a chance? (...and therefore i should sent it directly back if it arrives since they were  two months late with no excuse)
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petemz
Seedling
Seedling
petemz
Seedling
Seedling
Joined: November 20th, 2017, 3:36 pm

July 10th, 2018, 11:49 am #2

Hi Kotsos,
It's still ok to plant bare root rose now, providing the plant is in good health; i.e. there's no dieback and the roots and stems are ok.
The roots should feel soft and pliable to the touch, and the stems should be firm and spring back when squeezed.
There should be no light green soft growth on the plant either.
Roses don't need to be pruned in there first year, unless it gets a dead snag at the top or near the top of any of the stems, then just prune below the problem area and it will be ok.
I hope this helps.
Kind regards 
Peter. 
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Taffy
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Taffy
Herbaceous Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Joined: September 15th, 2014, 7:18 pm

July 10th, 2018, 12:25 pm #3

First thing to do is to soak the roots for an hour or two before planting, then plant and make sure you keep them well watered in this drought.
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kitty58
Champion Tree
Champion Tree
kitty58
Champion Tree
Champion Tree
Joined: April 8th, 2003, 11:51 pm

July 11th, 2018, 8:30 am #4

Kotsos, where did you order from? Most reputable companies, like David Austen, won't deliver until Now and you will get full instructions. If it does arrive I'd be tempted to give them a ring and see about a return. As said above you can still plant if you want to but it's not the optimum time as roses are best moved during dormancy



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Kotsos_Garden
Seedling
Seedling
Joined: June 8th, 2018, 3:05 pm

July 11th, 2018, 10:04 pm #5

Hello and thank you so much for your responses,

Peter all this information is really valuable on how to know the bare root health, thanks for sharing it. Didnt know that about the no pruning for first year good to hear that as well.  
But i assume thats only for freshly planted bare roots. So if i get grown roses from David Austen for example they would require pruning when time comes? Peter on your experience when its the best time to get and plant bare roots? October-November when they enter dormancy as Kitty suggested?


Taffy, yes, from what i understand its essential to soak the roots in every case, it sure helped the magnolia to establish seemlessly i think.


An update is unfortunately the seller lied that the courier himself returned the second order or something, they have totally lost the plot. I will tell the name so that no more people have go through what i go, it was Gardening Express. no words, any appopriate description doesnt suit our good forum.Too sad i have read reviews only once i have place the ordered...lesson learned the hard way and an empty garden (but i make sure my wild flowers are thriving hahhahaahh)

So it seems i will instead go as i should have after properly searching with a reputable seller and perhaps start with 1-2 grown Roses. (i like scented roses am targeting Lady Emma Hamilton and Munstead Wood from David Austin, goot to hear you agree for their quality. Hope these varieties are ok for beginners (with a lot of passion hahaha)
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kitty58
Champion Tree
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kitty58
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Joined: April 8th, 2003, 11:51 pm

July 12th, 2018, 8:27 am #6

 I've bought roses from David Austen and find them great to deal with. My friend bought me 'The Generous Gardener' She wasn't happy with what they sent so complained and they sent her another, telling her to keep the first one so now we both have one. Oh, and the first one was as good as those I see in some garden centres. By the way it is a beautifully scented climber.



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petemz
Seedling
Seedling
petemz
Seedling
Seedling
Joined: November 20th, 2017, 3:36 pm

July 12th, 2018, 4:12 pm #7

Hi Kotsos,
October, november time is a good time to buy bare root roses, ( As Kitty suggested. ) plant them in a hole that is larger than the width and depth of the roots and fill with some compost, surrounding the roots as this will help the plant to survive the winter. If you have clay soil, the compost will be much warmer than the clay.
You can also buy roses for planting in early spring, March / April. In both early winter and early spring plant the roses before any signs of frost.
If you are a beginner at growing roses, then the best thing to do, is maybe go to the garden centre and ask them to recommend varieties that are easy to grow.
most Hybrid Tea roses are easy to grow, and are fragrant.
" Mr Lincoln " is a very good rose for scent. Red colour
" Fragrant cloud " is also very good. Red colour.
" Queen Elizabeth " is slightly scented, and is a Floribunda rose, pink or red varieties.
" Arthur Bell " is very fragrant and is also a floribunda rose. Yellow in colour.
Container roses are also a good buy, and are easy to grow, but require a different planting method.
Firstly dig a hole slightly deeper, and wider than the container, ( Leave the rose in the container at this stage. )
If you have clay soil then break up the sides of the hole and the bottom, as this will help the water drain away much easier.
( Roses don't like standing in water. ) Then put compost in the bottom of the hole, then placing the container in the hole with the rose still in it, fill the hole around the container with compost, pressing it down so as to leave no air pockets. Then lift the container out of the hole with the rose still in it. Then carefully lift the rose out of the container, place the rose with the soil that is surrounding the roots, ( being careful not to disturb the root ball, as roses don't like root disturbance. ) into the hole left by the container, and fill in any gaps around the roots and press firmly down, then water the plant.
Hope this will help.
Kind regards.
Peter.   
 
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