Hedge Problems

Maxlass
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Maxlass
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Joined: February 18th, 2018, 10:19 am

February 22nd, 2018, 3:37 am #1

I have a couple of problems with my hedge. In one spot it just doesn't seem to want to grow and is very pale and when I pruned yesterday there was a couple of dead branches in different spots that I had to cut out. Does anyone know what may be the cause? On another section that is not as established I get new shoots that go curly and it is stunting the growth. After they go curly I notice what ever it is attacks ants. I have had a close look and can't see any insects but I don't really know what I'm looking for. The photos of these don't really show much as I took them after I pruned so a lot of the affected shoots were cut off.

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C.A.
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Joined: September 22nd, 2002, 2:21 am

February 22nd, 2018, 9:19 am #2

I can't personally help you, but hopefully someone will be along soon who can. I just wanted to welcome you to our Forum.
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Jane_T
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Joined: January 14th, 2003, 4:31 pm

February 22nd, 2018, 9:33 am #3

Welcome to RG.   I am sure there will be some other more experienced gardeners along in a minute,  but in the mean time

Is your hedge Choisya ternata, or another evergreen? 

Have you fed your hedge lately?  

Do you know how old the plants are?
Jane

"Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad."
rjt.org.uk
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kitty58
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Joined: April 8th, 2003, 11:51 pm

February 22nd, 2018, 3:47 pm #4

Hi firstly 
leaves.gif

Sorry, thought I'd posted this first thing this morning, must have forgotten to hit the submit box. I'm no expert on hedges but is that privet? If so it may be honey fungus certainly the symptoms match. If it is there is not a lot you can do bet remove and burn the infected plants Look it up on the web, THS might be a good place to start.



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Maxlass
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Joined: February 18th, 2018, 10:19 am

February 22nd, 2018, 4:53 pm #5

Murraya paniculata is the breed and it is fed every two months with an organic chicken manure in pellet form. I'm guessing it is around 5 to 6 years old. It get watered approximately twice a week with a goof amount of water.

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Taffy
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Joined: September 15th, 2014, 7:18 pm

February 22nd, 2018, 11:32 pm #6

Interesting problem.
Firstly I presume you are in Australia or there about with Murraya paniculata as a hedge, here in the UK it's sometimes used as a rootstock for citrus but is not hardy over most of the UK so needs winter protection, so no good for a hedge.
Lets first look at the curly tips. I think you will fond that you have aphids in the new growth, that's what is bringing in the ants, they literally farm the aphids, they milk them for Honeydew, that's also what is causing the sooty look on some of the leaves. I did wonder if you might have had scale insects on the shoots but they should have shown up on your pic. If you have a household Fly spray containing  A pyrethroid
I'm sure I can see aphids in the pic. (I did copy it and blow it up a little).
aphids and ants.jpg
Now to the Die back. Like Kitty I do wonder if it is Phytophthora Dieback see ... https://www.dwg.org.au/what-is-phytophthora-dieback.
Other thoughts are to much chicken manure, esp if it was being put on fresh as it can be very toxic, but you said you use it pelleted. It could be that the feed is making the new growth soft so easier for pests to feed off. It could be that an established hedge could get by with just one feed  (early spring) a year.
I would be using a balanced, slow release fertilizer like https://www.bunnings.com.au/osmocote-50 ... r_p2961295
As long as you are giving it enough water after use, a hedge like that will use a LOT of water, it needs to be flooded to get the water down at least 12 inches to the roots, Preferably deeper than that as you want to get the roots to grow down deep and not grow towards the surface. You shouldn't need to water often but when you are watering a really good long soak is best.
Another thought though not really likely is a dog using one spot as a place to mark his territory.
One problem is that if it is phytophthora then the more you water the easier you make it for the fungus to spread.
Hope this is of some use.
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Maxlass
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Joined: February 18th, 2018, 10:19 am

February 25th, 2018, 6:09 am #7

Taffy wrote:Interesting problem.
Firstly I presume you are in Australia or there about with Murraya paniculata as a hedge, here in the UK it's sometimes used as a rootstock for citrus but is not hardy over most of the UK so needs winter protection, so no good for a hedge.
Lets first look at the curly tips. I think you will fond that you have aphids in the new growth, that's what is bringing in the ants, they literally farm the aphids, they milk them for Honeydew, that's also what is causing the sooty look on some of the leaves. I did wonder if you might have had scale insects on the shoots but they should have shown up on your pic. If you have a household Fly spray containing  A pyrethroid
I'm sure I can see aphids in the pic. (I did copy it and blow it up a little).
aphids and ants.jpg
Now to the Die back. Like Kitty I do wonder if it is Phytophthora Dieback see ... https://www.dwg.org.au/what-is-phytophthora-dieback.
Other thoughts are to much chicken manure, esp if it was being put on fresh as it can be very toxic, but you said you use it pelleted. It could be that the feed is making the new growth soft so easier for pests to feed off. It could be that an established hedge could get by with just one feed  (early spring) a year.
I would be using a balanced, slow release fertilizer like https://www.bunnings.com.au/osmocote-50 ... r_p2961295
As long as you are giving it enough water after use, a hedge like that will use a LOT of water, it needs to be flooded to get the water down at least 12 inches to the roots, Preferably deeper than that as you want to get the roots to grow down deep and not grow towards the surface. You shouldn't need to water often but when you are watering a really good long soak is best.
Another thought though not really likely is a dog using one spot as a place to mark his territory.
One problem is that if it is phytophthora then the more you water the easier you make it for the fungus to spread.
Hope this is of some use.
Thanks for the advice. I only water once or twice a week and as you suggested its a good soak rather than a quick water. I'll try the other fertilizer though and see if it helps.

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