What type of mushroom

Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

June 5th, 2018, 9:39 pm #1

Is this a chicken of the woods?

WA
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IMG_1129.JPG IMG_1128.JPG
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Forager
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Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

June 5th, 2018, 10:06 pm #2

I recognize it as such, but unfortunately it appears to be spent.

An optimal Chicken of the Woods is of a brighter and more vibrant color and the margins of its 'shelves' are still slightly rounded instead of tapering to a thin edge.

There is a good chance that it will fruit in the same location during its next growth cycle.
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Hillbilly Homer
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Hillbilly Homer
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June 5th, 2018, 10:08 pm #3

Looks like what dad called "hen and chicks"
Find a local mushroom expert to check out mushrooms you are not familiar with before eating...😀
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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June 6th, 2018, 4:18 pm #4

Hillbilly good to see you back...
Forager is the local Mushroom expert...LOL!~!

Interesting to hear what a old timey Mushroom forager called it... Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Hillbilly Homer
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Hillbilly Homer
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June 6th, 2018, 7:08 pm #5

Quillsnkiko wrote: Hillbilly good to see you back...
Forager is the local Mushroom expert...LOL!~!

Interesting to hear what a old timey Mushroom forager called it... Quills
Thank you Quills...:D


LOL ya Forager posted while i was still typing.
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Forager
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Forager
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June 10th, 2018, 1:35 am #6

I'm also glad to see you back, Homer.  I easily recall a number of your posts, most particularly the Locust thorn burglar alarm - a classic. 

I think you offered the more appropriate comment.  Because I know that WA is very cautious and respectful of plant and mushroom chemistry I felt at liberty to offer a direct response.  However, your words convey necessary wisdom to a greater readership which includes curious but uninformed folks who may not grasp how serious this topic can be.
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fungusfinder
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fungusfinder
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June 10th, 2018, 9:27 pm #7

Laetiporus sp. Should be bright yellow underneath.  This one is too old to eat.
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JoyDelight
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JoyDelight
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June 11th, 2018, 4:59 pm #8

Lacterious volumnes are a good eating mushroom and are coming out now in Florida. Identification includes the white milky color that is sticky. The color is tanish orangish. Look them up. I use a field guide to help me.
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Lacteriouse Volumbnes
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Forager
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June 11th, 2018, 6:11 pm #9

We have three magnificent edible Lactarius species which look more or less alike, here in NJ.  L. hygrophoroides is more common than its cousins and looks identical to your sample.  The L. volemus has more closely spaced gills, tends to be a bit larger, is scented like fish only when cut or bruised (upon cooking they smell like mushrooms) and 'bleeds' latex generously.  The third, L. corrugis has crowded gills and a richer, deeper color than the others.

All three are outstanding, with a dense texture and beautiful flavor.  Finding any one of them is delightful, as much for their rich color and form as the promise they bring to the table.  Up here they begin to appear in early July and can run until October.
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Chippintuff
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June 11th, 2018, 6:12 pm #10

Thanks everybody for all the comments. I felt pretty sure that was the correct ID, but wanted to be sure. I found this one on my brother-in-law's place in middle TN. It's a shame that my home area is too dry to have many mushroom opportunities.

WA
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Forager
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June 18th, 2018, 6:39 pm #11

I wish I'd thought of this at the time of my original post describing a properly ripe specimen of Chicken of the Woods....

This shows what I had in mind:
Chicken 1.JPG
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Quillsnkiko
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June 22nd, 2018, 10:32 pm #12

That is such a beautiful Picture Forager.

Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Forager
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June 23rd, 2018, 12:13 am #13

I agree Quills.  I consider myself so fortunate to encounter Nature at her finest in so many different settings... and glad to have had a camera in order to sort of bring others along on my forays.

And they tasted as beautiful as they look!  I slowly cooked them over low heat, and after I killed the flame I stirred in a little cream and coarse mustard for a mock Chicken Dijon served over rice with a scatter of fresh thyme leaves.
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