PPC questions

PPC questions

Oklahoma cop
Oklahoma cop

February 21st, 2002, 5:06 am #1

I am currently trying to get ready for firearms instructor course, I must shoot a 540 or better to pass on the 60 round phase 5. I am having trouble, does a stock s$w mod 19 have enough inherent accuracy to keep everything in the 9 ring or not. The pistol is a 19-3 so I believe it was made in the 80's. It's got alot of rounds down the barrel. What do you guys think? I can turn 280+ front halfs the majority of the time, back half is where it goes bad.
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robin schp
robin schp

April 10th, 2002, 4:13 pm #2

a model 19 smith has all the accuracy one could need from a service revolver. with a four inch barrel it will shoot out to fifty yards at point of aim with very little bullet drop.
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Jim S.
Jim S.

May 4th, 2002, 8:41 am #3

I am currently trying to get ready for firearms instructor course, I must shoot a 540 or better to pass on the 60 round phase 5. I am having trouble, does a stock s$w mod 19 have enough inherent accuracy to keep everything in the 9 ring or not. The pistol is a 19-3 so I believe it was made in the 80's. It's got alot of rounds down the barrel. What do you guys think? I can turn 280+ front halfs the majority of the time, back half is where it goes bad.
I have not shot PPC in years (a little long in the tooth). When I competed, I alway competed in the Stock division. My sole modification was the addition of H&K grips to the pistol grip (I have rather large hands and long fingers).

Although I do not have experience w/ the Model 19, my revolver is a S&W Model 28 "Highway Patrolman". I believe that gun went out of production in the seventies. I bought mine in 1977 and I cannot imagine the number of rounds that have been pumped down that barrel. It still shoots good ten-ring groups.

I can only make two recommendations: More practice (sorry!) and take the gun to a good smith perhaps he can tune up the action.

Hope this helps some. All the best,

Jim S.
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Vince
Vince

May 8th, 2002, 3:09 pm #4

a model 19 smith has all the accuracy one could need from a service revolver. with a four inch barrel it will shoot out to fifty yards at point of aim with very little bullet drop.
Your model 19 is perfect. Alot of them are shot at the phase II class. Clean up the front half though, you've got to be in the 290s to be able to make the 540 easier.
A little word about practice. LIVE AT THE 50 YARD LINE! Once you can keep your shots in the 8 ring consistently from the 50, the 25 yard line is no problem. Don't worry about the 25, just practice the 50. The 50 can be a little intimidating, but the 540 is alot easier once you find your consistency.
Here's what I've seen while assisting at the school and training other officers for the school. Get as close to 300 as possible on the front half, and shoot the back half without any zingers(make all 24 rounds score). Then put all the last 6 in there, and you've got it licked. Generally, if you shoot 295 or above on the front half, and make every shot score on the back half, you're up over 550!
Don't worry as much about equipment and grips, as long as the speedloaders will not hang up on the grips. The secret is keeping the front sight in total focus, and squeezing the trigger while not disturbing the sight picture.

Good Luck
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Joined: August 28th, 2013, 9:41 pm

January 10th, 2014, 12:03 am #5

I have not shot PPC in years (a little long in the tooth). When I competed, I alway competed in the Stock division. My sole modification was the addition of H&K grips to the pistol grip (I have rather large hands and long fingers).

Although I do not have experience w/ the Model 19, my revolver is a S&W Model 28 "Highway Patrolman". I believe that gun went out of production in the seventies. I bought mine in 1977 and I cannot imagine the number of rounds that have been pumped down that barrel. It still shoots good ten-ring groups.

I can only make two recommendations: More practice (sorry!) and take the gun to a good smith perhaps he can tune up the action.

Hope this helps some. All the best,

Jim S.
Good info
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