Wild Mushrooms

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 5th, 2018, 1:26 am #1

A topic open to all entries - edible, medicinal, technologically useful for dye, firemaking, etc, as well as the novel and curious forms, including the simply marvelous or beautiful.  To begin....


Fairy Ring Mushrooms (Marasmius oreades), so called for their sudden appearance overnight in patterns of circles or crescents which were open to medievel speculation about they being the trace-markers of where Fairies had danced during the small hours.  However fascinating their growth habit, they present a regular opportunity for the forager interested in a culinary delight -
Fairy Ring Mrms.JPG
Another, the Chicken of the Woods (Laetiporus semialbinus), along with the Green Russula (Russula parvo-virescens):
Chicken and Russulas.JPG The Chicken was translated into mock-Chicken Dijon over brown rice with wilted Goosefoot (Chenapodium), the Green Ones sauteed with onion, garlic and grated ginger to provide an incidental topping to baked potatoes, vegetables or eggs.

Any and all other fungal entries welcome.
Quote
Like
Share

selfmade
Registered User
selfmade
Registered User
Joined: January 13th, 2013, 3:56 pm

July 6th, 2018, 4:59 pm #2

Marvelous selection! Only three species are presented but all are the best within their groups. Especially remarkable are the Fairies, so abundant in my youth that often I did not bother and now very rare find of just a few bodies, not enough to enjoy them. Same with the Green Russulas, at least they are drought tolerant and more reliable in appearance, although never abundant in my area. 
Unfortunately, I've got nothing to contribute, as I have seen no mushrooms since last fall, but I will enjoy whatever is shown here.
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 1:48 am #3

Ah, selfmade!  Good to see you resurface.

You're right about the Green Ones, we are not surprised to encounter them during hot, dry forays.  I consider them more than a consolation prize, I like their firm texture and mild flavor... and I am amused at their pronounced fishy scent while cooking (not unlike its distant cousin, Lactarius volemus).

This season's fungi got off to a fairly late start here despite prolonged cool wet conditions in spring.  Knowing that mushrooms fruit in every environment from the Arctic to the African desert, I'm confident that you'll eventually be greeted by them.  When this occurs I hope you'll have your camera in hand.
Quote
Like
Share

boletus
Registered User
boletus
Registered User
Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:08 am #4

Im going to have to go with Russula xerampelina as the best for its group :p. The little mushrooms like those marasmius always scared me and I stay away. Ive never felt confident enough to sample them. Its crazy that youre still picking mushrooms..they have been looong gone for quite some time out this a way. Its hot as a forge out here.
-Jason
Quote
Like
Share

boletus
Registered User
boletus
Registered User
Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:15 am #5

This was my only mushroom foray for this season. I was just too busy. We did manage to find a lot of Boletus aureus though!! My favorite mushroom. Interestingly, this is a rare form that stains blue on the pores. Im learnin' her young! She knows how to id miners lettuce and mustard already :p. Pretty cute huh?

Sent from my LGMP450 using Tapatalk
Last edited by boletus on July 7th, 2018, 4:16 am, edited 2 times in total.
-Jason
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:57 am #6

Funny Jason, I'm as comfortable with Marasmius as you are with Russula.  Neither come near most foragers Top 10 but I'll always rather stop for a sample than walk past them.

As to your offspring, kudos for the early introduction as much for her developing acumen in discriminating IDs!  Couldn't help but notice the beautiful family resemblance between this -




...and this -
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 3:06 am #7

Failed to mention that we're only just breaking an extended run of 90 to 100+ degree temperatures here with oppressive humidity.  Just tonight has it just come down to the more humane conditions of the breezy 80s, great to enjoy fresh air blowing through the house again.  Yet even in nefarious conditions, mushrooms found a way to express their need to flourish (and along I came with a stone knife to translate their aspirations to mine).
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 7th, 2018, 2:49 pm #8

A walk in the woods this morning...


Some tiny Small Chanterels
Micro-Chant.JPG
Black-Staining Polypore
M. giganteus.JPG
Ganoderma
Ganoderma.JPG
Berkeley's Polypore
Berkeley's.JPG
Quote
Like
Share

Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Joined: October 28th, 2009, 4:36 pm

July 8th, 2018, 8:52 pm #9

After 3 weeks of bountiful chanterelle harvests we have hit the tail end so went for a mixed bag:

Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 8th, 2018, 11:13 pm #10

Terrific!  I like a mixed collection of mushrooms and I'd take the same ones I see in your assortment.  

How have you been preparing the Chanterels, and how are you preserving your surplus?  Have you noticed any palatable distinction between the Strobilomyces siblings (ie, the 'Old Man' vs S. confusus)?  
Quote
Like
Share

Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Hummingbird Point
Registered User
Joined: October 28th, 2009, 4:36 pm

July 9th, 2018, 12:15 am #11

Forager wrote: Terrific!  I like a mixed collection of mushrooms and I'd take the same ones I see in your assortment.  

How have you been preparing the Chanterels, and how are you preserving your surplus?  Have you noticed any palatable distinction between the Strobilomyces siblings (ie, the 'Old Man' vs S. confusus)?  
Some of the chanterelles I gave away, because I think they are best for fresh eating, but my wife has also been experimenting with pickling them.  She's done two batches with two different recipes, but I don't know the details. (I don't like anything pickled.)  Last year we found a giant chicken and she pickled some of that and liked it very much.  I never even got brave enough to try it.  This year, not even a hint of a chicken!  One of the cool things about mushroom hunting is how you never know what you are going to get.  On the Strobilomyces  I don't know one from another, and have only eaten them in spaghetti sauce or something like that.  The orange milkies (which I think are two different but closely related types) we sauteed and added to the spaghetti sauce for diner tonight. 
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 27th, 2018, 1:57 am #12

A couple of additions.

Grouping of young Purple-Spore Puffers -
Puffer Group.JPG
Closer view -
Puffers.JPG

First drawn by their conspicuous white caps and groupings, I enjoyed my encounter with Meadow Mushroom in the same field.  Like the Fairy Ring, these also erupt in arcs and circles which support the vigor of the surrounding grass:
MM Ring Supporting Grass.JPG ...this arc is fruiting on the leading edge of radial expansion, evident from the taller lush grass in their wake.  As the fungus grows in the substrate the arc expands.

Here's a shot of a small group at 2 days old (wavy and pink margins), 1 day old (bright white cap) and just rising (button) -
Meadow Mrms 2, 1, and 0 Days Old.JPG
And a closer look...
Meadow Mrms.JPG

On the topic of arcs and radial growth patterns I came across a classic circle of Fairy Ring mushrooms under an immense White Oak with so great and spreading a crown that it must have been mature when it stood in a treeless pasture for the cows when my town was still farmland -
Classic Fairy Ring.JPG
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 28th, 2018, 1:57 am #13

Between thunderstorms today I ran across some not yet shown.

A scatter of Parasols, a good year for them -
Parasols.JPG

A fair number of Two-Color Boletes, just a few shown here -
Two-Color Bolete.JPG
A young King Bolete -
Young King Bolete.JPG
...a closer look at the fine white reticulum on the stem just shy of the cap:
Young King, Reticulum Detail.JPG

I'd referred earlier to the gleaming white caps which signaled Meadow Mushrooms, but far less edible fungi may be mistaken for them by the casual observer.  Amanitas are among the most deadly mushrooms and are all too frequently misidentified as good edibles.  Here's the Amanita longipes, at a glance appearing quite similar to the Meadow Mushroom and also growing from the ground:
Longfoot Amanita.JPG Although many will readily see the differences between the two it is important to include this mushroom if only to underscore the high stakes of risk.

Also, a Red Raspberry Slime, obviously named.  In this sample the white mycelium from which the fruiting body erupts is quite evident as it steadily reduces this log to soil -
Red Raspberry Slime.JPG
Quote
Like
Share

boletus
Registered User
boletus
Registered User
Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

July 28th, 2018, 2:36 am #14

Thats a gorgeous bolete, Forager. I usually use them in Italian cooking. How do you generally prepare yours?
-Jason
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 28th, 2018, 3:21 am #15

Generally, I like to use them in quiche along with wild vegetables, the cream diffuses their flavor throughout the dish, leaving the house beautifully scented.  Also, superb in transforming eggs and cheese into a sublime omelet or transforming a baked potato into a culinary treat.  Even better sauteed and treated with wine and cream for a topping to pasta or venison.

Knowing that their flavor intensifies over time, I'm not shy about drying them and applying them to a range of treatments after a year or so.  An advantage to this is the resulting dust and tiny fragments, which serve as a seasoning to pasta, rice and a number of other neutral staples.  And the richly flavored liquid from reconstituting them is beautiful added to gravy, sauces or soup stock, even a tablespoon mixed in with eggs before they join the pan (the liquid may be poured into ice trays, frozen, and called into play per serving as inspiration demands their use)... the economic value of dried mushrooms is multiplied but the greater pleasure is in enjoying them when they are just hours (or less) old.
Quote
Like
Share

Chippintuff
Registered User
Chippintuff
Registered User
Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

July 28th, 2018, 3:25 am #16

I'm jealous. Down here (Bryan/College Station, TX) mushrooms of any kind are hard to find, and then they are small. It's just not wet enough here for them to prosper.

WA
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 28th, 2018, 3:36 am #17

The mushrooms are ephemeral, most of them appear and disappear so quickly that catching them in their prime is a matter of precise timing, and many years may pass before a particular species may be seen - but I do not take it for granted, enjoying great pleasure in this pursuit.  For example the Raspberry Slime is a first for me, even after nearing 30 years of serious engagement and fieldwork.

On the other hand, your part of our country offers access to a variety of knappable stones, artifacts and fossils, which in turn I envy.
Quote
Like
Share

Michael Bootz
Registered User
Michael Bootz
Registered User
Joined: September 21st, 2007, 4:23 pm

July 28th, 2018, 9:33 am #18

Red Raspberry Slime - I've never heard (or seen) that before. Indeed aptly named ;-)
I'm wondering if this one is also edible?
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 28th, 2018, 5:52 pm #19

I know of no fungal slimes which are said to be edible, despite the associated food descriptor... here's another also aptly named: Scrambled Egg Slime -
Scrambled Egg Slime.JPG There are also slimes whose common first names are Carnival Candy, Pretzel, and Tapioca.  My personal favorite slimes molds are the Chocolate Tube, and Wolf's Milk, which are unmistakable.  If I can find them, I'll be sure to post pictures of them.

This family of molds can be fascinating to the student of mycology.  They undergo impressive transformations over the course of a day, completely changing their shape, texture and color, going from slimy accumulations to feathery, powdered (ie spore-bearing) individualised bodies.  

From the Audubon Field Guide to North American Mushrooms by Gary Lincoff:
"Slime molds differ from other fungi by beginning life as protoplasm, with the amoebalike ability to move and ingest nutrients.  In some species, this movement can be the conspicuous flowing of a gelatinous substance called plasmodium, which is usually encased in a transparent sheath except at its margin.  The slime mold propels itself through 'protoplasmic streaming': a series of expansions and contractions that continues until fruiting occurs.  The plasmodium can be extensive and easy to observe, or hidden in bark, wood, or leaves."

This is a pretty wild fungus, demonstrating animated behavior.
Quote
Like
Share

Forager
Registered User
Forager
Registered User
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 28th, 2018, 7:35 pm #20

Having shown the Two-Color Bolete, I'll follow up with its toxic look-alike the Brick Cap:
Brick Caps.JPG Quite similar in most respects, the certain distinguishing feature lies in how quickly (as in, immediately) it bruises blue when cut or pinched.  The Two-Color turns blue slowly.

Other edible Boletes on this morning's walk were the Boletus campestris -
B. campestris.JPG ...small but acceptable.

Another little one was the Chestnut Bolete -
Chestnut Boletes.JPG Definitely worth collecting.

Another in this family is the Ash Tree Bolete, one which in contrast to its dull and drab cuticle displays a spectacle in the beautifully patterned structure of its pores -
Ash Boletes.JPG
Others were the Micro-Puffers with their dense micro-ornamentation -
Micro-Puffers.JPG
...these average about the diameter of a dime.

And last, the elegantly slender Rooted Oudemansiella, named for its long tapering root-like stem which descends several inches below the soil -
Rooted Oudemansiella.JPG
Quote
Like
Share