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Combat 2.2

Owner
Awesomely Awesome
Owner
Awesomely Awesome
Joined: 1:44 PM - Jun 06, 2010

1:11 AM - Mar 10, 2011 #1

Table of Contents
Please use the Ctrl + F function to search for the particular section you are looking for. Search codes are listed alongside the name of each section.
[+] Table of Contents and Quick Find Codes
Pokémon Battling
(papow)

->a: Combat 2.2
(ouch)

->b: Types
(tipe)

->c: Moves
(swme)

--->c1. Priority Moves
(prty)

->d: HP
(hlth)

->e: Stamina
(enrg)

->f: Damage
(pwnt)

->g: Evasion and Accuracy
(ddge)

->h: Mega Evolution
(dglv)

->i: Advanced Techniques
(cpow)

->j: Weather Conditions
(wthr)
Pokémon Battling
(papow)
  • If you use a move on your opponent and they do not respond to it within forty eight hours of your posting, then the move is an automatic success. You may post exactly what the move does to their character and take another turn. After three of these autohits, you may declare yourself the winner of the battle.
  • If an opponent ignores your move, you may claim an autohit on them. Please be sure to post that they ignored your move and point out where.
  • Player vs. Player battles are not moderated. If you feel like your opponent is cheating, go to a Staff Member.
  • Every damaging attack that hits deals at least one point of damage regardless of defenses or variable damage calculation.
While Recreational battles follow whatever rules both Trainers agree on, Official Battles have a special set of rules to go by. Official Trainer Battles are fights that fall under the jurisdiction of the Official Pokémon League. All battles that they sponsor must follow these rules and failure to do so will result in an automatic loss in whomever breaks them. Official Trainer Battles include Gym battles, Elite Four/Champion battles, and Ranked battles. Recreational battles and other challenges do not have to follow these rules.
[+] Official Rules
  • No wager can be placed on an Official Battle meaning that nobody will win or lose money due to the outcome of the fight.
  • Other than Pokémon Held Items, the use of items is prohibited during the course of the battle. However, a Trainer is free to use them before or after a battle.
  • Only one Pokémon is allowed to actively participate in the battle. Of course, Double Battles are excluded from this rule, but such a condition must be stated clearly before the battle begins.
  • Trainers can not physically interfere with battles. Official Battles are meant to test a Trainers command over their team, not a Trainer’s physical abilities. Certain challenges can be exempt from this rule, but must be stated clearly before it begins.
  • Other Trainers not involved in the battle are not allowed to interfere. This is excluded in the event of a Double Battle. In such an event, each of the partnered Trainers must use only three of their own Pokémon. These rules must be clearly stated beforehand.
  • Pokémon may not under any circumstance attack a Trainer.
  • A Pokémon must perform at least one move before being allowed to switch out, save for participation in a Gym Battle, where switching entails forfeiting the current round. This is to prevent the constant switching of a Trainer’s Pokémon.
  • A Pokémon League Certified Judge must always be there to witness a battle. Judges are always stationed at Gyms, the Pokémon League, and Battle Centers.
Now there is no real good place to put this next set of information, so we're putting it here because lots of it is a result of combat...

When your Pokémon gains Experience, levels up, learns a new move or if you gain Pokémon for your party, Items for your Inventory, and pretty much any change to your Character Profile, you will need to fill out a Modification Request. So yeah that was a mouthful, but here's how it works. To request a modification to your Character Profile, go on over to the Profile Modification Forum and fill out the Modification Template. Once filled out, a Staff Member will look it over, then modify your Character Profile accordingly. Okay, next section!
Combat 2.2
(ouch)
This is our in depth combat system unlike any you will see on any other site.
[+] What makes it so special, you ask?
There are two types of Moves on Pokémon Voyage, One Slot and Two Slot Moves. In a turn, players have two "Move Slots" that they can fill out however they wish.

One Slot Moves include basic attacks, Buffs, and Debuffs. A player may use two One Slot Moves per turn, but there are a few restrictions.
  • The same move can not be slotted twice.
  • If two offensive Attacks are slotted, only one may be used for offense. The other shall be used for defense.
  • Two Buffs or Debuffs that boost or lower the same Stat can not be slotted.
    Example: Defense Curl and Bulk Up
  • Debuffs are considered as Attacks, so they cannot be used to proceed with another Attack. Buffs, on the other hand, can as they are used for defense/support.
Two Slot Moves include powerful Attacks, Healing Moves, Multi-Hit Attacks, One Hit KOs, Weather Changers, Status Changers, and other powerful techniques. These moves require the Pokémon's full focus and thus, they can only use one Two Slot Move and zero One Slot Moves. For information regarding charging and cool down turns for Two Slot Moves, please consult their entry in the MoveDex
  • Order: Normally within a turn, a defensive turn is taken before the offensive turn. This is because the Pokémon’s first move would be to Counter/Avoid/Take or otherwise manipulate the incoming attack. Afterward, the offensive turn is taken to launch an attack. There are some special cases, however, when a defensive turn can come after an offensive one, but in nearly all cases, this does not happen. Only the use of certain moves trigger this to happen.
  • Options: You don’t HAVE to take a Defensive turn or an Offensive one. One could choose to take an attack head on or not attack and only defend. It is up to the Trainer and how they battle. A Trainer cannot save Slots for use in the next turn. If no offensive action is taken by the opponent, there is no move to defend against.
  • Dodging: In order to preform a dodge, it is considered as a "One Slot" move. This prevents people from dodging and using two One Slot attacks after. This also avoids the possibility of being cheap by dodging and using a Two Slot move or a full turn count. Avoid attacks wisely. Certain attacks cannot be dodged, nor partially dodged via a graze. These attacks, however, can be blocked and intercepted
  • STAB: Same Type Attribute Bonuses do apply to moves on both Slots. If two Pokémon at the same level and same power use Water Gun, the one that is a natural water type will overpowered the non-water type because of STAB. This also includes the changing from physical to special or vice versa via STAB as mentioned in the Rules. STAB will be added first before applying Weakness/Resistance multipliers. (The only time STAB does not apply is when used by Pokémon under level ten).
  • Items: Items used by Trainers take a whole turn to use. However, an item held by a Pokémon only takes up a single Slot. In this way, it forces careful item usage and more strategy for Trainers. Keep note that when posting on the use of the Item, we expect some creativity out of it.
  • Switching: Switching Pokémon takes up a full turn. This means they are left defenseless to whatever attack they switch in to and cannot perform a defensive move. Furthermore, since they did not perform an attack, there is nothing for the opposing Pokémon to defend against.
    Special Note: If Pursuit is used by someone after a person has switched Pokémon, it will take a full turn as well. But if it is used before (i.e. the Trainer predicted the switch), it will not. This is more a measure to balance Pursuit as it is an iffy move.
Types
(tipe)
Types are an important aspect of Pokémon. Every Pokémon and every Move has a type to it, one of seventeen, each with its own strengths and weaknesses.
[+] More Info About Types:
A Pokémon has up to two Types, depending on species, and gains all of the weaknesses and resistances of all applied Types. Unlike Pokémon, a Move can only have a single type, and it plays on the weaknesses and resistances of Pokémon that it is being directed at. As noted above, a Pokémon that uses an offensive Move of its type, it receives a boost in damage via STAB.

As a side note, if a Pokémon with two types, where one type has a weakness to a specific type, but its other type is strong against that same type that it is weak to, the weakness and strength cancels each other out and they take normal damage.

Below is a chart that logs the strengths and weaknesses of the different types
Moves
(swme)
In combat, a Pokémon is able to use techniques that form the core of a Pokémon's combat abilities.
[+] All About Innate and Learned Moves:
A Pokémon has two separate groups of Moves: Innate Moves, and Learned Moves. Innate Moves are learned naturally by the Pokémon and are listed in that Pokémon's PokéDex entry. Any given Pokémon will know every Innate Move listed as being learned at a Level equal to or below its own. Unless it evolves or somehow becomes unable to use an Innate Move, it will never forget it, and will always be able to use it.

A Learned Move, on the other hand, is one of three things:
  • A Move that was taught via a Technical Machine to the Pokémon
  • A Move taught to the Pokémon via other means, such as a Move Tutor.
  • An Egg Move obtained through breeding.
Learned Moves can not be obtained until a Pokémon is at least Level thirty, OR a Pokémon has leveled up at least ten times with its current Trainer. The only exceptions are Egg Moves and Moves learned through PTMs.

A Pokémon may know up to four Learned Moves. If the Pokémon learns a new Learned Move and already has four, it must forget a previous one in order to make room. Once forgotten, a Learned Move cannot be recovered without a Move Tutor so choose your moves wisely!

Please keep your Pokémon's Learned Moves in a list with that Pokémon's profile and statistics. Innate Moves... well, you should be able to figure that out just by looking at your Pokémon's PokéDex Entry and comparing its Level to the Learn Levels of the Innate Moves in its entry!

Okay, that was a LOT in information about Learned Moves and we understand that this concept can be a bit overwhelming for players not familiar with it. This section is going to go into detail about how Learned Moves can be... learned.
wrote:For all methods of obtaining Learned Moves, please consult the Generation V move lists on either Serebii or Bulbapedia.
TMs, HMs, and PTMs are the most common method of obtaining Learned Moves. Like the Generation IV games and prior, TMs can be used once while HMs and PTMs can be used indefinitely. While TM Moves can be overwritten with new ones, HM Moves can not. So please, use them with caution. To use a TM or an HM, place the disk on the Pokémon's head. From there, the information on it will transfer itself into the memory banks of the Pokémon. (Feel free to take creative license with this interpretation of teaching moves to your Pokémon. The above example is a rough outline of the most basic method. Remember, they ARE disks and can be used realistically as training videos or audioplays).

Note: HMs like Fly and Surf are taken literally in PV meaning a Pidgey can not carry a Trainer with fly and a Goldeen can not carry one with Surf.

PTMs are a Pokémon Voyage exclusive that stands for Penny Technical Machines. These are much cheaper than TMs and HMs, but the moves that they teach are much weaker. These include basic moves such as Tackle and Leer as well as basic elemental moves such as Ember and Water Gun. As mentioned above, PTMs are infinite use, but there are two conditions for using them.
  • With the exception of Normal-type PTMs, the Pokémon that is learning the move must have that element as their primary or secondary Type.
  • The recipient Pokémon must not be able to learn the move via level up.
The second most common method of obtaining Learned Moves is through the Move Tutor in Apel Town. By trading a Heart Scale, the Tutor is able to teach your Pokémon a move that it usually can not learn through TMs or by leveling up. Finally, you may obtain Learned Moves through breeding at the Daycare located at any town, please consult the Breeding System for more information.

Now that you know about Learned Moves, let's give you an example with this Tauros.
Example
Pokémon
HP and Stamina
Information
[/td]

LVL 5 Event Tauros
HP: 50/50

Stamina: 50/50
Gender: Male
Type:
Ability: Intimidate
Item: None
[/center][/center]
[+] Moves
1. Tackle
3. Tail Whip
5. Rage
8. Horn Attack
11. Scary Face
15. Pursuit
19. Rest
24. Payback
29. Cheer Up
[+] Learned Moves
-
-
-
-
As you can see, it knows nine Innate Moves, but no Learned Moves. Meet TM Stone Edge. By letting Tauros gain the knowledge off the disk, he has now obtained a Learned Move. Here is his new entry.
Snaproot City Event Pokémon
Pokémon
HP and Stamina
Information
[/td]

LVL 5 Event Tauros
HP: 50/50

Stamina: 50/50
Gender: Male
Type:
Ability: Intimidate
Item: None
[/center][/center]
[+] Moves
1. Tackle
3. Tail Whip
5. Rage
8. Horn Attack
11. Scary Face
15. Pursuit
19. Rest
24. Payback
29. Cheer Up
[+] Learned Moves
- Stone Edge
-
-
-
And there you have it.

Priority Moves

(prty)

Mix and match your strategy carefully - these new battle techniques will have you on your toes at all times.
[+] What's All the Fuss About?
PV is the number one site for in-depth battle strategy and immersion. And this section of Combat is no light matter. Lucky you, you'll always have this guide to refer to until you know these Priority Moves and how they affect your battles by heart.

To start things simple, Priorities have been split into five categories: Priority Attacks, Priority Buffs/DeBuffs, Priority Recovery Moves, Slow Priority Attacks, and Last Priority - each with their own special battle strategy. Updates to the MoveDex will happen periodically to reflect these changes - for now, please refer to the "Moves That Will Use This Format:" spoiler under every header.
Priority Attacks
  • Priority Attacks such as Quick Attack will cost twenty stamina to use.
  • Priority Attacks have reduced damage.
  • Priority Attacks can be used to intercept AND block. Exceptions will be listed in the Move Dex.
  • Priority Attacks have an added ability to decrease the accuracy of any move by fifteen percent
  • If both Pokémon use a Priority Attack, Speed Classes are used to determine who hits first. However, both Pokémon will sustain damage unless the quicker Pokémon faints the slower first or Sucker Punch is used.
  • Certain Priority moves can be used to Intercept and Block, however, the auto-hit Priority effect is terminated. Priority Moves follow the stamina deductions and Slot-changes of Blocks and Intercepts.
  • All Priority Attacks can be cancelled by Sucker Punch. The Pokémon whose attack is cancelled takes damage. If used to cancel a Priority, Sucker Punch costs ten stamina. A cancelled priority is a five stamina cost. Sucker Punch works as a normal priority when used against a normal move; that is, twenty Stamina, ten damage, with the auto hit clause.
  • Priority Attacks work only slightly differently in double battles - in the case of the Pokémon using a Priority on a foe that targets another Pokémon, the foe's attack is redirected to the Pokémon using the Priority. However, any attack that follows by another foe can still be dodged, intercepted, or blocked.
  • Status effects also become auto-hits with reduced accuracy in the case of priority use.
[+] Example of Quick Attack
Quick Attack: Physical, Two Slot| 10
Auto-hits before foe's attack. Foe's attack ALSO auto hits, unless attack is a selected 'special' priority attack like Sucker Punch, which cancels out Quick Attack and deals damage. (The cost is twenty stamina per use. Now called a "Priority" effect)
[+] Example of Sucker Punch
Liepard uses Sucker Punch. The cost is twenty stamina and the attack deals twenty damage.
Furret uses Quick Attack. The cost is twenty stamina, and the attack deals twenty damage.
Result: Too bad the Trainer thought Quick Attack would hit before Sucker Punch! Quick Attack is cancelled by Sucker Punch. Because of this, Liepard's stamina is reduced by ten only, and Furret's Quick Attack is cut short. Furret's stamina is reduced by five, and it takes twenty damage as a result.
[+] Example for Single Battles
Charmander uses Ember for thirteen damage.
Sentret uses Quick Attack for ten damage and at the cost of twenty stamina. It is an (Auto hit) move.

Results: Quick Attack hits Charmander. (There is a roll here now for the accuracy of Ember. The accuracy is cut by fifteen percent because of Quick Attack's alarming speed.)
Results: Sentret is too close to avoid Ember! Charmander is not fazed by Quick Attack! The attacks happen so close together, it is an auto hit for both!
Results: Subtract ten damage from Charmander and thirteen damage from Furret.
[+] Example for Double Battles
Post One (Player 1)
-------
Charmander targets Bulbasaur with Ember. pending
Squirtle targets Pikachu with Tackle. pending

Post Two (Player 2)
-------
Pikachu uses Quick Attack on Charmander. (Auto hit)
Immediate result: Because Pikachu used Quick Attack on Charmander, Charmander's Ember gets redirected from Bulbasaur to Pikachu with a fifteen percent deduction in accuracy. Damage is calculated if the attack lands, and is reflected in Player Two's Battle Summary. Because Quick Attack is a Two Slot move, the player will not be able to Dodge or otherwise manipulate Squirtle's Tackle. That damage is also calculated and described in the post if a teammate does not take the damage for Pikachu.
Bulbasaur takes Tackle for Pikachu at a cost of five stamina, and uses Vine Whip on Squirtle. pending

Result: Since Pikachu's Quick Attack is a priority, Charmander is hit with Quick Attack before all other attacks land. Because of the close proximity, Ember cannot be followed through to its original target, Bulbasaur. Ember, then, is re-directed to auto-hit on Pikachu because of this sudden close proximity.

Despite turn order, Ember's damage is also calculated with Quick Attack's because it is affected by the Priority of Quick Attack. The result is damage for both Pokémon. All other attacks require another turn to calculate damage after defensive action is taken.
[+] Example for Double Battles (2)
Post One (Player 1)
-------
Charmander targets Squirtle with Tackle. pending
Vulpix targets Starmie with Quick Attack. (Auto hit)

Post Two (Player 2)
-------
Immediate Result: Because Vulpix used Quick Attack on Starmie, Starmie's next attack gets redirected to Vulpix with a fifteen percent deduction in accuracy. Damage is calculated if the attack lands, and is reflected in Player Two's Battle Summary. Because Quick Attack is a Two Slot move, Player One gets the option to Dodge the next incoming attack during their next turn. All other attacks require another turn to calculate damage after defensive action is taken. So in short, Priority Attacks are calculated first, then the normal turn order resumes.

Result: Starmie cannot Dodge Quick Attack because of its Priority. Starmie uses Bubblebeam. Bubblebeam misses. Starmie takes damage, Vulpix does not. Damage is calculated and reflected in Player Two's Battle Summary. Turn order goes back to normal.

Squirtle dodges Charmander's attack and uses Water Gun on Vulpix. pending (End of Player Two's Turn)
[+] Moves that will use the Priority Attacks Format:
Progressive MoveDex: Priority Attacks
Move
Type
Slot Value
Power
Accuracy
Description
Fake Out
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
This move may interrupt Recovery Priority moves, cutting their effects by one-third. Damage is calculated normally afterwards. If Fake Out is used to cancel a Recovery Priority, Fake Out requires only five stamina to use. In any other circumstance, it costs twenty stamina to use this move.
Feint
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
Detect, Protect, Wide Guard and Quick Guard are destroyed. Damage is not calculated against Detect, Wide Guard, Protect or Quick Guard. This move costs twenty stamina to use.
Aqua Jet
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
This jet of water is launched at the opponent at an incredible speed, and it costs twenty stamina to use.
ExtremeSpeed
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user charges the foe at blinding speed, costing the user twenty stamina.
Bullet Punch
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user’s arms glow a bright orange as they dash at the foe, striking the target repeatedly with great speed, and costing the user twenty stamina.
Ice Shard
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user fires multiple small spikes of ice or one large one towards the target at lightning fast speeds, costing the user twenty stamina.
Mach Punch
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user dashes at the foe, delivering a swift punch and costing twenty stamina.
Shadow Sneak
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user's shadow stretches until it is behind the foe, then lashes out from underneath costing twenty stamina.
Sucker Punch
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
This move will always hit first, and cancel out other Priority Attacks and their effects. If the foe is not attacking and Sucker Punch is used, it will fail and five stamina will be deducted. Otherwise, it will cost twenty stamina.
Pursuit
Physical
Two Slot
10
100%
The user chases after a fleeing foe, using the victim's cowardice to its advantage. A fairly weak move at base, Pursuit deals double to an enemy that is running away or being switched out by its Trainer, costing twenty stamina to use no matter what.
Bide
Physical
Two Slot
Varies
-
The user endures attacks for two turns, then strikes with all their force, causing damage equivalent to double that they took. It costs twenty stamina to use. Bide cannot be used to Block or Intercept.
Priority Buffs/DeBuffs
  • Priority Buffs/DeBuffs can only be cancelled by Feint, which activates right after all Buffs and DeBuffs to break them. Feint causes damage only against select Buffs and DeBuffs.
  • Priority Buffs/DeBuffs always activate before Priority Attacks.
[+] Example
Ally Switch - DeBuff | Two Slot (switches place with an ally, switches foe's targets. Happens before all attacks, cannot be used to Dodge.) Normally, returning a Pokémon is a Two-Slot action that happens after moves - in PV, Ally Switch can be used in single battles to send out any other team member before the attacks land. In double battles, you can change positions only with another ally. Feint is capable of overwhelming Ally Switch. Turn order and Turn Order Conditions apply afterwards.
[+] Battle Example
Player One
--------
Kadabra uses Ally Switch
Kadabra prepares to switch out for Raichu. pending

Player Two
--------
Sharpedo uses Feint.
Immediate Result: Sharpedo breaks Buffs/DeBuffs and/or causes damage. In this case, Sharpedo causes damage after breaking Ally Switch. Kadabra remains on the field.

Results: Sharpedo breaks Kadabra's Ally Switch.
Kadabra takes fifteen damage. This is reflected in Player Two's Summary.

Note:Even if the Player Turns are reversed, this scenario plays out the same since Priority Buffs and DeBuffs always activate before Priority Attacks, and Feint always breaks Priority Buffs/Debuffs excluding Endure. Check the Progressive MoveDex for other conditions applying to Feint below.
[+] Moves that will use the Priority Buffs/DeBuffs Format:
Progressive MoveDex: Priority Buffs/DeBuffs
Move
Type
Slot Value
Power
Accuracy
Description
Snatch
Debuff
One Slot
-
-
The user waits for the opponent to use a Buff/Debuff move then, it jumps in and reaps the benefits for itself. When Snatch is used, the Pokémon makes a basic attack against an enemy. If this attack connects, the user may select one Support-type move in the target's arsenal, and use the move itself. Can only be canceled by Feint, cannot steal Helping Hand and you do not keep the Buff. Will activate before Priority Attacks.
Wide Guard
Buff
One Slot
-
-%
Protects self, and team, against attacks that target multiple team members. This move can be broken by Feint. Will activate before Priority Attacks.
Quick Guard
Buff
One Slot
-
-%
Protect self, and others, against all Priority Attacks, and can be broken by Feint. Will activate before Priority Attacks.
Protect
Buff
One Slot
-
-%
This move is less successful without a break. Will activate before Priority Attacks. There is no stamina penalty for this move, however it can not be used in succession and can be canceled by Feint.
Detect
Buff
Two Slot
-
-%
The user senses incoming danger and dodges. Will activate before Priority Attacks. There is no stamina penalty, however it can not be used in succession and can be canceled by Feint.
Endure
Buff
Two Slot
-
-%
This move helps to prevent the user from fainting and cannot be broken by any move, however it cannot be used in succession. Will activate before Priority Attacks.
Helping Hand
Buff
Two Slot
-
-%
This moves adds one and a half damage assistance to the teammate's next move. Will activate before Priority attack, can be canceled by Feint.
Magic Coat
Buff
Two Slot
-
-%
If a foe tries to use a move that inflicts a status change on the user, it is instead reflected back to the foe. This move will activate before Priority Attacks and can only be canceled by Feint.
Follow Me
DeBuff
One Slot
-
-%
Follow Me forces the opposing user to attack the user rather than the intended target during battle. This move will activate before Priority Attacks and can only be canceled by Feint.
Rage Powder
DeBuff
One Slot
-
100%
Rage Powder forces the opposing user to attack the user rather than the intended target during battle. This move will activate before Priority Attacks and can only be canceled by Feint.
Ally Switch
DeBuff
Two Slot
-
-%
Ally Switch can be used in single battles to send out any other team member before the attacks land. In double battles, you can change positions only with another ally. Feint is capable of overwhelming Ally Switch, this move will also activate before any Priority Attacks.
Priority Recovery Moves
  • These moves cannot be interrupted, except by the use of Fake Out. When Fake Out is used on a Recovery Priority, the effects are reduced by a third. Damage is deducted from the recovery move's total. When used to cancel a Recovery Priority, it only costs the user five stamina to use, and five stamina for the Pokémon whose Recovery Priority was interrupted.
  • These moves always activate after Priority Attacks, but before Slow and Last Priority attacks.
  • Speed Class determines when Recovery Moves activate in a turn in regards to Standard Attacks.
  • Recovery moves cap at 90 HP and cost ten stamina.
[+] Battle Example
Player One
-----
Staryu uses Recovery. Lvl 15. Recovery heals forty five HP.

Player Two
-----
Meowth uses Fake Out. Lvl. 15. Fake Out deals ten damage and cuts recovery by 1/3. The cost is twenty stamina.

Results: Staryu's Recovery is interrupted by Fake Out. Staryu recovers forty-five HP. Fake Out reduces the healing move by fifteen points. Fake Out causes ten damage. Staryu recovers twenty HP.

Note:If used to cancel a Recovery Move, Fake Out costs only ten stamina. A cancelled Recovery Move only deducts five stamina from the user. Fake Out works as a normal priority when used against a normal move; that is, the cost remains twenty stamina for ten damage, with auto-hit clauses.
[+] Moves that will use the Recovery Priority Format:
Progressive MoveDex: Recovery Priority
Move
Type
Slot Value
Power
Accuracy
Description
Heal Ball
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
This move will also heal for half of your total hit points. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Milk Drink
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
In the Random Number Generator located at the top of the site, roll from one to one hundred. If you roll one hundred through ninety, your Pokémon recovers half of it's total health. If you roll eighty-nine through sixty, your Pokémon will recover forty percent of it's total health. If you roll fifty-nine through one, your Pokémon will recover one-fourth, or twenty-five percent of it's total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Moonlight
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
On a normal day, this move will recover one-third of your total health. On a sunny day, this move will recover half of your total health. On a rainy day, this move will recover one-fourth, or twenty-five percent of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Morning Sun
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
On a normal day, this move will recover one-third of your total health. On a sunny day, this move will recover half of your total health. On a rainy day, this move will recover one-fourth, or twenty-five percent of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Recover
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
This move will restore half of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Refresh
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
The user becomes completely healed of all status afflictions. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Slack Off
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
This move will restore half of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Soft Boiled
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
This move will restore half of your total health, and can be used outside of battle. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Swallow
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
The amount of hit points this move recovers is dependent on the amount of Stockpiles you have. If you have one, you will recover one-fourth, or twenty-five percent of your total health. If you have two, you will recover one-third of your total health. If you have three, you will recover half of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Wish
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
At the beginning of the next turn the user or replacement is healed by half of the user's total hit points. This move can be Snatched. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Rest
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
Every turn the user remains asleep, one-third of its max hit points is restored along with five stamina. It's lasts for a duration of two turns, max. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Aqua Ring
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
The user restores one-sixteenth of it's total hit points. It can be Baton Passed. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Synthesis
Recovery
Two Slot
-
-
On a normal day, this move will recover one-third of your total health. On a sunny day, this move will recover half of your total health. On a rainy day, this move will recover one-fourth, or twenty-five percent of your total health. It costs ten stamina to use this move.
Slow Priority Moves
  • Slow priorities can be used to Intercept. Slow priorities cannot be used to Block.
  • Slow priorities cost 20 STA to Dodge.
  • Slow priorities begin after all other moves except Last Priority.
[+] Example
Counter - Physical, Two Slot | power based on previous attack (double the opponents physical attack. Costs twenty stamina to Dodge. Fails if a Special attack is used.)
[+] Battle Example
Charmander uses Tackle. Tackle deals ten damage. pending
Wobbuffet uses Counter.

Results: Wobbuffet takes ten damage. Wobbuffet gears up to strike back. Charmander may Dodge the twenty damage from Counter next turn at the cost of twenty stamina, or take the damage and continue.
[+] Moves that will use the Slow Priority Format:
Progressive MoveDex: Slow Priority
Move
Type
Slot Value
Power
Accuracy
Description
Focus Punch
Special
Two Slot
50
100%
This attack hits hard, but fails if a Priority Move (Ex: Quick Attack) is used. Cannot be used to Block, can be used to Intercept. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack.
Avalanche
Special
Two Slot
20
100%
This attack hits after a foe's attack. If the user is hit, the power of this attack doubles. Cannot be used to Block, can be used to Intercept. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack.
Revenge
Physical
Two Slot
20
100%
If the user is attacked before the use of this move, it's attack power is doubled. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack.
Circle Throw
Physical
Two Slot
20
90%
This move either ends a wild encounter, or is used after the foe attacks, sending the foe's Pokémon back into it's Pokéball. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack. Even if Blocked, the secondary effect of this move carries through.
Dragon Tail
Physical
Two Slot
20
90%
This move either ends a wild encounter, or is used after the foe attacks, sending the foe's Pokémon back into it's Pokéball. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack. Even if Blocked, the secondary effect of this move carries through.
Roar
DeBuff
Two Slot
-
100%
This move either ends a wild encounter, or is used after the foe attacks, sending the foe's Pokémon back into it's Pokéball. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack.
Whirlwind
DeBuff
Two Slot
-
100%
This move either ends a wild encounter, or is used after the foe attacks, sending the foe's Pokémon back into it's Pokéball. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack.
Magic Room
Status
Two Slot
-
100%
For five turns, nobody uses held items. This Status cannot be Dodged. It can be cancelled by Feint. This move is activated last, of all the Slow Priorities.
Trick Room
Status
Two Slot
-
100%
For five turns, all Speed Classes are shuffled so that the slowest Pokémon goes first and the fastest Pokémon goes last, and so on in the opposite order. This Status cannot be Dodged. It can be cancelled by Feint. This move is activated last of all the Slow Priorities.
Wonder Room
Status
Two Slot
-
100%
For five turns, all Defense and Sp. Def modifications are switched between foes. This Status cannot be Dodged. It can be cancelled by Feint. This move is activated last of all the Slow Priorities.
Counter
Physical
Two Slot
Varies
100%
Its base power grows when a foe attacks after Counter is initiated. It will fail if a Special attack is used. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack. This attack cannot Intercept or Block.
Mirror Coat
Special
Two Slot
Varies
100%
Its base power grows when a foe attacks after Mirror Coat is initiated. It will fail if a Physical attack is used. It costs twenty stamina to Dodge this attack. This attack cannot be used to Intercept or Block.
Last Priority Moves
  • Last Priority moves cannot be used to Intercept but they can be Intercepted.
  • Last Priority moves can be used to Block, but they cannot be Blocked.
  • Last Priority moves never miss against Physical moves.
  • Last Priority moves always go last.
[+] Example
Vital Throw - Physical, Two Slot | 23 (goes last, never misses)
[+] Battle Example:
Machamp uses Vital Throw pending
Blastoise uses Hydro Pump. pending

Results: Blastoise causes damage to Machamp. Machamp's Vital Throw failed. Machamp's stamina is reduced by ten.
[+] Battle Example (2):
Blastoise uses Bite. pending
Machamp uses Vital Throw. (Never misses against Physical attacks)

Results: Machamp takes damage from Blastoise's Bite. Blastoise is thrown for damage.
[+] Battle Example (3):
Milotic uses Dragon Tail. (Switches an opponent) pending
Machamp uses Vital Throw.

Results: Milotic uses Dragon Tail. As it is a Slow Priority and Machamp's Vital Throw is a Last Priority, Machamp is dealt damage and sent from battle before Vital Throw can deal damage to Milotic.
[+] Moves that will use the Last Priority Format:
Progressive MoveDex: Last Priority
Move
Type
Slot Value
Power
Accuracy
Description
Vital Throw
Special
Two Slot
23
Never misses
This attack always goes last and never misses when a foe uses a Physical attack. It will fail when used against a Special attack. It cannot be Blocked or Dodged, but it can be Intercepted.
HP
(hlth)
Hit Points, also known as HP, are a set number of points representing how healthy your Pokémon is. Every time your opponent lands a hit on you, you lose a certain amount of hit points. How many hit points you lose depends on the base power of the move, the ferocity of the move (Critical Hits), and the type of move when applying weaknesses and resistances. When your HP hits zero, your Pokémon is considered knocked out from its injuries.
[+] A Note About HP
Your Pokémon’s HP does NOT recharge as your progress through a topic. The only methods to restore a Pokémon’s health are HP Restoration Items such as Hold Items, Berries, and Potions, HP Siphoning moves (Be it Pokémon or the terrain), or getting your butt over to a Pokémon Center. However, by traveling from one area to the next (Ex. Walking from Kuro Caverns to Shinrei Caverns) your Pokémon will recover 50% of their total HP.
Stamina
(enrg)
Stamina, not to be confused with HP, is the amount of energy your Pokémon has to battle. The more energy a Pokémon puts into battle, the quicker its Stamina depletes so don‘t push them too hard. As a Pokémon’s Stamina lowers it gets noticeably slower and more sluggish, less accurate, and dodges become much more difficult to pull off, if at all. When a Pokémon runs out of Stamina they faint from exhaustion, so don’t neglect it. Note that "fainted" and "knocked out" status have no specific difference. They are just two different terms that need to be distinguished.
[+] A Pokémon’s stamina can be affected in a number of different of ways:
  • Successfully dodging of an opponents attack will result in fifteen points of Stamina being depleted on the spot.
  • If your opponent only manages to graze you with their attack, making it only a partial dodge, you will instead lose only five points of Stamina and take only one-half of the attack's initial damage. Note that partial dodges are a sign of a Pokémon’s weariness, thus they can only be performed when the Pokémon's Stamina falls below fifty percent.
  • When using moves like Fly or Dig, the first turn of the move will always result in ten points of Stamina being depleted, since the phase technically counts as an auto-dodge.
  • Using moves like Teleport and Extreme Speed to dodge will always result in five points of Stamina being depleted.
  • While participating in Double Battles you may have one of your Pokémon take a hit for your partner and sustain the damage they were meant to receive. This action goes in the Defensive Slot and results in five points of Stamina being depleted.
  • Moves that cause the user to receive recoil damage will, rather than take away HP, further exhaust the user and cause Stamina to be depleted. How much stamina that's depleted depends on the move itself, refer to the MoveDex for that.
  • Moves or Techniques used consecutively each turn will result in three points of Stamina being depleted, and stacks by three with each consecutive use. These include Dodging, Blocking, Intercepting, and move uses. Note that Techniques themselves are separate from moves. That is, blocking twice in a row results in three stamina loss, but blocking twice in a row with the same move results in six stamina loss.
  • Powerful moves, such as Draco Meteor and Overheat, in addition to decreasing the Pokémon's power each time they’re used, will also deplete five points of Stamina for each usage.
Note that not unlike HP, Stamina also has a few ways to be recharged as one travels. Basic and easy way is to allow stamina on your Pokémon to simply recharge as you, the Trainer, walks around. For each post after a battle, the Pokémon used will gain five stamina points for each post afterwards made by the player in that topic. Also, when you travel from one area to the next, your Pokémon’s stamina will be completely replenished regardless of how low it was. There are also Items, Abilities, Moves that can allow a Pokémon to regain its Stamina.
As your Pokémon’s Level reaches a new multiple of ten, their HP and Stamina will naturally increase accordingly.
Level Tiers
Level Range
HP
Stamina
1-95050
10-197070
20-299090
30-39110110
40-49130130
50-59150150
60-69170170
70-79190190
80-89200200
90-100220220
Last edited by Henri on 8:47 PM - Feb 02, 2014, edited 36 times in total.
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Owner
Awesomely Awesome
Owner
Awesomely Awesome
Joined: 1:44 PM - Jun 06, 2010

4:50 AM - Aug 08, 2013 #2

Damage
(pwnt)
Typically, a move’s power equals the amount of base damage it subtracts from the foe's HP. (check the MoveDex for the move's base damage)
[+] However, there are a few factors that can alter the power of a move:
  • Type weaknesses and resistances greatly alter damage done by a move. Super effective hits will deal two times the original damage, while not very effective hits will deal half the original damage.
[+] Example:
If a Pokémon uses a Fire move on a Grass-type and the base power of the move is forty, than the power of it is doubled making it do eighty damage. If a move is used against a type that resists it, such as a fire move being used on a Water-type, the damage is halved to twenty.
  • Double effective and least effective are also in place. However, double effective has been modified to mitigate excessive damage to coincide with PV's preset stats.
[+] Example:
If a Pokémon uses a Fighting move on a Bisharp (Dark/Steel) and the base power of the move is forty, than the power of it is multiplied by two point five making it do one hundred damage. Likewise, a Dark move will only deal ten damage.
Damage will vary with STAB and Level differences.
  • Differences in Level affect damage output and input.
    Formula: Pokémon with a level advantage will gain an extra point of resistance for every level advantage over an attacking Pokémon. Subtract from the total after all other damage is calculated. They will also receive one extra damage point for every level of advantage added to their attack. This is added after all other damage is calculated. Pokémon with a level disadvantage will have damage points docked one damage point for every level disadvantage. Their reduced resistance is reflected by the extra damage inflicted by the higher leveled foe therefore does not need a calculation.
[+] Example
A Level forty Donphan versus a Level thirty Starmie. Donphan uses Thunder Fang, which has a base damage of twenty. It is Super Effective, but receives no STAB, thus the damage output is now forty. But! Donphan is ten levels higher than Starmie, so with an extra ten damage points Starmie takes fifty damage. If Starmie were to attack Donphan with Bubblebeam, ten points of damage would be nullified by Donphan's level resistance. So even calculating Super Effective and STAB in addition to the base of twenty damage, Starmie would only inflict fifty points of damage.
  • Buffs and Debuffs (also known as Stat Changers) work in increments of two with a maximum of six stages meaning that up to twelve points can be added or subtracted to Attacks. If a move has been sharply/dramatically boosted, those work in increments of four with the same limit of twelve points.
  • Same-type Attack Bonus, or STAB, will add ten damage to the power of a move if it’s the same type as the user. Reminder: if a Pokémon is Level 10 and under, their moves do NOT get the STAB bonus.
[+] Example:
A Charmander using Ember will have the base power with an additional ten points while a Bagon using the same move will not receive any bonuses.
  • Environmental Damage can also be factor. Examples could be slamming your opponent into a tree or rock. Most examples of environmental damage are worth only five damage, but if it is executed in a particularly brutal manner can be good for ten. For instance: a fire-type thrust into a pool of water would take far more damage than if they hit a tree. A grass-type impaled by an icicle or thrown into a burning building would also logically take more damage, and so on and so forth.
  • The ferocity, known to be as Critical Hits, of a move also determines the amount of damage it does. If a move is executed in a way that would damage the foe more than usual, then these moves can be used in devastating ways to result in a 1.5x increase in damage.
[+] Example:
A Charizard taking a point-blank Hydro Pump to the face, it is considered a Critical Hit.
  • Abilities, such as ones like Blaze and Torrent, may also influence the final power of moves when activated. Check the AbilityDex for more information
  • There is a maximum damage limit for every Pokémon executing an attack. This damage limit is one hundred points of damage.
[+] Example:
Rhyperior uses Rock Wrecker against a Flying/Ice type. The base attack is fifty. STAB and double effective kicks the attack up to a whopping one hundred and fifty damage total. But that is much too powerful for most lower leveled Pokémon to withstand a hit - and even at the same Level Tier it would be overwhelming. If we changed the type of the foe, and only factored in super effective bonuses with STAB, the move is one hundred and twenty damage. More powerful moves can easily tilt the battle unfairly, as you can see. By reducing all excessive damage to one hundred, we've given players another chance to enjoy their battles even with a type disadvantage.
Evasion and Accuracy
(ddge)
In battles, there are certain moves which can significantly alter how a battle progresses. As already explained, a Pokémon's ability to dodge is determined by a set amount of Stamina, but certain stats can change this number either for or against Pokémon. These stats are known as Evasion and Accuracy. The way these stats work is simple, but a little different from your typical Buffs and Debuffs.
[+] Let's start with Evasion:
A Pokémon's Evasion stat determines how easily they can dodge attacks. As you can imagine, the higher a Pokémon's Evasion Stat, the easier it is to dodge and thus, requires less Stamina.

These are a few points about Evasion:
  • Boosting your Evasion is also a bit more limited compared to other stats. The stat is still increased by increments of two (Meaning, -2 Stamina to Dodge) but can only be increased by a max of three stages. This means the least amount of Stamina that can be used to fully dodge a move is nine while the most it can take is twenty-one.
  • A Pokémon's Stamina is reduced by five every time they increase their Evasion. Basically, they give up some stamina using an evasion-boosting technique in order to conserve more stamina throughout the battle.
  • Evasion Buffs can be used to dodge your opponent's moves whilst boosting your own Evasion, and are thus always Two Slot. Evasion Debuffs, however, are only One Slot
[+] Now let's move on to Accuracy:
Accuracy is another way to alter how easily one can dodge. The better a Pokémon's accuracy, the easier it is for them to hit their opponent and thus makes dodging for them more difficult. Alternatively, if you lower your opponent's accuracy, it makes dodging for you more easier.

Accuracy is very similar to Evasion, but some minor differences still exist:
  • Same as with Evasion, the Accuracy Stat is altered by increments of two with a maximum of three stages. If your Pokémon's accuracy is boosted by two stages, than your opponent requires fourteen stamina to dodge. Likewise, if your Pokémon gets hit with Sand Attack and has its accuracy lowered by a stage, then your opponent only needs eight stamina to dodge.
  • A Pokémon's Stamina is reduced by five every time they increase their accuracy.
  • Unlike Evasion moves, which can be used to dodge their opponent, accuracy lacks this secondary effect and is always One Slot unless otherwise specified.
Note that Evasion/Accuracy effects from moves last a total of seven turns before beginning to wear off, unlike Abilities which last until whatever triggers their effect is disposed of.
Mega Evolution
(dglv)
A select few Pokémon are able to perform what is called a Mega Evolution during combat. For a complete list of Pokémon able to Mega Evolve, please check the MegaDex
[+] Digivolve!
So Mega Evolution is pretty bad ass, but can be a little complicated. First off, your Pokémon needs to be holding a Mega Stone, but only one that corresponds with its species. Secondly, your character needs a Mega Ring to spark the Mega Stone. Once all the pieces are together, you are finally ready to perform a Mega Evolution!

In combat, Mega Evolving your Pokémon take up one slot and will allow it to transform into its Mega Forme. Sometimes this will change the Pokémon's typing and will almost always change their Ability. However, one addition that Pokémon Voyage has that the games do not is the inclusion of an additional and temporary Learned Move. At the end of combat, all Pokémon will revert back to their original forms.
Advanced Techniques
(cpow)

While Trainers are certainly able to rely solely on attacking and dodging for your basic battle techniques, a slightly more complex system exists to give you more options and diversity. These techniques are known as Blocking and Intercepting. Intercepting is essentially challenging your opponent's move with your own, and the stronger one coming out on top. Blocking is a bit different, being that you use one of your moves defensively to limit damage received from your opponent. Note that in both cases, factors such as type advantages are applied to the moves used by combatants, not the types of the combatants themselves.
[+] Let's start with Intercepting:
  • Only moves of the same -type- can intercept. That is, only Special moves can intercept special moves and likewise for Physical ones.
  • In these situations, STAB is also applied to the move, along with Super Effective Bonuses. These bonuses are applied to the move itself, not the Pokémon, and instead of being multiplied by two, they merely up the power of the move by ten for each. Like-wise, the move on the negative side of the Super Effective one has its power decreased by five.

    Ex. A Bagon and a Charmander both use Ember. Charmander gets STAB for the move, thus his Ember overwhelms the other Ember.
  • Obviously, in these situations, the move with the most power in the end wins. In this case, the Pokémon who's attack is overwhelmed by the other attack receives whatever damage remains after subtracting the damage of the weaker move from the stronger one. Again, in these situations, factors such as type advantages are applied to the moves used by combatants, not the types of the combatants themselves.

    Ex. A Monferno uses Flamethrower and the enemy Dewott responds with Scald. Flamethrower, in this situation, does (30 + 10 for STAB = 40 DMG) versus Scald which does (25 + 10 STAB + 10 for Type Advantage = 45). Scald thus overwhelms Flamethrower and Monferno takes 5 DMG.
  • If two Pokémon attack and the total damage output is equal, neither Pokémon takes damage, but both lose 5 stamina from it.
  • Note that a Pokémon who goes in for the interception sacrifices 5 Stamina to do so.
  • When one attack overwhelms the other, the Pokémon who's attack failed cannot fully dodge. They can, however, partially dodge to reduce the damage taken by half. The Pokémon that initiated the intercept cannot dodge.
  • When one attack intercepts a move that's immune to it (ie. Thundershock being intercepted by Mud Slap, considering ground-types are immune to electric-types) the attack gets 15 DMG shaved off.
  • "Intercepting" the opponent's attack automatically makes whatever move used "Two Slot"
[+] Now... Let's move onto Blocking:
  • The point of blocking is not to damage your opponent, but to limit your own damage to yourself.
  • Unlike with intercepting, only Physical moves can "block" other moves. However, they can potentially block both special and other physical moves.
  • If a Pokémon attempts a block, the result is 5 stamina being reduced.
  • Blocking falls within the Pokémon's defensive slot, and is one slot unless the move used to block is considered two.
  • Moves considered "unavoidable", such as Arial Ace and Shockwave, can also be blocked. However, doing so reduces their Stamina by another five.
  • STAB, along with weaknesses and resistances, are applied in this situation. That is, STAB is applied to both if it is present and weaknesses and resistances based on the blocker's move are also applied.

    Ex #1. A Quilava and a Grovyle square off. Quilava goes in to use Flame Wheel (20 + 10STAB x2 Super Effective hit = 60 DMG) and Grovyle blocks using Leaf Blade (30 +10STAB / 2 Weak against fire move = 20) the result is Grovyle taking 40 DMG as opposed to 60.
    Ex. An Electabuzz uses Thundershock and a Monferno blocks with Thunder Punch. In this scenario, Thundershock does (13 + 10STAB / 2 for Thunder Punch's resistance = 11 DMG) and blocking with Thunder Punch is (20 DMG). As a result, Monferno avoids damage altogether but still loses 5 stamina for the block. Also, though the Pokémon avoided damage, they can still be susceptible to a move's secondary effect.
Note: Blocking/Intercepting moves become more difficult for Pokémon as the battle rages on. When their Stamina is reduced by two-thirds of their maximum amount, then these techniques will fail.
Weather Conditions
(wthr)

Not all battles take place in calm weather. Sometimes, there are forces of nature that can either benefit or hinder your Pokémon's performance in combat. Unless logical requirements are met, all weather conditions (except Fog) can not be created indoors. This includes the effects of moves and abilities that create and change the weather.
[+] The common weather types are as follows...
  • Clear - Standard clear weather, devoid of any effects
  • Sunny - Increases the power of Fire-type moves by fifty percent and reduces time Frozen by two turns.
  • Rain - Increases the power of Water-type moves by fifty percent, reduces the power of Fire-type moves by twenty five percent, and reduces time Burned by two turns.
  • Hail - Damages all Pokémon who are not Ice-type for one sixteenth of max health per turn and extends time Frozen by one turn.
  • Sandstorm - Damages all Pokémon who are not Rock, Ground, or Steel-type for one sixteenth of max health per turn and raises all Rock-type Pokémon's Special Defense by one stage.
  • Fog - Lowers all Pokémon's Accuracy by two stages.
~-•-~
And that is our combat system. Here to answer the question that is most likely on all of your minds is Giorgio A Tsoukalos.
Last edited by Henri on 3:49 AM - Feb 14, 2014, edited 6 times in total.
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