Wild Mushrooms

Identification, cultivation, harvesting, preparing, preserving, recipies, general ethnobotany... Disclaimer: Don't experiment with unknown plants, or rely on the information in this forum. Get your own information and use CAUTION!
Also,
A forum dedicated to sharing thought, ideas, methods and tools related to cooking and food preparation. Including, but not limited to discussion about cooking
vessels, mud/adobe ovens, fire pits and other methods of cooking. Also of interest would be archaeological and/or anthropological reference material pertaining
to our ancestors means and methods of food production and preparation.

Wild Mushrooms

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 5th, 2018, 1:26 am #1

A topic open to all entries - edible, medicinal, technologically useful for dye, firemaking, etc, as well as the novel and curious forms, including the simply marvelous or beautiful.  To begin....


Fairy Ring Mushrooms (Marasmius oreades), so called for their sudden appearance overnight in patterns of circles or crescents which were open to medievel speculation about they being the trace-markers of where Fairies had danced during the small hours.  However fascinating their growth habit, they present a regular opportunity for the forager interested in a culinary delight -
Fairy Ring Mrms.JPG
Another, the Chicken of the Woods (Laetiporus semialbinus), along with the Green Russula (Russula parvo-virescens):
Chicken and Russulas.JPG The Chicken was translated into mock-Chicken Dijon over brown rice with wilted Goosefoot (Chenapodium), the Green Ones sauteed with onion, garlic and grated ginger to provide an incidental topping to baked potatoes, vegetables or eggs.

Any and all other fungal entries welcome.
Quote
Like
Share

selfmade
Registered User
selfmade
Registered User
Joined: January 13th, 2013, 3:56 pm

July 6th, 2018, 4:59 pm #2

Marvelous selection! Only three species are presented but all are the best within their groups. Especially remarkable are the Fairies, so abundant in my youth that often I did not bother and now very rare find of just a few bodies, not enough to enjoy them. Same with the Green Russulas, at least they are drought tolerant and more reliable in appearance, although never abundant in my area. 
Unfortunately, I've got nothing to contribute, as I have seen no mushrooms since last fall, but I will enjoy whatever is shown here.
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 1:48 am #3

Ah, selfmade!  Good to see you resurface.

You're right about the Green Ones, we are not surprised to encounter them during hot, dry forays.  I consider them more than a consolation prize, I like their firm texture and mild flavor... and I am amused at their pronounced fishy scent while cooking (not unlike its distant cousin, Lactarius volemus).

This season's fungi got off to a fairly late start here despite prolonged cool wet conditions in spring.  Knowing that mushrooms fruit in every environment from the Arctic to the African desert, I'm confident that you'll eventually be greeted by them.  When this occurs I hope you'll have your camera in hand.
Quote
Like
Share

boletus
Registered User
boletus
Registered User
Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:08 am #4

Im going to have to go with Russula xerampelina as the best for its group :p. The little mushrooms like those marasmius always scared me and I stay away. Ive never felt confident enough to sample them. Its crazy that youre still picking mushrooms..they have been looong gone for quite some time out this a way. Its hot as a forge out here.
-Jason
Quote
Like
Share

boletus
Registered User
boletus
Registered User
Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:15 am #5

This was my only mushroom foray for this season. I was just too busy. We did manage to find a lot of Boletus aureus though!! My favorite mushroom. Interestingly, this is a rare form that stains blue on the pores. Im learnin' her young! She knows how to id miners lettuce and mustard already :p. Pretty cute huh?

Sent from my LGMP450 using Tapatalk
Last edited by boletus on July 7th, 2018, 4:16 am, edited 2 times in total.
-Jason
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:57 am #6

Funny Jason, I'm as comfortable with Marasmius as you are with Russula.  Neither come near most foragers Top 10 but I'll always rather stop for a sample than walk past them.

As to your offspring, kudos for the early introduction as much for her developing acumen in discriminating IDs!  Couldn't help but notice the beautiful family resemblance between this -




...and this -
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 3:06 am #7

Failed to mention that we're only just breaking an extended run of 90 to 100+ degree temperatures here with oppressive humidity.  Just tonight has it just come down to the more humane conditions of the breezy 80s, great to enjoy fresh air blowing through the house again.  Yet even in nefarious conditions, mushrooms found a way to express their need to flourish (and along I came with a stone knife to translate their aspirations to mine).
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:49 pm #8

A walk in the woods this morning...


Some tiny Small Chanterels
Micro-Chant.JPG
Black-Staining Polypore
M. giganteus.JPG
Ganoderma
Ganoderma.JPG
Berkeley's Polypore
Berkeley's.JPG
Quote
Like
Share

Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Joined: October 28th, 2009, 4:36 pm

July 8th, 2018, 8:52 pm #9

After 3 weeks of bountiful chanterelle harvests we have hit the tail end so went for a mixed bag:

Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 8th, 2018, 11:13 pm #10

Terrific!  I like a mixed collection of mushrooms and I'd take the same ones I see in your assortment.  

How have you been preparing the Chanterels, and how are you preserving your surplus?  Have you noticed any palatable distinction between the Strobilomyces siblings (ie, the 'Old Man' vs S. confusus)?  
Quote
Like
Share

Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Joined: October 28th, 2009, 4:36 pm

July 9th, 2018, 12:15 am #11

Forager wrote: Terrific!  I like a mixed collection of mushrooms and I'd take the same ones I see in your assortment.  

How have you been preparing the Chanterels, and how are you preserving your surplus?  Have you noticed any palatable distinction between the Strobilomyces siblings (ie, the 'Old Man' vs S. confusus)?  
Some of the chanterelles I gave away, because I think they are best for fresh eating, but my wife has also been experimenting with pickling them.  She's done two batches with two different recipes, but I don't know the details. (I don't like anything pickled.)  Last year we found a giant chicken and she pickled some of that and liked it very much.  I never even got brave enough to try it.  This year, not even a hint of a chicken!  One of the cool things about mushroom hunting is how you never know what you are going to get.  On the Strobilomyces  I don't know one from another, and have only eaten them in spaghetti sauce or something like that.  The orange milkies (which I think are two different but closely related types) we sauteed and added to the spaghetti sauce for diner tonight. 
Quote
Like
Share