WIoutdoorguy
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4:32 AM - Aug 25, 2018 #41

There is a lot of very nice photos and commentary in this thread. Truly inspiring! I have only partaken in the the harvest and consumption of morels and puffballs so far. I do like them both. But after reading through this thread I feel I am missing out on a part of nature's bounty. However, I don't want to poison myself. I do have a mushroom book, titled Smithsonian Handbooks, Mushrooms. It is very detailed and explains a lot about the shape, structure, spore prints, poisionous look alikes, basic locations, and many other things about mushrooms. Hopefully I can find and identify some of the other edible mushrooms that may grow in my location.
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boletus
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5:17 AM - Aug 25, 2018 #42

If you are on the west coast, I highly recommend "All That The Rain Promises and More" in combination with "Mushrooms Demystified" both by David Arora

Id also like to add on Foragers chanterelle lookalikes: Here on the west coast they can be confused with Omphalotus olivascens, or the western jack-o-lantern mushroom, of which has a dark greenish/olive colored flesh, grows on wood, has true gills and also tends to grow in clumps. Quite different, but worth noting nonetheless as it has caused some illness out this way. Ill have to snap some photos in the fall.
-Jason
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Forager
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10:30 PM - Aug 26, 2018 #43

Rob I'm glad that you've found this topic to be engaging beyond the photos (and thanks for the kind words).  You've got the right idea about moving forward with caution and the need to be armed with sound knowledge... I'll add to Jason's recommendation of the Arora books with two which I've come to lean heavily on more or less over the last 25 years:

The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms by Gary Lincoff is outstanding for its photography, succinct descriptions, and beautifully informative and well-detailed introductory information and appendices.  One of the benchmark texts for our field of study and pursuit.

Also, Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America   A Field-To-Kitchen Guide by Fischer and Bessette.  This mycological duo is peerless in their understated but obvious enthusiasm for mycophagy, also providing exquisite photos, streamlined descriptions with keys to narrowing the focus on good edibles, a section on toxicology, numerous sidebars of entertaining and informative anecdotes and an extended species-specific recipe section.  Very user-friendly while delivering the necessary goods in uncompromising but non-intimidating terms.


Jason, thanks for calling out the Jack-o-Lantern as a Chanterel look-alike, I was clearly splitting hairs within the family but your reference bears significant relevance for the more general readership.  During the time I spent with the North American Mycological Association there were annual reports of the nation-wide poisonings which had occurred, and it seemed that every year 'Jack' had been mis-IDed as a Chanterel - resulting in unnecessary unfortunate outcomes.  I always welcome your input, and can only dream of an opportunity for either of us (or any others) to capture an original image of these mushrooms in their green bioluminescence - this has long been an elusive personal goal.

It's funny, many may sense that toxic mushrooms may advertise their danger through a bitter or nasty flavor, if not some warning-oriented color or weird formation.  However I know of a celebrated anthropologist who had survived Amanita poisoning.  After we discussed how abysmal the experience had been and his good fortune in recovery, when I asked him how it tasted, he said 'Great'!  Thus, there is no substitute for clean science and strict discipline in this pursuit.  

The current state of folklore appears to be related more toward a mythology of entertaining stories than long and healthy life.  Long ago more facts must have been intact in such vital information but gradually increasing separation from practical knowledge and its eclipsing by industrial food processing media has apparently enabled a great forgetting of fine points and essential details.  When I was a boy during the early '60s I'd watch my maternal grandmother (who was raised as a shepherdess in the southeastern peninsula of Italy) gathering wild plants from the yard, which to her carried food value - our sense of 'food' was mutually foreign even with its overlapping species and products.  Only decades later was I capable of catching up to this universal heritage and enjoying its layered benefits.
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Forager
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10:49 PM - Aug 26, 2018 #44

From this afternoon's foray.  I try to avoid the redundancy of posting images of the same species but some are difficult to resist.  Today was a good day for the Small Chanterel (Cantharellus minor) which was presenting itself in proportions similar to its more celebrated cousins, the Golden and Smooth.  Unlike the latter two, this one displays vivid color and intricate ridge patterns, so I couldn't help but offer a portrait:
Sm Chant Ridge Pattern.JPG
Part of what grabs me is the subtle secondary ridge forms between the dominant primary ridges more visible on the larger samples.  This makes for an esthetic micro-composition which delivers as much satisfaction as the mushroom's edibility... if not more.

Also on this foray I encountered a single specimen of a mushroom I've only collected once before some 25 or more years ago, and also a single specimen - the Black Velvet Bolete (Tylopilus alboater) -
Black Velvet Bolete.JPG ...an exquisite edible which I readily recall from my first trial, so memorable was the experience of its flavor.
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Hhop
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12:25 PM - Sep 02, 2018 #45

I love this topic. Over the last couple of years, I have made an effort to begin learning one or two mushrooms over the season. Like many people, I have gathered and eaten Morels my whole life.

Photos of a few I have recently found. Most of these I left and did not pick. Not all are edible. Please jump right in and correct me on any not identified correctly! It will be much appreciated.

Oyster.
Oyster Mushroom Mackinaw Fish Wildlife Area 17aug2018-2.JPG

Boletus

Boletus Mushroom Mackinaw Fish Wildlife Area 17aug2018-2.JPG
Jack O Lantern .... non edible I have been told and sometimes confused with Chanterelles
Mushroom Jack O Lantern Mackinaw Fish Wildlife Area 17aug2018-2.JPG
Chanterelle
Farmdale Hike Chanterelle 30june2018-2.JPG
Chicken of the Woods
Chicken of the Woods Mushroom 28july2018-2.JPG
"You don't have to stop playing when you get old, but you get old when you stop playing."
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Forager
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2:46 PM - Sep 02, 2018 #46

Harold I'm glad to see your photography contributing to our topic, it's a pleasure to enjoy your perspective and ability in this medium.  I'm envious of your legacy with Morels - many years pass between my own success with this regionally elusive delicacy.

I readily agree with your IDs.  The Bolete family is crowded with frustrating fruiting bodies which can be a challenge for even experts to precisely identify.  Your photo of this mushroom is my favorite of the group, with the intensely luminous Chicken a close second.

Thanks for jumping in, hope to see more.
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Hhop
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12:47 AM - Sep 04, 2018 #47

A couple more from today. I need help with identification of at least one. I had a nice easy hike, with our dog that we just rescued on Saturday. He was on the list to be euthanized. A great dog with very nice personality.
Jackson my companion today:
Jackson Meadow Valley Park 03sept2018.JPG Gem Studded Puffballs
Gem Studded Puffball Mushrooms Meadow Valley Park 03sept2018.JPG
I am not sure the I.D. of these. They are growing on a dead hardwood log.
Mushrooms on log Meadow Valley Park 03sept2018.JPG
"You don't have to stop playing when you get old, but you get old when you stop playing."
http://hhopsnaturewalk.blogspot.com/
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DuxDawg
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2:48 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #48

Herein lies my tiny contribution to this thread. The smallest Dryad's Saddles I've seen. The largest is less than half an inch across. 

IMG_20180902_164200.jpg
Tiny Dryad's Saddles




 
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Forager
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3:33 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #49

Indeed!  I've not yet seen Pheasant Back of such diminutive yet fully formed stature, your contribution is 'tiny' only for the size of the specimen, which makes your offering more notable.  

Thanks for this addition, I don't think Polyporus squamosus was in our current roster until now.
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5:24 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #50

Yes, a "little" lighthearted fun about their size and my infrequently posting pics, especially of fungi.  ;)  Sadly phone pics never do the subject justice!! Even the smallest of that group was clearly recognizable. That stump has been producing less each year since the dead standing Box Elder it was part of fell. Suspect that has a lot to do with catching them at such an early stage of growth. Others nearby were fist sized and it's only been two days since I last walked this patch of woods.  

Note the tiny bite in the largest: I was not the only one to spot these diminutive fungi! Suspect a White-footed mouse (there are three den trees nearby, two of which currently have young) or a chipmunk (at least two dens nearby). (In all fairness, credit for the knowledge of the dens goes largely to my canine hiking companion.)

Alas, several days of heavy rains washed out most of the fungi in my locale, including these. Was hoping to show how even small things can become great in due time, as the DSs in this area tend to reach 18" across at maturity. (Biggest DSs I have ever seen approached 3' across.) Good news is those same rains will induce more to sprout! 
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5:24 PM - Sep 07, 2018 #51

Whilst upon our evening hike yesterday, came across some more diminutive fungi. Interesting that they lose their "spikes" as they mature. 
IMG_20180906_191932.jpg
Tiny puffballs


Experimenting with the camera settings on my phone accidentally yielded this 1970s-esque "Retro" look. The quarter, while distracting and garish,  hopefully helps to convey their actual size. As further help, the short fat conifer needles are from White spruce, while the long thin needles are from White pine. 
IMG_20180906_191844.jpg
Retro puffballs
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WIoutdoorguy
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12:29 AM - Sep 08, 2018 #52

Ok, my first contribution to this thread and I hope I am correct on it's identification! Please correct me if I am wrong as I'm new to identifying mushrooms.
I believe it is a peppery bolete. Family,  boletaceae. Species, chalciporus piperatus.
The book I have says inedible but sometimes used as a spice.
IMG_20180907_185240973.jpg
IMG_20180907_185110896.jpg
IMG_20180907_184935708.jpg
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Forager
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7:26 PM - Sep 08, 2018 #53

Gentlemen, thanks for the additions of these entries.

DD the 'before and after' contrast of both ripe and spent Puffers is an interesting feature to have captured.  And the retro-70s character of the follow up shot sent me reeling as though a flash-cube had gone off all at once.

Good diagnostic images WIguy.  I've never collected Chalciporus piperatus but I became curious about it after seeing your photos.  The many members of the Bolete groups can be quite challenging to ID and I think that yours is no exception.  At first sight I was put in mind of the Suillus grouping of Boletes, which include many edible species, some of them quite attractive.  One of the resources I consulted indicated that Chalciporus is a synonym for Suillus, which explained my association.   A consensus of the more obvious details indicated a reddish-brown pore surface which only just begins to descend the stem, a cap of similar color as the stem and a yellow mycelial mass at the base of the stem.  

Some of these features are not evident on your sample but I wonder if you may have found a cousin within the Suillus family.  These mushrooms tend to be characterised by a slimy or sticky cap, whose skin may be peeled free from its flesh.  I've found many different Suillus under or near Pines, and as mentioned, a number of them are edible.


With September underway I am optimistic that we will soon see a shift in the species produced, including some of the Big-Game Polypores... let's hope so, with cameras ready.
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11:59 PM - Sep 09, 2018 #54

A couple more.

In the spirit of DuxDawg's tiny specimens this is by far the smallest mature example I've yet found of an Ox Tongue or Beefsteak Polypore (Fistulina hepatica - what a name for an edible!) -

Small Beefsteak Polypore.JPG ...for scale, here it is in hand -
Fistulina hepatica in hand.JPG The copious tartly-flavored red juice even from this small sample is evident on the knife, with traces on my hand.  Regrettably I underestimated the accelerating growth of our puppy who snatched it from the kitchen counter prior to processing.  It is apparent that my wife and I are joined by our canine in an avid appetite for the wild.  Unfortunate, this being an exceptionally uncommon mushroom in our region... could have been worse, she ignored the collection of Chanterels and Milkies from which she nabbed the Ox Tongue.

And this is the largest edible Lactarius I've yet taken, the Voluminous Latex Milky (L. volemus) -
Large L. volemus.JPG
There were others gathered during this brief foray which have already been represented here by species, but there was one which I considered so attractive that I resisted my habitual pattern of needing to ID it.  This time I simply desired to recognize it for its unique beauty -
Unknown Fruiting Body, Dorsal.JPG I enjoy the cleft cap distinguished by its corrugated, crimped and micro-lobed margin, especially along the lower half.  The raised umbo is pronounced and quite peaked....

Unknown Fruiting Body, Ventral.JPG The gills are rather crowded and somewhat squirrelly toward the top of the picture, the stem is twisted with creased flutes appearing like an eccentric marble column, and its scent is mild and inviting.

Many mushrooms are delicacies, others function for medicine, and some are just beautiful.
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boletus
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3:26 PM - Sep 10, 2018 #55

Im patiently waiting for the rain to return, so I can offer some contributions as well. Its one of my favorite times of the year, watching the dead, dry land, come back to life. It happens so quickly, it almost seems like overnight. 
-Jason
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WIoutdoorguy
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1:57 AM - Sep 11, 2018 #56

Boletus and Forager, thank you both for the recommendation of other books for the identification of mushrooms. I have come to realize, through trying to identify a few mushrooms, and also from Foragers comments about the mushroom I posted, that the book I have is incomplete. So I will definitely look into purchasing a few more books to help with the learning process. Thank you both again for your recommendations.
Rob
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Forager
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2:57 AM - Sep 11, 2018 #57

Rob, I believe that one cannot possess too many field guides and references to consult.  Every good text (and there are many) includes information particular to the perspective and emphasis of its author(s) so that a consensus in many details pertinent to a single species will cover many more fine points than a single book, however authoritative.  

When I find something new to my experience I look for unanimity among all of my references, especially before the sample comes anywhere near a plate.  Only then may I greet it by name and begin to explore its culinary merit if edible.

I wish you well in what can be a daunting yet vastly engaging pursuit - be assured of our support and encouragement.
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Forager
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1:52 AM - Sep 13, 2018 #58

Late this morning I obeyed the magnetic pull of instinct and detoured from work into a woods I recently began to explore which has already shown promise.  Within minutes I found my first Hen of the Woods for this year... mid-September as an average date of first encounter for this one is very much on track in my area.  Due to environmental circumstances I was unhappy with the photos taken prior to harvesting, so I took a shot of the cutting board after trimming, along with the pair of Lactarius volemus which joined the Hen -
Hen and Milkies 2018.JPG They fulfilled their destiny in a pan with shallots, grated ginger and a clove of garlic, along with select seasonings.  This was dressed in a white wine reduction with cream stirred into the whole.  As to this evening's dinner, few toppings are capable of rendering a simple baked potato into so delectable and satisfying a feast.
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VirginiaKnapper
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3:08 AM - Sep 13, 2018 #59

Could y'all list some of y'alls recipes for preparation? Whether it be favorite, simple or complex, quick or lengthy.

Sent from my SM-J327V using Tapatalk

"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Nothing like busting out a Savannah River out of some gnarly shit." - Robert Godshall, 1st annual ThunderRidge knap in.
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Hummingbird Point
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6:29 PM - Sep 13, 2018 #60

This one, good with any mushroom, especially like it for chanterelles and chicken of the woods and served over pasta:



From this book, which is excellent and i highly recommend:

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