Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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Joined: October 21st, 2006, 7:11 am

May 9th, 2016, 2:53 pm #31



Last week I got a chance to get out in the field, as you can see from the photo the snow has still not quite melted in the area, although it was no problem it turned out winter storms knocked down a lot of trees and those blocked a number of roads so I didn't get to where I really wanted to go. All those big flakes in the foreground must mean there is a Clovis point under that drift?















Didn't move any snow, but did find an endsnap nearby that appears to have a large overshot across a large portion of just one side. From the break to the tip is about 2 1/8 inches.







A midsection that looks like it has a flute. 



A classic overshot flake. 

Last winter I found a MA thesis online by Mark Estes that compares the differences between Western Stemmed and Clovis debitage. I don't know why the link won't open for me now, but here it is anyway:

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=ma ... ndian+2009

Of interest is Fig. 6.12 All classes of flakes taken together the math shows Clovis to be "significantly different" from WST. In just the Overshot flake category:

WST= zero 

 Clovis about 3%.

So all in all this season has started out pretty well for the co-occurrence hypothesis. I found a lot of other worked stuff, but only one other endsnap that is sort of diagnostic. I'll post that when I have more time.
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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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May 14th, 2016, 2:13 pm #32

Another link to Mark's MA thesis.

http://www.academia.edu/5767731/Paleoin ... ley_Nevada

Paleoindian Occupations in the Great Basin: A Comparative Study of Lithic Technological Organization, Mobility, and Landscape Use from Jakes Valley, Nevada

Here is the other tip I found a couple of weeks ago, it has a rather Clovis look to it in plan form and the asymmetrical tip is a common trait for Clovis, but is also very common for other cultural types as well. It is very well made, but there are no traces of telltale overshots on either side, so just another one for the "iffy" bin.

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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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May 19th, 2016, 10:31 pm #33

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knapperbob
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knapperbob
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May 20th, 2016, 3:54 am #34

So, have you found a stray from Wenatchee?

Knapperbob
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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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May 20th, 2016, 1:33 pm #35

It was found by a local collector and he was not about to tell me where he found it. It has extensive end thinning (both ends), an overshot scar, a remnant flat spot on one edge, and it certainly is the right material for a Wenatchee.
Here is one from the Fenn Cache with similar attributes:
http://lithiccastinglab.com/gallery-pag ... eforms.htm
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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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June 12th, 2016, 2:07 am #36



No snow Memorial Day, but lots of tree problems.





Nice, but what the heck is it?













 
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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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July 6th, 2016, 12:58 am #37

http://lithiccastinglab.com/slide-set-pages/83hinge.htm
Also, Callahan (1979) did a great job making a modern facsimile which can be found on page 132, fig 59 here:
http://sultanaeducation.org/wp-content/ ... llahan.pdf

This means that Clovis sites in the Great Basin, Colorado, Texas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Virginia (literally coast to coast) have some attributes that are very homogeneous.
I have now found 4 basal and 4 distal examples that are identical to Callahan's example on page 132. When I say identical I mean, without prior knowledge of material types,
one would not be able to separate out what I've been finding in a blind test from either Callahan's replica or the Clovis examples from other states.

I also found a broken basalt hammer stone at one of the sites. When I got home I found a few small basalt cobbles in a local creek bed and have been practicing making over shot flakes and looking at the
Wallner lines. You can see in the last photo that those lines are very coarse. The lines made by my basalt hammer stone and a large moose billet are in contrast very, very fine. But guess
what? I don't know a thing about how they measure those lines, so I don't know if looking at them visually is telling me anything or not. I'll worry about that later.
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Lee Olsen
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Lee Olsen
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November 1st, 2017, 6:01 pm #38

Progress is being made...slowly. Last March I stopped by the NFS office in John Day, Oregon and gave them the GPS readings to a site where this biface is located:

The lady I talked to said she would take a look  to see if they already had the site located (pinned) on their wall map, since that is a lot of what they do, search for sites. I didn't hear anything back so I suppose that means they did.
I found several other examples of scratched bifaces online, they are thought to have been made by transporting long distances.
Large scratched point blank at Anzick Page 251 Fig. 7 :
http://escholarship.org/uc/item/1gr0p7t5
and the Rutz point also shows similar scratches:
http://lithiccastinglab.com/cast-page/r ... slarge.htm
Page 30 shows a large scratched recent biface along with a Clovis era biface like some of those found  at Anzick:
https://scahome.org/wp-content/uploads/ ... e_2006.pdf
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