Yellow-orange fly agaric

caveman2533
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October 15th, 2014, 10:49 pm #1

I have been watching these grow in a yard on my trip to and from work and today curiosity got the best of me.  So after passing them yet again, I made a U-turn and went back to see if I could harvest one and determine  what it was.  The homeowner  looked at me really strange and gave me permission. It almost seemed like he was annoyed that I thought it was necessary to even ask. But this beautiful specimen was just sitting there so I cut it from the underground roots of a fir tree and took it home.   Not desirable as an edible and may only good for its psychoactive properties, which sound like they are not worth the risk.

Amanita muscaria var. formosa

Steve Nissly
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Ryan3880
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October 15th, 2014, 11:01 pm #2

You can take a trip and never leave the farm : )
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rokchipr
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October 15th, 2014, 11:29 pm #3

Steve, This is the one I told you about that has "the gift that keeps on giving". The psychoactive properties are not metabolized but are passed out unaltered in the urine so they can judiciously be "recycled", if you get my meaning. How this was discovered by the people native to Siberia can only be imagined. Nice find. I found one last year also, and no I didn't eat it either!
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hada
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October 15th, 2014, 11:36 pm #4

Another check in your book anyway. They really look trip in dicular ( from Valley Girl ) lol
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Forager
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October 16th, 2014, 12:08 am #5

Beautiful samples Steve, I commend your spirit of inquiry regarding this visually irresistible mushroom. This mushroom has a great reputation for its psychoactive principles, so potent that as Blaise has indicated much of its post-digestive chemistry is retained for a potential second journey through the alimentary tract. I've read about affluent partying residents in Imperial Tsarist Russia who had partaken of Amanita muscaria placing bowls of their urine outside for the impoverished to ingest, as an act of 'charity'.

The Old World species has a long history as a shamanic device to facilitate contact with the spirit world but in most places was seen as a shortcut to the same psychic dimension achieved by means of drumming and dancing. The pertinent issue here is that the American version has a much higher ratio of toxin to hallucinogen compared to the Old World strain which is greater in its hallucinogenic properties to its toxic ones; in short, the American form will not do what the Eurasian forms are reputed to accomplish but will rather deliver an adverse effect to be sorely regretted. This is a toxic mushroom to be avoided, however beautiful.

The variant term Fly Agaric derives from the Old World custom of placing sliced bits of the fresh mushroom into a saucer of milk. This would attract nuisance flies in places they were not welcome, which would take the mushroom-infused milk and efficiently meet their end.
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mewolf1
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October 16th, 2014, 3:49 am #6

A friend of mine can attest to this. Dang fool is still living, but said he got more sick than he has ever been.







Forager wrote:




"American form will not do what the Eurasian forms are reputed to accomplish but will rather deliver an adverse effect to be sorely regretted."

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________


A friend of mine can attest to this. Dang fool is still living, but said he got more sick than he has ever been.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Forager wrote:


"The variant term Fly Agaric derives from the Old World custom of placing sliced bits of the fresh mushroom into a saucer of milk. This would attract nuisance flies in places they were not welcome, which would take the mushroom-infused milk and efficiently meet their end."

This is where the term "Dropping like Flies" comes from.
Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.
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Ryan3880
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October 16th, 2014, 4:25 am #7

Don't some of those have super potent toxins in them? I heard some of them can shut your kidneys down
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selfmade
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October 16th, 2014, 10:42 am #8

The Fly Agaric is one of the prettiest mushrooms, either red or orange. They are mycorrhizal with conifers or birch. Here is an Old World sample:


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caveman2533
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October 16th, 2014, 12:28 pm #9

It is a very beautiful mushroom. I haven't found any of the red ones yet.
Steve Nissly
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Forager
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October 16th, 2014, 2:23 pm #10

I coincidentally saw two (of the ones you found Steve) this morning, biggest Amanitas I've ever seen. The mature one was about 10" across the cap and its just-expanding sibling presented a sphere nearly as large as a softball. They were quite impressive rising from green grass in the rain. At first glance I thought they may have been oversized garden ornaments.

Ryan you are correct about the toxic potency of this family of mushrooms, severe kidney and liver damage, coma and death are known effects from ingesting them. This emphatically underscores the priority of accurate ID, including the most fine and subtle features of every individual mushroom harvested in a collection - nothing can be taken for granted. I know a man who very many years ago mistakenly ate one among other safe mushrooms he'd collected. When I asked him how it tasted he said it was great but it became the last mushroom he'll ever eat.
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Ryan3880
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October 16th, 2014, 2:59 pm #11

Wow that's crazy! It has always freaked me out a bit and steered me away from collecting my own edibles because I have heard that some can look nearly identical as the good ones but actually be packed full of toxin
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Forager
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October 16th, 2014, 4:43 pm #12

It is no different with edible wild plants. The potential for gathering ingredients for a lethal meal is just as great unless the ID is absolutely certain. A number of excellent and innocent plants have look-alikes which are toxic even in small doses (remember Socrates, who concluded an interesting career after a cup of tea).

The thing to keep in mind that foraging today as a novel, cool hobby which can supplement the diet is an extremely recent development. From time immemorial, well before we took our current form as humans we gathered wild plants for food so successfully that we now swarm all over the planet. In relative terms it's only been during the most recent 'seconds' of geologic time that we've specialized and left this task to 'food producers', leaving the rest of us to no longer need the knowledge. Unused and inessential, it is forgotten lore which ignorance has rendered a dangerous territory to tread without experienced guides or the materials and discipline to train for safety and success. It is certainly not a forbidding prospect when properly approached. Respect is essential but fear is out of place when sound knowledge and discipline is present.
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Ryan3880
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October 16th, 2014, 9:33 pm #13

Yeah I just don't want to end up in a mortuary or naked singing on the top of a wind will (if Ya know what I mean)
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