Question for Discussion - What does Panerai DNA mean to you?

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Question for Discussion - What does Panerai DNA mean to you?

tsunami2000
Paneristi
Joined: December 8th, 2007, 9:58 pm

February 1st, 2018, 7:49 pm #1

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
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ThunderDownUnder
Paneristi
Joined: May 20th, 2013, 8:53 pm

February 1st, 2018, 9:06 pm #2

As one of my very earliest Panerai purchases albeit I did have vintage Panerai - Before - my 21 but I think these days for OP much of the specific DNA is based around the neo vintage DNA and they mean more and more on vintage being the earliest in the modern era so from 1997 on I wish I had time for a better missive tsunami San but sure the original DNA stands un challenged so it's deffo the bulk of the Brands DNA - in general - but more specific is post 1997 again a poor job with such an important topic 😭 But every time we see a new Panerai - it's almost impossible to not see some connection with the GPF era the Pre V era weather a crown guard or a case etc etc so the early DNA with the Flot Mas Hero's Riding the miale's into battle bravery and honor - Decima -Forza Panerai : the worlds FIRST DIVE Watch was after all a Panerai so we own that great to gloss over those era's but after 21 years we begin to see increased attention to the modern era DNA - sorry captain got to get into boost zone to start the day so rushed and badly expressed ♿️😱🤛🏻easily explained by considering the source 🇦🇺♿️






.
Ohhhh So Much MORE than just a Watch 🤩 it’s the mates behind the Watch & the “Mateships” we create that simply Blows me “Away” ❤️

Cheers Beers & Hoo Roo Hammer 🔨 🇦🇺♿️👍🏻
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mlcdmd
Paneristi
mlcdmd
Paneristi
Joined: September 17th, 2014, 2:44 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 1:11 am #3

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
They got their start with the luminescence and then the crown guard for waterproofing.

Now while that seems like every fifteen dollar quartz watch has those features today... Panerai were at the forefront of some of these developments. So much hinged on those elements that the model names are based on it.

Also, DNA by definition undergoes change, it's not static. mutation occurs constantly, usually for the better... But not always.

So I'm fully on board with the new direction. It's 2018, waterproof, 8 days, glow in the dark are a given.

So now they're having to innovate in new directions with new materials and methods. In house, ceramic, carbon, bmg, it's all great. Also out of my price range, but that's ok cause they're still making "entry level” models.

But the goal, the road, the "why"... It's the same:

Newer, better, cooler, tougher. (Ok, I'll give you that they abandoned tougher with the spring bars and weak wr rating).

I like the look, that's why most of us ended up here. And I know they'll hold on to that iconic design language.

But they've made their bones on first, forward thinking developments.

And I think that's where we're headed.
Mike C, 312 NYC
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mlcdmd
Paneristi
mlcdmd
Paneristi
Joined: September 17th, 2014, 2:44 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 1:20 am #4

As one of my very earliest Panerai purchases albeit I did have vintage Panerai - Before - my 21 but I think these days for OP much of the specific DNA is based around the neo vintage DNA and they mean more and more on vintage being the earliest in the modern era so from 1997 on I wish I had time for a better missive tsunami San but sure the original DNA stands un challenged so it's deffo the bulk of the Brands DNA - in general - but more specific is post 1997 again a poor job with such an important topic 😭 But every time we see a new Panerai - it's almost impossible to not see some connection with the GPF era the Pre V era weather a crown guard or a case etc etc so the early DNA with the Flot Mas Hero's Riding the miale's into battle bravery and honor - Decima -Forza Panerai : the worlds FIRST DIVE Watch was after all a Panerai so we own that great to gloss over those era's but after 21 years we begin to see increased attention to the modern era DNA - sorry captain got to get into boost zone to start the day so rushed and badly expressed ♿️😱🤛🏻easily explained by considering the source 🇦🇺♿️






.
I can't believe this wasn't a seventeen page thesis.

You do sum it up well.

Mike C, 312 NYC
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Miki_Ryu
Paneristi
Miki_Ryu
Paneristi
Joined: January 11th, 2018, 6:35 am

February 2nd, 2018, 3:05 am #5

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
When I first knew the brand, the DNA I associated with was the preVs, Bettarini and Radiomir cases...the half moon crown guard and wired lugs respectively prolly because much of the discussion I have read and participated when I started out was camped heavily around that.

It was simpler back then when the ogling was targeted at the preVs and SEs that was some form of a "vintage" reincarnation. And for mere mortal like myself, the only way I can have a piece of vintage Panerai history was from the books done by Ralf & Volker.

And as times goes by, through the amount of SEs that Panerai brought out, more exposure was made available and thus discussion then shifted to the Vintage era where there's much debate, good and bad, about the vintage world of Panerai.

The DNA that started with the PreVs have now turned into emulating many designs back from the early years of Panerai.

Like Hammer said, its difficult not to see the DNA present even on new release Panerai as the basic of the design still very much says Panerai.

Cheers.
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Acro-Pilot
Paneristi
Joined: March 8th, 2012, 4:58 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 6:09 am #6

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
My first instinct was to think of the 3646 and 6152. The more I think about it, the more I realize that the history some of my modern pieces have with me plays a bigger part in how I define Panerai DNA.

My first Panerai was a 177. I simply liked the way it looked and felt on the wrist. As many of us have, I found myself picking up others and trading a few as time went on. Today I wish I would have kept those early pieces in the watch box because I’ve learned over the years that the more experiences I have with specific pieces, the more special they become.

My 232 carries a lot of personal history with me and some would say it carries a lot of Panerai DNA. As I think about your question, maybe 10 years from now, the 42mm gold sub will evoke the same feelings and connection to OP’s history that my 232 does today. ...guess I’ll have to buy that 684 to find out.
- Peter

So much more than just a watch!
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Joseph56
Paneristi
Joseph56
Paneristi
Joined: March 5th, 2011, 3:02 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 11:31 am #7

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
Big SS case
Slight pillowing
Large round dial
Uncluttered
Big numbers
Crown guard and lever
Leather strap
Offset seconds
Funny guys on a website
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roadkingsteve
Paneristi
Joined: May 19th, 2013, 1:25 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 12:24 pm #8

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
Crown Guard, Luminor case, Radiomir case, 👍
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mlcdmd
Paneristi
mlcdmd
Paneristi
Joined: September 17th, 2014, 2:44 pm

February 2nd, 2018, 1:42 pm #9

Big SS case
Slight pillowing
Large round dial
Uncluttered
Big numbers
Crown guard and lever
Leather strap
Offset seconds
Funny guys on a website
Rubber works, bracelet feels wrong
Mike C, 312 NYC
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Kingsholm14
Paneristi
Joined: January 25th, 2005, 12:16 am

February 2nd, 2018, 2:04 pm #10

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
Buying decisions.
By that I mean when a watch comes out I find it interesting that so many diverse opinions draw me to my decision.
Just take the 24 sub for example. Titanium or polished. Hobnail dial. Artistic options but never any doubt it is a Panerai.
I think today’s era is offering more art than fact. It has to. We feed off the fact that these watches were so rare in the day. So how can we not expect creative diversity for this name to survive. Whether we like it is one thing. Whether we think it is disrespectful to the identity is totally different. That is another topic for another day. Take the PAM 98 alarm. Totally out there. Yet welcomed into the fold. It’s nice but meaningless. It’s a sought after Panerai though. We didn’t kick up a storm then. We possibly will now though as a new leader comes into our house. If we see more car related designs ie the Porsche era, then we will see flaming posts, and a demand for DNA.
So far Panerai have always reminded us one way or another it’s a Panerai and we all can see what that link is. We are educated now, thanks to this forum, and can discuss whether a blank dial is disrespectful to a sector of the world. I think that is fine. And I think modern variations are fine. This rumoured railroad design is gorgeous. That it is a version of a wall clock hanging in Florence gives it a link. It’s not DNA but a link. And that is the thin line we are about to walk.
The DNA buyer is limited now. The link buyer is their future. I like some link watches. I had a 9A. I love the 605.
Happy on both scores. But I think today’s shopper will look to the 605 candy first. Society throws pizzazz daily in our face.
My era of loving my father’s Omega is fading. Cherish your 1A.
Long live the link. God bless our DNA. Let’s hope Panerai continue with good designs to remind us why we are still here daily.
I ramble. I too need my coffee. X
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micah372
Paneristi
micah372
Paneristi
Joined: March 3rd, 2012, 1:55 am

February 2nd, 2018, 3:59 pm #11

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
To me, Panerai DNA is all about the watches and specifically the ones that most honor the history of the brand.

1. 3 hands max, 2 hands only is my preference
2. No complications
3. 3-6-9-12 (with open 6 and 9 please) or California dial
4. Classic case (aka 1950 and close relatives, Radiomir, Bettarini)
5. Long, patina'd leather straps

Many of the newer Panerai watches such as the Dues, submersibles, chronographs etc. contain traces of Panerai DNA and represent the brand moving forward while respecting their history.

Some of the newest watches, like that art-deco number they revealed this year, are to me not in any way representative of DNA and are simply Panerai trying to become just another watch brand that appeals to as many people with cash to burn as possible.
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mrpanerai
Paneristi
Joined: April 12th, 2006, 1:37 am

February 2nd, 2018, 6:43 pm #12

I have thought about this question many times over the years, usually around SIHH. As Panerai grew as a company and expanded into complications and new case designs, there was always a lot of discussion about the DNA of the brand. The comments would run the whole spectrum between positive and negative, usually centered around the DNA of the brand.

After attending SIHH, I sat down to really think about it from my personal experiences. When I first found the brand, and I would imagine a lot of you are in the same category, I had no clue about the WWII history of Panerai. Didn't know what a 3646, 6152 or 6154 was. My introduction to Panerai was the post Vendome, Bettarini case. It was just a cool watch to me. Different than anything else in the market. Big, bold and unapologetic. To me DNA was about that original feeling, seeing a watch in the wild and knowing it was a Panerai and knowing not too many other people were into it. I didn't agonize over painter versus sandwich or manual versus automatic or the thickness of the numbers. I just liked the way it looked on my wrist.


So now that the brand is expanding beyond its early roots, I look at each piece individually. Does it have the cool factor? Is it identifiable as a Panerai? Would it look good on my wrist?

When I think about it, to me DNA is having a shared past but being able to evolve over time while maintaining a connection to the past. I share DNA with my parents and siblings, and while you can tell we're related we are not identical.

For those that were around in the early years, were folks drawn in by the 1997 and beyond pieces or was Vintage already in the nomenclature?
I think you can't forget about size, 44,45,47mm
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