Loads of dive photos - Kauai, my son, and the 307

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Loads of dive photos - Kauai, my son, and the 307

khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 7:52 pm #1

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 8:03 pm #2

One more closing 307 signature shot!



Oh, and there were cool ancient 'anchors' not 'actors' at Koloa Landing. . . darn spell check! Lol.

Thanks for looking!

Kev.

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RUpanerai
Paneristi
Joined: April 10th, 2009, 9:16 pm

July 6th, 2012, 8:04 pm #3

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Reminds me when I was younger... been Diving about 100 times, but not in the last 8 years or so.

Never got certified because I always had my own tank with me and they never asked... maybe something I should look into when I go to Hawaii next week.

Nice pics and thanks for sharing... now where is my underwater camera?!?!


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cosmodog13
Paneristi
cosmodog13
Paneristi
Joined: January 9th, 2012, 6:57 pm

July 6th, 2012, 8:25 pm #4

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Thanks for posting and congrats to your son!
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Blake_P
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Blake_P
Paneristi
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 10:10 pm

July 6th, 2012, 8:38 pm #5

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Kauai is so beautiful on land, but sadly I must admit I've never seen it's beauty from that perspective until now! Congrats to your son and kudos to you for being such a proud papa to document the dive so wonderfully.
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aboen
Paneristi
aboen
Paneristi
Joined: September 2nd, 2009, 4:54 am

July 6th, 2012, 9:14 pm #6

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Andrew Boen
NoCal
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snoballz
Paneristi
snoballz
Paneristi
Joined: February 22nd, 2009, 1:02 am

July 6th, 2012, 10:02 pm #7

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



-luke

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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 11:24 pm #8

Thanks for posting and congrats to your son!
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aikiman44
Paneristi
aikiman44
Paneristi
Joined: July 5th, 2007, 4:06 am

July 6th, 2012, 11:26 pm #9

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Your son, diving in HI, the 307, the tiki bar..
Life at its best.

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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 11:26 pm #10

Reminds me when I was younger... been Diving about 100 times, but not in the last 8 years or so.

Never got certified because I always had my own tank with me and they never asked... maybe something I should look into when I go to Hawaii next week.

Nice pics and thanks for sharing... now where is my underwater camera?!?!

Let me know of you need some Kauai tips. I used to live there, my parents still do.

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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 11:28 pm #11


Andrew Boen
NoCal
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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 11:29 pm #12


-luke

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khaugh
Paneristi
khaugh
Paneristi
Joined: November 16th, 2006, 6:32 pm

July 6th, 2012, 11:29 pm #13

Your son, diving in HI, the 307, the tiki bar..
Life at its best.

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rioet
Paneristi
rioet
Paneristi
Joined: January 23rd, 2011, 9:34 am

July 6th, 2012, 11:33 pm #14

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



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H2Finally
Paneristi
Joined: January 11th, 2010, 9:41 am

July 7th, 2012, 12:52 am #15

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Looks like such a fun dive with your son m8te! Thanks for sharing! ))
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abunai
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abunai
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Joined: June 9th, 2006, 1:24 am

July 7th, 2012, 1:19 am #16

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



kama'aina myself as i lived in oahu for 10 yrs. actually heading to oahu/kauai in august and definitely planning to blow some bubbles. shoot me an email with some of your preferred dive shops. you boy looks pretty streamline, just gotta clean up the dangling gauges/octo and you're all set. TFS!!
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skipp231
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skipp231
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Joined: August 23rd, 2011, 8:53 am

July 7th, 2012, 2:43 am #17

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



I look forward to the day when I can do stuff like that with my son
Congrats to the both of you on reaching this milestone!
- Ken

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TokyoSkier
Paneristi
Joined: December 1st, 2011, 1:08 pm

July 7th, 2012, 3:36 am #18

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Wonderful post! Thanks for sharing! :-)
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nhattruyen
Paneristi
nhattruyen
Paneristi
Joined: October 7th, 2009, 4:13 pm

July 7th, 2012, 3:42 am #19

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



Great post, luv the pictures! TFS. nt
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AstorWilson
Paneristi
Joined: August 9th, 2004, 8:20 pm

July 7th, 2012, 5:23 am #20

My 10 year old son got open water scuba certified about a month ago in NorCal. Over the past two weeks, we dove the shores of Kauai, Hawaii. It was incredible watching my son experience life beneath the surface for the first time. It was also my first chance to use the Panerai depth gauge. As amazing as the 307 is on land, it is out of this world underwater. The gauge functioned perfectly and was extremely useful during our dives. As a junior certified diver, my son's depth limit is 40 feet. The bottom of many of the areas we dove were much deeper than that, so I had to constantly monitor our depth. Currents were ever present, so reaching back to my trailing dive computer would have been a hassle. It was so much easier to glance at my beautiful 307 for current depth and elapsed time. It was also cool to review our max depth at the tiki bar after our dive. We are already planning our next dives and my 307 will be with me every time I descend. On to some photos. . .



Here is my son setting up his gear at Koloa Landing. This is where Captain Cook first landed when he discovered the Hawaiian islands. The landing is full of things to see, including ancient actors and cannon balls.



His first descent into the big blue. His tank spanned his body from his neck to mid-thigh, still he was as graceful as a shark.



I hung out on the bottom, while he finished up the last of his open water skill certification on the anchor line.



Here is my son doing an open water compass exercise.



Just 5 minutes into the dive, just a tad over 7 meters agrees with the dive computer reading of 24 feet.



A spotted eagle ray.



Off he goes!



A pebble collecting urchin.



Look beyond the 307 and you'll notice a ton urchins depicted in the shot above.



My son, leading the way.



Swimming through caverns and tunnels.



A devil scorpion. I missed a shot of it swimming. It has bright yellow and red fins, very different from its rock-colored camo.



A lion fish.



Beautiful underwater caverns and tunnels (courage required).



A yellow trumpet fish.



An orange banded surgeonfish.



Love H20!



He made it! Gill from 'Finding Nemo' lives!!!



A moray eel.



My son chasing a turtle.



A spiny brittle star.



My favorite Hawaiian fish - the humumunukunukuapu'a (the state fish).



Shaka baby! Thanks for looking!

Let me know what you think and if you have ever considered diving. . . by all means, give it a shot!

Kev.



great post!

Rusty
---------------
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